automotive history

View of interior of a 1976 Buick car. Label on sleeve: “General Motors, Buick interior, 1976.”

Courtesy of the National Automotive History Collection, Detroit Public Library

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What a difference 50 years makes AMG was set up in an Affalterbach mill in 1967 as an “engineering office and design and testing centre for the development of racing engines" by Hans-Werner Aufrecht and Erhard Melcher. In 1971, the AMG 300 SEL 6.8 of "Aufrecht and Melcher, Großaspach” (AMG) claimed victory in its class and took second place overall in the 24-hour race at the Circuit de Spa-Francorchamps. Official collaboration with Mercedes-Benz began in 1990 and the C 36 AMG was launched in 1993, the first vehicle to result from the agreement with Daimler-Benz. In 2005, Mercedes-AMG became a wholly owned subsidiary of Daimler-AG and 2009 saw the introduction of the Mercedes-Benz SLS AMG, the first vehicle to be developed entirely by Mercedes-AMG. The week the Mercedes-AMG GT was revised with styling tweaks and performance upgrades as well as the introduction of a new AMG GT C Coupé which celebrates the anniversary year with an exclusive Edition 50 model 

Packard Co. file photograph of a 1912 Packard 30 Model UE on snow-covered road with snow-covered, with male driver and two passengers, 1911 Michigan license plate visible, front view. Inscribed on photo back: “4-cylinder, 40-horsepower, 129.5-inch wheelbase, phaeton, with standard top & Packard storm-tilt windshield, photographed on March 16, 1912, Belle Isle, Detroit, Mich.”

  • Courtesy of the National Automotive History Collection, Detroit Public Library
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Mazda Cosmo HB Series Coupé Rotary Turbo, 1982. Despite the slow selling CD series Mazda persevered with the idea of a luxury grand touring coupe powered by a rotary engine (including a turbo-charged version). The HB Cosmo was also the only model range in automotive history to offer a choice of both petrol and diesel piston engines and a rotary engine. It was the last generation Cosmo to be exported.

View of 1930 Bugatti Royale car in front of stone cottage. Stamped on back: “Greenfield Village and the Henry Ford Museum, Dearborn, Michigan.” Handwritten on back: “1930 Bugatti Royale.”

  • Courtesy of the National Automotive History Collection, Detroit Public Library
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Volkswagen Golf Mk 1, 1974 (and Citi Golf, 2009). Perhaps the most famous and successful of Italdesign’s early years was the original Mk 1 Golf which established the template for Europe’s most popular class of car and whose design continues to influence the style of Golfs up to the present generation. Thus the car became a milestone in automotive history and marked a new beginning for Volkswagen. Although the Mk1 was replaced in Europe in 1983 it remained in production in South Africa as the Citi Golf until 2009

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1932 Ford Model 18

“The Model 18 was the first low-priced, mass-marketed car to have a V8 engine, an important milestone in American automotive history.”

From Wikipedia: The Model B, Model 18 & Model 40 are Ford cars and light trucks produced between 1932 and 1934. They succeeded the Model A. The Model B continued to offer Ford’s proven four cylinder and was available from 1932 to 1934. The V8 (Model 18 in 1932, Model 40 in 1933 & 1934) was succeeded by the Model 48. In Europe, it was built slightly longer. The same bodies were available on both 4 cylinder Model Bs and V8 Model 18/40s. Rather than just a much updated version of the Model A, Ford launched a completely new model for 1932. The V-8 was marketed as the Model 18 in its initial year, and commonly simply called the Ford V‑8. It had the new flathead V‑8 engine. The Model 18 was the first low-priced, mass-marketed car to have a V8 engine, an important milestone in American automotive history.

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Kazumichi Inagawa