backlot

Shameless, you are the worst. Season after season you put us through the wringer, and last year you nearly destroyed us with your darkest, most harrowing season yet. This season you promise things will be lighter, and then for two consecutive episodes you go and rip our hearts out and smash them on the floor like plates at a Greek wedding. Will you ever cut us a break?
The 50 Greatest Gay TV Characters

1. Kurt Hummel, Glee

Actor: Chris Colfer
2009-present
Previous Rank: 7

Speaking of the K portion of Klaine (Doesn’t he deserve more than one letter in that mash-up name? Injustice), your winner and undisputed world champion of gay TV characters is none other than Kurt Hummel, the plucky young sprite who stylishly paraded his way into legend and our hearts when he entered that glee rehearsal room over four years ago. What can we say? There is no character quite like Kurt.

The notion of young gay characters on television is still in its fetal stages, though the Glee universe has injected a growth hormone into that process, which is why Kurt has been such a remarkable presence on the television scene. He is fully realized in a way that young gay characters just haven’t been before. He is not simply a statement or storyline or supporting character used to build up the diversity of the gang. He is a person, as outspoken and self-assured as he is confused and fragile, realistically stereotypical without being a cartoon.

Through his first few seasons, Kurt endured many of the expected dramatic travails of the gay high school character, including the emotional coming out and an entire season of bullying, but through that he never became the sad, isolated tragedy he might have become. His enduring brightness, coupled with the openness and genuine warmth Chris Colfer brings to the character, has established Kurt as a symbol of triumph over difficult circumstances for many young gay people. He emerged on the other side, still caring, still optimistic, still funny.

And that’s really why he tops this list. We have watched him grow up and make mistakes and endure, which has cultivated a love, ownership, and protectiveness over him. He’s our Kurt.    –SB

I don’t understand Glee‘s writers. I really don’t. They’re like if really talented chefs prepared a four-course, five-star meal and right before they served it to you, literally every single time before they set the plate down on the table, they were like, “You know what’ll make this taste even better? If I spit in it.” And then you’re like, “Wow, gross. It looks good and smells good but all I can think about is how you fucking spit in it.” And they’re like, “God! We slave and slave and slave over these dinners and you’ll never be happy!” And you’re like, “I would be happy if you’d just stop spitting in the food!” And they’re like, “You hate all food!” And you’re like, “No, you asshole. I love food. I love your food. I just hate spit in my food.” And they’re like, “OK, here’s the same dish served a different way. And also here is my spit in it.” And you’re like, “Seriously? I can’t eat here anymore.” And they’re like, “Stupid angry lesbians.”

Just make the meal and stop spitting in, Glee! Jesus, how hard can that possibly be?!

[…]Let it be, let be. Let it be, let it be. Stop spitting in my pasta, frikkin’ Glee.

—  Heather Hogan, 05x02 review, The Backlot
Previously on Glee, Blaine Warbler did some dumb stuff with Eli C. and so Kurt broke up with him forever — except for Christmas and weddings and funerals and Valentine’s Day and Halloween and Arbor Day and Citizenship Day and Groundhog Day and Susan B. Anthony Day. Finally Blaine just told Kurt that they were going to be together for all the days, “And don’t freak out, but my doctor says I’ve contracted Ultimate Tight Pants Syndrome (UTPS) and apparently it’s contagious.”
— 

The Backlot, Glee recap 4x21

I’m laughing so hard and it’s only the first paragraph. Heather is going all out in this recap

Heads up! Best part of the episode — maybe the season! — coming through! Coach Roz calls Blaine and Becky to her office to tell them that she’s real suspicious of the fact that they’re co-captains of the Cheerios. It’s Fruity Fonzie she’s most worried about. Why? Because he’s never done an actual cheer in his life, but he got Sue to make him co-captain and three weeks later she got fired. Coach Roz has a perfectly logical explanation, though: “That makes me think you used your fruity voodoo powers to put a hex on her that caused her to bring a gun to school for no reason and get real clumsy so she drops it twice and it goes off both times. That sounds like some dark-sided fruity voodoo stuff to me.” She says it all in one big breath while Blaine’s face is teetering on the edge between incredulity and delight. Becky very nearly comes out with the truth but gets it together in time to take Roz’s blood oath and loyalty pledge.


Words can’t do justice to the next part. Roz makes Blaine and Becky repeat back a promise never to hex her, emphasis on the “neeeeeevvvver.” It’s so ridiculous and so hilarious. If we get outtakes from any scene this season, I hope it’s this one. The editor probably had 30 takes to work from and Darren Criss must have broken in every one of them because even in the one they aired, he’s almost giggling up when he says “do solemnly swear.”

—  The BackLot (formerly AfterElton) 04x19 recap
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Today I went on the Universal Studios Backlot Tour and managed to get photos of a cute easter egg.

The Hasbro offices are right next to the people who make the Hannibal TV show. Outside the Hasbro offices there’s a Mr. Potato Head holding a Hasbro clapperboard. In between the two buildings, there’s a severed Potato Head arm holding a cell phone, with blood dripping from its open wound.

How fucked up is that?

He is fully realized in a way that young gay characters just haven’t been before. He is not simply a statement or storyline or supporting character used to build up the diversity of the gang. He is a person, as outspoken and self-assured as he is confused and fragile, realistically stereotypical without being a cartoon.

Through his first few seasons, Kurt endured many of the expected dramatic travails of the gay high school character, including the emotional coming out and an entire season of bullying, but through that he never became the sad, isolated tragedy he might have become. His enduring brightness, coupled with the openness and genuine warmth Chris Colfer brings to the character, has established Kurt as a symbol of triumph over difficult circumstances for many young gay people. He emerged on the other side, still caring, still optimistic, still funny.

And that’s really why he tops this list. We have watched him grow up and make mistakes and endure, which has cultivated a love, ownership, and protectiveness over him. He’s our Kurt.

[about Derek’s wound] A quick search on the internet would tell him that just about any ailment can be cured by extensive applications of sex with Stiles. Repeated treatments could be necessary. There are whole websites dedicated to describing the ways in which this cure should be applied.
—  The Backlot [X]
Previously on Glee, Santana finally moved to New York with Kurt and Rachel, and the family they made there — of one gay lady and one straight lady and one gay man and two boyfriend pillows and one girlfriend pillow — was exactly the kind of urban home situation that makes our hearts grow like the Grinch in the presence of Cindy Lou Who, so we were like, “Oh, finally!” And Glee was all, “So what you’re saying is you want to see more Marley and Kitty and Ryder and Jake?” And were like, “No.” And Glee was like, “So yes?” And we were all, “No, is what we said!” And Glee was all, “But what you meant was yes?” And we were like, “No!” And Glee was like, “Fuck you, too bad, here’s Ryder getting Catfished for 600 hours.”
—  The Backlot (formerly AfterElton), 04x20 review
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per request, the saga continues