autumn in old town

LIST OF GEORGE DEVALIER’S FINISHED, UNFINISHED, AND PLANNED FICS THAT WE KNOW OF

So I’ve been getting some messages since deValier’s most recent page update asking where someone can find a certain fic, what another fic was supposed to be about, or if that fic was finished or not. To answer these questions I’ve decided to make a post about each of them (with links to them if they exist) for your convenience.

FINISHED FICS:

Veraverse:

We’ll Meet Again (Us x Uk; 13 chapters) 

Keep Smiling Through (short sequel to We’ll Meet Again; 1 chapter)

Auf Wiedersehen, Sweetheart (Germany x Italy; 18 chapters)

Mapleverse:

La Patisserie de la Rose (France x Canada; 6 chapters) 

Libelle Hall (Prussia x Austria; 3 chapters)

Of Ponies and Edelweiss (short sequel to Libelle Hall; 1 chapter) 

Others:

Blue, White, Red (Us x Uk; 3 chapters) note: character death/tragedy  

Sleep, Little Bird (Sweden x Finland with Sealand; 1 chapter) note: character death/tragedy  

Gallipoli (Australia; 1 chapter)

Stay With You (Germany x Italy; 1 chapter)

UNFINISHED FICS:

Veraverse:

Bésame Mucho (Spain x Romano; 6 chapters so far)

Something To Remember You By (Turkey x Egypt; 1 chapter so far)  note: said to be tragedy

Lily of the Lamplight (Prussia x Austria; 4 chapters so far)  note: trigger warning for attempted sexual assault

Jealousy (Russia x China; 1 chapter so far)  note: trigger warning for violence and assault. also has a big age difference

My Echo (Switzerland x Austria; 1 chapter so far) 

Others:

Catch Perfect (Sweden x Finland; 8 chapters so far)

The Tiger and the Dragon (Russia x China; 4 chapters so far)

Meanwhile, Across Town (Us x Uk; not found - summary, quote)

PLANNED FICS: (all Veraverse; no chapters available for any of these; summaries

Autumn Leaves (Rome x Ancient Greece)

Faraway Places (Bad Touch Trio) 

It’s a Lovely Day Tomorrow (Lithuania x Poland)

Room 504 (Greece x Japan)

Somewhere In France With You (France x Canada) 

When I Grow Too Old To Dream (Sweden x Finland - excerpt)

When The Lights Go On Again (Estonia x Latvia) 

You’ll Never Know (Hungary x Liechtenstein)


I hope this was helpful for anyone wondering. I’m still looking for his fic Meanwhile, Across Town, so if anyone has it will you please let me know? 

And while I still have your attention may I make a brief shout out to anyone new or still in the deValier fandom not to harass George deValier for not finishing these fics please. He’s already written so many beautiful fics, and that takes time and motivation and an insane amount of effort that is done WITHOUT BEING PAID. The last thing he needs is people whining at him about not writing what they want him to write and why he hasn’t updated yet. Now what you can do is compliment him on his beautiful stories and say how much you loved them. 

thank you for your time~   

Here is the lowdown on the history of Elkmont, which has been receiving a lot of attention lately due to a recent online article talking about the “discovery” of a forgotten town in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. The picture you see here was taken in the Daisy Town neighborhood in October of 2012.

Elkmont’s history begins sometime around 1908, when the Little River Logging Company operated in what would soon become the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Prior to the logging outfit’s presence in Elkmont, this little town was a sleepy farming community high in the mountains. The logging company’s actions drastically changed the landscape of the Smokies. They logged the ancient virgin forests and created vast, clear cut areas. Life in Elkmont was not easy, at least not at first. The economy now revolved around the lumber industry and by this time, a railroad, machine shop, post office, homes, and other buildings were built here. Being a logger was dangerous work and included many risks. Elkmont is also the site of a notorious train wreck that happened in 1909 which involved a logging train manned by engineer Gordon A. “Daddy” Bryson. The train lost control on a downhill grade and it derailed, killing both men. During the 1920s, most of the good timber had been harvested from the Smokies. Since the lumber company could no longer cut quality timber in Elkmont, they decided to move elsewhere in search of more timber. The lumber company soon moved operations to Middle Prong, which is upstream from the former town of Tremont. The railroad was removed and a make shift road was put in its place.

In 1910, Elkmont was also a slowly developing resort town that eventually became known as the “Appalachian Club”. Members of this club built many cabins of different architectural styles along a path which started at the Wonderland Club. Elkmont became a well-known destination for tourists who were making their way through the area and the resort provided a rustic charm and comfort for visitors.

In 1926, Congress passed a law which authorized the creation of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park and Elkmont had began another era in its history–from being a logging camp to quaint resort town and to National Park property. The property owners at Elkmont were offered long term leases and the Appalachian and the Wonderland Club were taken by the state and were sold for half their value. The long term leases were relinquished in 1952 for 20 year leases, which would allow enough time to bring electricity to Elkmont. The leases were renewed in 1972 and even though some of the buildings were given longer leases, the last of them expired in 2001. In 1994, Elkmont was added to the National Register of Historic Places.

5

Swisher, Iowa
Population: 879

“Swisher, Iowa had its beginnings on the old Benjamin Swisher homestead by Swisher Creek about 15 miles north of Iowa City, Iowa. Benjamin Swisher had established his farm there in 1841 and added more property as time went by until he had acquired about 600 acres of good land. He first built a log cabin, then a second joined by an entry between them. A barn was built in 1861 and the Forest Oak house around 1862. Benjamin retired from farming in the 1880’s and moved in 1884 with his daughter Catherine (Kate) and her husband Eugene Ballard to Minneapolis, Kansas. Benjamin died in 1885. It is unknown whether anyone in the family worked the farm after Benjamin’s death, but we do know that in 1903 it was decided among his living sons Abram E., Lovell and Stephen that the farm would be platted form the town of Swisher.”