awesome women post

anonymous asked:

on your biblical women post you added some names in the tags, so can you explain further why you like them as well?

  • Claudia Pilate - oh, the Pilates. You would think they would be the obvious villains of the Passion Play because, yknow… they’re the Romans. They’re the colonizers. They’re the ones who, essentially, send jesus to his death - but because the gospels are written as propaganda, some of that aimed towards Romans, the Pilates get pacified in the text and that puts them in this fascinating, villains-but-not, moral-but-not perspective that is one of the most complex and interesting parts of the passion. So some sources say Claudia is plagued with dreams about Jesus, and that’s why she warns her husband off killing him, and others say she’s a Christian convert - the first Christian convert. The Pilates and their weird psuedo-political actually love match moral quandry marriage/role in Judea is honestly the greatest
  • The Queen of Sheba - SHEBA IS THE BOMB HONESTLY. MY FAV SINCE I WAS LIKE SEVEN YEARS OLD she’s a figure that’s shrouded in myth - there’s arguments over where the kingdom of Sheba even was, so like most of the stuff in the old testament it’s all up in the air, historiography-wise - but honestly I love even just the concept of her, a queen in her own right with her own kingdoms to rule over, who wants to learn and understand about other faiths and people and so rocks up to the court of King Solomon like ‘teach me about god!’ and he looks at her like ‘mmmk… if you teach me about love’ WHAT GREAT RECIPROCITY BETWEEN THEIR ANCIENT NATIONS
  • Jezebel - LADY MACBETH, CERSEI LANNISTER, CLAIRE UNDERWOOD ARE ALL JUST DIFFERENT VERSIONS OF JEZEBEL. She’s the woman born into a male dominated world and uses every weapon she has - sexuality, manipulation, other people’s perception of her - to make a place for herself and win some power, any power. She’s villified for it, of course, and she meets her end because that’s what happens to women to connive, don’t you know, that’s what happens to women who assume that they’re on an equal playing field with men - and she’s demonised in the text because the text wants so badly for you to assosciate a woman who had agency with sin, and with false prophets, of going against the natural order of things. Jezebel knows her world, she knows how to wield power, she knows what symbolism does so even when she knows she’s about to die, she dresses up in all her finery and jewels because even though she lost, she’s still the queen.
  • Esther - y’all know your Margaery Tyrells and all those beautiful lowkey political conniving queens? ESTHER IS THE ORIGINAL FLAVOUR. ESTHER IS PROTOTYPE and i love her so much. So Esther’s a foreign queen in a foreign land, married to a king who killed his last wife. But despite all that, and the fact that she has absolutely no political capital, she still manages to use her beauty and her guile and her intelligence to sway the emperor and save not only herself BUT HER ENTIRE PEOPLE IN HIS KINGDOM. And she even makes him fall in love with her along the way ESTHER IS SO BOMB THAT IN THE SAUSAGE FEST THAT IS THE BIBLE SHE GETS HER OWN BOOK.
Who can find a virtuous and capable wife? She is more precious than rubies. Her husband can trust her, and she will greatly enrich his life. She brings him good, not harm, all the days of her life.

She finds wool and flax and busily spins it. She is like a merchant’s ship, bringing her food from afar. She gets up before dawn to prepare breakfast for her household and plan the day’s work for her servant girls.

She goes to inspect a field and buys it; with her earnings she plants a vineyard. She is energetic and strong, a hard worker. She makes sure her dealings are profitable; her lamp burns late into the night.

Her hands are busy spinning thread, her fingers twisting fiber. She extends a helping hand to the poor and opens her arms to the needy. She has no fear of winter for her household, for everyone has warm clothes.

She makes her own bedspreads. She dresses in fine linen and purple gowns. Her husband is well known at the city gates, where he sits with the other civic leaders. She makes belted linen garments and sashes to sell to the merchants. She is clothed with strength and dignity, and she laughs without fear of the future. When she speaks, her words are wise, and she gives instructions with kindness. She carefully watches everything in her household and suffers nothing from laziness.

Her children stand and bless her. Her husband praises her: “There are many virtuous and capable women in the world, but you surpass them all!”
—  Proverbs 31: 10-29 (via @thylovelylionheart)

Seeing all this black love and celebration on my dash is making me so, so happy

Like there’s been so much awful crap this year and this jolt of fire and joy and affirmation is so refreshing. I want more little girls to grow up with superheroes that look like them, have more heroines that can love and be loved and never be diminished for it, and more evidence that they are wonderfully made, narratives without limits. These films and shows and everything we fight for are for THEM

P'Li = Badass Sniper

Seriously though, taking the events of this week’s episode, and previous encounters with her and the Red Lotus into consideration, it’s clear that P'Li is the team’s long-range specialist, and an accomplished tactician in her own right. Zuko wasn’t just blowing smoke when he said that, individually, the Red Lotus was capable of taking down any bender on their own, and P'Li shows us just how right he is in “The Ultimatum.”

Her style may not be as physical and brutal as Ming-Hua’s, as forceful as Zaheer’s airbending, or as widespread as Ghazan’s, but with her skills and intellect, it is just as deadly. As we saw in the previous series with Combustion Man, the style of combustion bending is at it’s maximum lethality at a distance, effectively making benders well-versed in this art some of the deadliest snipers known to the world of Avatar.

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