autumn-de-wilde

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Lighting, Layers and Reflections by Autumn de Wilde

American photographer, Autumn de Wilde has designed a pair of transparent and reflective jewel toned structures for a photo-shoot in the dry Californian landscape.  

Made of a combination of mirror and colored plexiglass, images of the landscape are reflected on the structure, and  the landscape is simultaneously cast with rose, warm gold and aqua tinted sunlight.

Instagram.com/wetheurban

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Elliott Smith’s 5th and final (in his lifetime) studio album was released on 18 April 2000.

Recorded in different studios over the course of nearly 3 years, the album was, according to some critics, a digression from Smith’s previous albums, or, according to others, a progression. Whichever the case, it was the most successful of his albums, peaking at #99 in the US.

Autumn de Wilde took the photos for the album (with Smith standing in front of the Solutions Audio-Video Repair store in Los Angeles), and Smith described the title (based on a Schoolhouse Rock song Smith had covered): “there’s something I liked about the image of a skater going in this endless twisted circle that doesn’t have any real endpoint. So the object is not to stop or arrive anywhere; it’s just to make this thing as beautiful as they can.”

“Speaking of someone who can never be forgotten,  I would like to bring up Elliott Smith. I used to watch him transform on your stage. He may not have wanted to perform, but you had a gentle way of reminding him how much he needed to. It went from not being sure whether he’d get on stage to being hopeful that it may not come to an end. Those were special nights. And, in addition to Elliott Smith, you offered us the space to experience the deep friendship between Elliott Smith and Jon Brion. It seemed as if they felt, on some level, that they were the only ones who understood each other.  Jon had a way of “being” with Elliott that seemed to put him at ease, or at least make him feel significantly better.  And Elliott had a way of sparking a look of pure admiration and awe on Jon’s face when he’d sing “Say Yes” with his eyes closed.  This kind of experience can’t happen everywhere.  The moments that “happen” at Largo happen because you’ve created, and consistently provide, the space and tone that are required for them to occur.”

Colette Weintraub