auto manufacturers

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Remington Model 11 riot shotgun

Designed and Patented by John Browning c.1898-1900 and manufactured by Remington Arms c.1905-1947 - serial number 465991. This one is a WW2 production.
12 gauge four-shell tubular magazine, long-recoil semi-automatic, hunting scenes engraving.

This gun is kind of an odd one since it presents the US & “shell and flame” grenade engravings as well as Crossed Cannons ordnance proof but does not fit the usual military finish.
An American variant of the Browning Auto 5 manufactured in Belgium since 1902, the Remington Model 11 only entered production in 1905 as the then owner of the company Marcellus Hartley got too excited knowing Browning was in his waiting room with a gun design, and died of a heart attack. Or at least that’s how I see it. This variant differs from the Belgian Auto 5 by lacking a magazine cut-off.

That’s an Auto 5 Police with an 8-round magazine. You’re welcome.

Automakers to gearheads: Stop repairing cars

Automakers are supporting provisions in copyright law that could prohibit home mechanics and car enthusiasts from repairing and modifying their own vehicles.

In comments filed with a federal agency that will determine whether tinkering with a car constitutes a copyright violation, OEMs and their main lobbying organization say cars have become too complex and dangerous for consumers and third parties to handle.

Allowing them to continue to fix their cars has become “legally problematic,” according to a written statement from the Auto Alliance, the main lobbying arm of automakers.

Read More

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Hardtops

General Motors was the first U.S auto manufacturer to mass produce the pillar-less hardtop body style.  GM applied the moniker “Convertible Hardtop” to the 1949;  Buick Roadmaster Riviera, Cadillac Coupe de Ville, Oldsmobile Ninety-Eight Holiday. The term “Convertible Hardtop” was derived from the concept that they would build a convertible and add a permanent hardtop that resembled a convertible with the top up.  The doors would dispense with the fixed metal framing around the door window glass.  This concept was first applied to two door cars and spread to four doors cars and some station wagons. The style became very popular and even struggling Independents had produced their own Hardtop models.  Almost all U.S. Auto Makers had a Hardtop  available by the mid-1950s.

The pillar-less hardtop was significant enough for most car brands to attach a corresponding name (in parenthesis in the image descriptions above) specifically for that body style or top tier model or trim level that was only available as a hardtop body.  Models that were aimed at the economy conscious often did not offer hardtop variants.  Conversely, upper market models would sometimes eliminate sedan versions from the line up.

Hardtop Brand Monikers:

Chevrolet –> Sport Coupe (2 door) Sport Sedan (4 door) confusing the issue since the term sedan was relegated mainly for traditional framed door glass cars. 

Pontiac —-> Catalina

Oldsmobile —-> Holiday

Buick   —-> Riviera

Cadillac  —-> de Ville & Seville

Ford  —-> Victoria

Mercury  —-> Phaeton

Lincoln —->  Landau 

Dodge  —-> Lancer

DeSoto  —-> Sportsman

Chrysler (& 1955 Imperial) —-> Newport

Imperial  —-> Southampton

Rambler  —-> Country Club

Hudson  —-> Hollywood

Studebaker  —-> Starliner

Willys  —-> Eagle

Notice that some of the names would be used again, becoming separate models of their own. (i.e. Catalina, Riviera, Lancer, Newport) or trim packages (i.e. Holiday, Landau)

Visual example of Sedan vs. Hardtop 

1956 Chevrolet 210 Two Door Sedan

1956 Chevrolet Bel Air Four Door Sedan

1956 Chevrolet Hardtops; Bel Air Sport Coupe & 210 Sport Sedan

black history is right around the corner and here is a fun fact. Henry ford was NOT the first person to Make automobiles. A black person was. YES, a black person born into slavery and his name was C.R Patterson. yall thought Henry ford made shit please. BYE!!! His parents were Nancy and Charles Patterson. Patterson escaped from slavery in 1861, heading west and settling in Greenfield, Ohio around 1862. At some point after his arrival in Ohio, Patterson went to work as a blacksmith for the carriage-building business, Dines and Simpson. In 1865 he married Josephine Utz, and had five children from 1866 to 1879. In 1873, Patterson went into partnership with J.P. Lowe, another Greenfield-based carriage manufacturer. Over the next twenty years, Patterson and Lowe developed a highly successful carriage-building business. In 1893 Patterson bought out J.P. Lowe’s share of the business and reorganized it as C.R. Patterson & Sons Company. The company built 28 types of horse-drawn vehicles and employed approximately 10-15 individuals. While the company managed to successfully market its equine-powered carriages and buggies, the dawn of the automobile was rapidly approaching. Charles Patterson died in 1910, leaving the successful carriage business to his son Frederick who in turn initiated the conversion of the company from a carriage business into an automobile manufacturer. The first Patterson-Greenfield car debuted in 1915 and was sold for $850. With a four-cylinder Continental engine, the car was comparable to the contemporary Ford Model T. The Patterson-Greenfield car may, in fact, have been more sophisticated than Ford’s car, but C.R. Patterson & Sons never matched Ford’s manufacturing capability. Estimates of Patterson-Greenfield car production vary, but it is almost certain that no more than 150 vehicles were built. The company soon switched to production of truck, bus, and other utility vehicle bodies which were installed atop chassis made by major auto manufacturers such as Ford and General Motors. Its school bus bodies in particular became popular as Midwestern school districts began to convert from horse-drawn to internal-combustion-fired transportation by 1920. Around 1920, the company reorganized as the Greenfield Bus Body Company but after ten years of steady, if unspectacular growth, the Great Depression sent the company into a downward spiral. Frederick Patterson died in 1932, and the company began to disintegrate in the late 1930s. Around 1938, the company moved to Gallipolis, Ohio, changing its name again to the Gallia Body Company in an attempt to restart its prior success.  The attempt failed and the company permanently closed its doors in 1939.  Like many other small auto manufacturers, the company was unable to compete with Ford, General Motors, Chrysler, and other large automobile manufacturers. No Patterson-Greenfield automobiles are known to have survived to the present, but some C.R. Patterson & Sons carriages and buggies are extant. stay woke loves. THIS AINT IN YALLS SCHOOL BOOK IS IT? ✨✊🏾🌹

My Mom’s Trip!

As yesterday was Mother’s Day and I am over 300 miles away from my mom, I thought I would blog about the last time she visited me, as I am missing her right now! Plus, I got her this card, which I can’t actually give it her!

Easter Weekend 2017

Keeping up with my mom’s spontaneous status (still impressed she spontaneously went to Arizona with me earlier this year!) the Friday before Easter, around 11am, I texted my mom, “I’m not going to Chicago. I’d love a visitor…?” and within seconds she wrote back that she’d leave at noon. God Bless!

I had originally been very uncertain about Easter as I didn’t get any days off for it (I still find this weird!), and was supposed to go to Chicago with M., the guy I was dating at the time, but we last minute cancelled it, as I realized all I wanted to do was hang-out with my mom.

When you go long periods of time away from your home and away from the people you love and know you best, it’s the most remarkably awesome and comforting feeling when suddenly you’re with someone know knows you better than you know yourself. 

The first thing I wanted to show my mom was my CrossFit building. 

My CrossFit building is a 2,200,000-square-foot old auto-body manufacturing factory built in 1925. Today (although it looks empty) is filled with lots of lofts with various businesses running out of them (like woodward, glass blowing, art, and my CrossFit!). It’s very cool. 

My mom and I went in and walked around. It was eerie as there was no one around, but we did find this piece of art in an old hallway.  Some of the doors had over ten locks on them, which I must admit was a little unsettling. 

After walking around for a while we decided to head back to the car, except just as we were approaching the car two girls came up to us and asked, “do you know where the art show is?”  

We had no clue, but then another couple who overheard us pointed to a door and said we should all go, so we did!

We climbed three flights of stairs and found ourselves at a hipster-y art show.  It was so neat! A true Detroit experience for both of us, complete with city views in the distance. 

The rest of her trip was spent showing her my favourite spots. Including, but not limited to: 

Detroit’s historic Corktown (apparently just a few years ago this area wasn’t a safe place with signs everywhere to not leave valuables in cars as they will get broken into. Today it feels incredibly safe, is super charming, with apartments going up all around.) 

We walked around the old train station (with its spiffy new windows and blooms out front)!

And then stepped into a gorgeous little coffee shop called Astro Coffee for lunch. 

Saturday afternoon we strolled around downtown with no plan but to see the city’s sites and architecture. 

I took her to The Belt, a neat little graffiti alleyway

And then we topped off the evening with a gorgeous sunset over the city from Belle Isle!

How lucky I am to have an adventurous mama that was willing to head to Detroit within an hour to keep me company over Easter. 

Happy Mothers Day Mom!! Love you to the moon and back! xoxo

Volkswagen Bus to be revived as an electric vehicle - cancelled in 2013, the classic Volkswagen Camper may find a new lease on life as an eco-friendly EV. The iconic “hippie wagon” may soon see a very apropos resurrection from the dead. Speaking at the New York Auto Show, Volkswagen board member Dr Heinz-Jakob Neusser announced that the German auto company was working on a brand new camper concept - one that would run on batteries, rather than petrol, powering an electric motor driving the front wheels. Dr Neusser said that the new car would maintain 3 iconic design principles of the original Type 2 microbus, first introduced in Germany in 1950. “First the wide, solid, D-Pillar, second the boxy design of the center section; and, third, the front end must have a very short overhang.” In 2011, the company took a stab at an electric concept it called the Bulli, clearly inspired by the Type 2, but closer to a small van, with 4 hinged doors and 1 bench seat in the front and another in the rear that could be folded flat to make a sort of bed. The Camper, in comparison, contains a small mobile home with optional kitchen equipment and detachable canvas tents and awnings; seats that could be folded out into beds; a folding table, and a small refrigeration unit. Production on all VW Type 2 units, incl. the Camper, ceased in 2013. Production had been outsourced to Brazil after safety regulations introduced in the 70s in Germany meant that it could no longer be made there. In 2012, Brazil introduced legislation that went into effect on Jan 1, 2014, dictating that all cars made in the country must have ABS and airbags on both driver and passenger sides. VW decided that, rather than make a completely new vehicle, it was more cost effective to simply say goodbye to the Type 2 after 63 years of production. However, Dr Neusser now said that if the cost of production on the new electric Camper was feasible, the car could make it to market. The VW team continues to work on the concept.

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Federal regulations that allowed for Quad Headlight systems went into effect in 1957. It did present a problem for U.S. Auto Manufacturers, because the four headlight systems were not legal in all states. Each company (sometimes each marque) handled the situation differently.

                Chevrolet  1957 Bel Air & 1958 Impala

GM is the easiest, from Chevrolet to Cadillac all GM cars kept the Dual Headlights system for 1957. When all states legalized the Quad System, in 1958, all GM cars switched from two to four headlights.

                       1957 Cadillac Coupe de Ville

AMC (1957 the last year cars were marketed under Nash & Hudson names) The Nash Ambassador was sold with the vertically stacked Quad system.  The Ambassador does not appear to be an option for states that had not legalized four, other than buying other AMC models that had Dual systems.

                         1957 Hudson Hornet Custom

Ford Motor Company handled it differently for different marques. Continental, Ford regular line and Thunderbird kept using Dual headlights.  Most Mercury cars used two headlights, but the new flashy Turnpike Cruiser used an obviously adapted Quad system.  Lincoln went another way. It looked like a vertically stacked Quad system, but in reality was the dual standard nine inch headlights. The lower lights were “Road Lights”.


                                1957 Ford Thunderbird

Chrysler Corporation also used a mix of tricks to handle the situation. The upper echelon marques: Imperial, Chrysler and DeSoto offered their cars with Dual or Quad systems. (Chrysler & DeSoto examples above) Dodge and Plymouth, on the other hand, used Dual headlights, but positioned and disguised parking lights to give the illusion of Quad headlights.

Studebaker/Packard was struggling and did not have the resources to handle dealing with the mixed regulations and would hold off adapting their designs for  Quad headlights until 1958.

Depending on the response this post gets, a follow up on what happened in 1958 when four headlights became legal in all states may be assembled.

anonymous asked:

As far as presidents go where would you rate Barack Hussein Obama? Some have stated he's the best president, some have stated he's the worst. To be honest it's mostly white people saying he's the worst which makes no sense when you look at American history and toxic waste like Reagan and Dubya. So based on the details of what the man has accomplished and his failings based on every other president where do you put the man?

Obama was great for Israel, Weapons Manufactures, the Auto Industry, the International Bankers, Wall Street (Institutional Investors), the Saudi Royal Family, the Tech Monopolies, For-Profit Insurance Industry, ISIL…

Obama was good for the (mainstream) Gay Rights Movement, the Negro Elites, Affluent White Liberals, Big Coal, the Struggling Nuclear Power Industry, NATO, Central & South American Oligarchs, Bio-tech Firms, Military Contractors, (mainstream) Feminist, African Oligarchs…

Obama has been a catastrophe for the Black masses (the African Diaspora and Continental Africans), the world’s ecosystems, endangered species (plant & animals), Whistle Blowers, Investigative Journalism, Social Justice Movements (Occupy/BLM), the Global Anti-War Movement, Haiti, Public Education, the Single-Payer Healthcare Struggle, Palestine, The Bolivarian Revolution, World Peace (he ignited a new Cole War)….

So, overall Obama is Great, Good, or Bad depending on where you fall in the Racial, Class, and Ideological spectrum. 

No president can be favored by all, in a nation and a world full of competing and conflicting interest; presidents, just like the rest of us, have to pic a side.  Obama picked and repped his side hard.  Obama is on the side of Empire, Capitalist Class, the Elites, and the Status Quo.

I’m Black, Poor, Socialist, Pro-Peace, Pro-Justice, and Pan-African so for me, the Obama Administration and his policies have been horrible, not the worst, but far as fuck from the best, way far; like Nixon was better than Obama, seriously.  Obama is as bad as Woodrow Wilson, not as Racist, but just as manipulative, warmongering, and elitist as Wilson. 

What saves Obama, Bush, Clinton and many other modern presidents is that there were presidents who owned slaves, who would openly rape African women, father Black children, then sell those children on the auction block; it’s kinda hard for post-Emancipation presidents to top that level of evil in the modern era, but it ain’t for lack of trying. 

As for me personally, excluding the POTUS’s that were elected during Chattel Enslavement of my ancestors, I would say Obama was the worst for one primary reason: Cuz He Black, and should fucking know/do better!  I have higher expectations for my own people, no matter how often I’m left down, I still do.  So, to see a Black man behaving like a White man is worse than a White man doing White man things; but that’s just my own bias. 


So, you have both my objective and subjective assessment of Obama’s Administration.

I will be glad when he’s out of office and I hope no other Black man ascends to the helm of the US Empire, I hope the Empire collapses or is dismantled long before then.   

1938 Auto Union Type D | Grand Prix Racing Car | 3.0L V12 478hp | Top Speed 340 kph 211 mph

Auto Union Grand Prix Racing Car | 1933 - 1939 | The race cars were developed and built by the r Racing Department of Auto Union’s Horch Works in Zwickau, Germany | In 1932 Auto Union Gmbh was formed, comprising struggling auto manufacturers Audi, DKW, Horch and Wanderer

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Cars of 1958 Part II:

After WWII auto manufacturers were scrambling to fill the demand for new cars, since auto production had stopped early in 1942.  Early in the 1950’s a price war between Chevrolet and Ford started to squeeze out the independent car companies.  Nash & Hudson merged to form American Motors Corporation and Studebaker & Packard merged into one company.

The sellers market had dried up by the mid-fifties and an economic downturn in 1958, that became known as the Eisenhower Recession, hit the automotive market hard.  The recently expanding middle price car territory took the biggest hit, effecting Pontiac, Oldsmobile, Buick, Dodge, Chrysler, Mercury.  It was a fatal blow for DeSoto and  Ford’s new entry into the field the Edsel.

The period did produce some of the most extravagant and glitzy cars ever produced.  If you want to see more cars from 1958, click the link below:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/greggjerdingen/sets/72157647608547903/

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Cars of 1958 Part I:

After WWII auto manufacturers were scrambling to fill the demand for new cars, since auto production had stopped early in 1942.  Early in the 1950’s a price war between Chevrolet and Ford started to squeeze out the independent car companies.  Nash & Hudson merged to form American Motors Corporation and Studebaker & Packard merged into one company.

The sellers market had dried up by the mid-fifties and an economic downturn in 1958, that became known as the Eisenhower Recession, hit the automotive market hard.  The recently expanding middle price car territory took the biggest hit, effecting Pontiac, Oldsmobile, Buick, Dodge, Chrysler, Mercury.  It was a fatal blow for DeSoto and  Ford’s new entry into the field the Edsel.

The period did produce some of the most extravagant and glitzy cars ever produced.  If you want to see more cars from 1958, click the link below:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/greggjerdingen/sets/72157647608547903/

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In 1958, the French auto manufacturer Simca gave the world the Gallic vision of the car of the year 2000 in the Fulgur concept vehicle. The French Retrofuture, like its American cousin, seemed to have a fixation on cars with bubble canopies that would do little to eliminate the heat and glare of the sun, as well as panels that extend virtually to the ground, all but guaranteeing scraping the car’s body.

15 Mind-Blowing Facts That You Should Read (Part 140)

1. The skeleton called the “Ring Lady” unearthed in Herculaneum near Pompeii. 79 AD

2. when watermelons are grilled or baked they lose their granular texture and can even be used as meat substitute, a “watermelon steak”.

3. There is a fine dining restaurant located inside a gas station in Texas. Sometime around 2003, Nigerian born Franson Nwaeze was denied a bank loan to open a restaurant. Undeterred, Franson applied for a loan to open a gas station instead, which the bank approved. The result: Chef Point.

4.  Japanese convenience store clerks throw giant paintballs at criminals who try to rob them. The ‘crime prevention color balls’ burst on impact to make…

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WHY WE MUST END UPWARD PRE-DISTRIBUTIONS TO THE RICH

 You often hear inequality has widened because globalization and technological change have made most people less competitive, while making the best educated more competitive.

There’s some truth to this. The tasks most people used to do can now be done more cheaply by lower-paid workers abroad or by computer-driven machines.

But this common explanation overlooks a critically important phenomenon: the increasing concentration of political power in a corporate and financial elite that has been able to influence the rules by which the economy runs.

As I argue in my new book, “Saving Capitalism: For the Many, Not the Few” (out this week), this transformation has amounted to a pre-distribution upward.

Intellectual property rights—patents, trademarks, and copyrights—have been enlarged and extended, for example, creating windfalls for pharmaceutical companies.

Americans now pay the highest pharmaceutical costs of any advanced nation.

At the same time, antitrust laws have been relaxed for corporations with significant market power, such as big food companies, cable companies facing little or no broadband competition, big airlines, and the largest Wall Street banks.

As a result, Americans pay more for broadband Internet, food, airline tickets, and banking services than the citizens of any other advanced nation.

Bankruptcy laws have been loosened for large corporations—airlines, automobile manufacturers, even casino magnates like Donald Trump—allowing them to leave workers and communities stranded.

But bankruptcy has not been extended to homeowners burdened by mortgage debt or to graduates laden with student debt. Their debts won’t be forgiven.

The largest banks and auto manufacturers were bailed out in 2008, shifting the risks of economic failure onto the backs of average working people and taxpayers.

Contract laws have been altered to require mandatory arbitration before private judges selected by big corporations. Securities laws have been relaxed to allow insider trading of confidential information.

CEOs now use stock buybacks to boost share prices when they cash in their own stock options.

Tax laws have special loopholes for the partners of hedge funds and private-equity funds, special favors for the oil and gas industry, lower marginal income-tax rates on the highest incomes, and reduced estate taxes on great wealth.

Meanwhile, so-called “free trade” agreements, such as the pending Trans Pacific Partnership, give stronger protection to intellectual property and financial assets but less protection to the labor of average working Americans.

Today, nearly one out of every three working Americans is in a part-time job. Many are consultants, freelancers, and independent contractors. Two-thirds are living paycheck to paycheck.

And employment benefits have shriveled. The portion of workers with any pension connected to their job has fallen from just over half in 1979 to under 35 percent today.

Labor unions have been eviscerated. Fifty years ago, when General Motors was the largest employer in America, the typical GM worker, backed by a strong union, earned $35 an hour in today’s dollars.

Now America’s largest employer is Walmart, and the typical entry-level Walmart worker, without a union, earns about $9 an hour. 

More states have adopted so-called “right-to-work” laws, designed to bust unions. The National Labor Relations Board, understaffed and overburdened, has barely enforced collective bargaining.

All of these changes have resulted in higher corporate profits, higher returns for shareholders, and higher pay for top corporate executives and Wall Street bankers – and lower pay and higher prices for most other Americans.

They amount to a giant pre-distribution upward to the rich. But we’re not aware of them because they’re hidden inside the market.

The underlying problem, then, is not just globalization and technological changes that have made most American workers less competitive. Nor is it that they lack enough education to be sufficiently productive.

The more basic problem is that the market itself has become tilted ever more in the direction of moneyed interests that have exerted disproportionate influence over it, while average workers have steadily lost bargaining power—both economic and political—to receive as large a portion of the economy’s gains as they commanded in the first three decades after World War II.

Reversing the scourge of widening inequality requires reversing the upward pre-distributions within the rules of the market, and giving average people the bargaining power they need to get a larger share of the gains from growth.

The answer to this problem is not found in economics. It is found in politics. Ultimately, the trend toward widening inequality in America, as elsewhere, can be reversed only if the vast majority join together to demand fundamental change.

The most important political competition over the next decades will not be between the right and left, or between Republicans and Democrats. It will be between a majority of Americans who have been losing ground, and an economic elite that refuses to recognize or respond to its growing distress. 

Short Term Thinking.

The most frustrating thing to me about Modest and HJPR is that their marketing is very short sighted - the boys have huge talent and have proved it with the new more grown-up album, but he marketing is all aimed at little girls.  My theory is that they see boy-bands as a 3-6 year viability, so why bother with real long term marketing strategy.  I believe 1D has what it takes to make the transition to an adult fan base, but adults, unfortunately, are not nearly as lucrative as teen girls.

Looking at the chemistry the boys have and their talent - how well the SNL appearance was received - etc. the pieces are there to be going strong 20 years from now.  Management and PR are like day traders, looking to make a killing in the market right now while wise investors are looking 10-20 years ahead (and in the long term, those wise investors usually come out on top.)

Simon/Syco have also done a poor job.  I’ve never seen the boys live, but I’ve heard many good recordings of them live.  Why did the first two albums sound like a bunch of auto-tune, manufactured, process cheese when the boys live sound fantastic?  Their 5 distinct voices blend and compliment so beautifully, but on the albums they all seem interchangeable.  The latest album is much better, but I still think they would be better as close to live as possible - why cover up such tremendous talent?

We all know that they are going to be with Syco for a while now.  I just hope and pray that we are in the final days/weeks of HJPR and Modest.  All the networking Harry has been doing seems to point toward a new “Direction” in management - let’s hope so.

Origins of the Silver Arrows

1934 Auto Union Type A | Grand Prix Racing Car | 4.3L 45º V16 295hp | Top Speed 275 kph 171 mph

Auto Union Grand Prix Racing Car | 1933 - 1939 | The race cars were developed and built by the r Racing Department of Auto Union’s Horch Works in Zwickau, Germany | In 1932 Auto Union Gmbh was formed, comprising struggling auto manufacturers Audi, DKW, Horch and Wanderer