autistic fixations

10 WAYS TO HELP AUTISTIC PEOPLE [BY AN AUTISTIC PERSON]:
  1. Be aware of your surroundings. Bright lights and too much noise are hell for autistic people. Is there anywhere quiet or dim that you could take them to if they got stressed? Is there a way to lessen the noise and/or brightness?
  2. Don’t tell us to “stop acting weird”. Chewing on things, flapping our hands, rocking on our feet, and so on are all natural, healthy behaviours that help us to process emotion and sensory input. Telling us not to do them is akin to telling an allistic (non-autistic) person to stop smiling.
  3. Most autistic people are happy as we are. Some would rather not be autistic, it’s true, but most of us just want to be ourselves without shame or stigma. It’s generally bad manners to talk to us about a “cure” or “treatments” for who we are.
  4. Non-verbal communication – vocal sounds, text or written communication, sign language, etc – are all valid forms of communication which we sometimes have to use. (Or always have to use, in some cases.) Sometimes, we have to text the person sitting next to us because we can’t talk. Please don’t try to make us use our voices when we’d rather not!
  5. Research autistic groups before supporting them. What do actual autistic people say about this group? We like self-advocacy groups, we don’t like allistic people trying to talk for us. Not every group that claims to help autistic people is actually our friend!
  6. Special interests – things which autistic people fixate on and obsess over – are healthy and important. Don’t make fun of us for getting really into things, even if they’re “childish” things like Minecraft or Pokémon. It’s incredibly hurtful when someone we like just dismisses our interests without a second thought.
  7. When an autistic person is having a meltdown or shutdown, listen to them! Don’t fuss over them or get up in their face. Just listen to what they want you to do to help them, if anything. Let them write or text it, if they have to, and keep your voice down!
  8. We don’t process the world the same way you do. Sometimes things which seem obvious to you require explanation before we’ll understand them. Sometimes an explanation you understand will be one that makes no sense to us. Please be patient. We’re not being difficult on purpose! We want to understand, we really do.
  9. Be understanding when we say we can’t do something. Our energy gets used up a lot quicker than yours. Often we’d really like to do something, but we just can’t, and it can be difficult for us to explain that. Don’t guilt trip us for not going out or whatever – we already feel really bad about it!
  10. Listen to our boundaries. If we don’t want to be touched, don’t touch us. If we want you to leave our possessions alone, leave them alone. If we aren’t up to talking, don’t try to make us talk. We need boundaries a lot more than you do, so please try to respect them. It’s common courtesy!

[I originally posted this on Facebook, but I decided to post it here, too.]

Autism Vs Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder: Is This ASD or PTSD ?

@askaboutautism and @undiagnosedautismfeels have gotten quite a few questions regarding autism and PTSD, specifically ones asking about the differences and how to tell if you’re autistic if you’ve also got PTSD. I had troubling finding resources that clearly laid out how the two could look like each other, and also what the differences were when I was first researching autism. It make figuring things out rather difficult. I also got a positive response when asking if anyone would be interested in a post like this, so as an autistic with PTSD, I’ve written up this post.

This post is written with PTSD caused by chronic or long-term trauma (often called Complex or C-PTSD, but is not officially recognized as a dx in the DSM 5) in mind, and obviously influenced by my PTSD. My official dx is PTSD (chronic per the DSM IV and still included on my records as of 2017 for some reason) with dissociative symptoms.

So, here’s the Diagnostic criteria for Autism Spectrum Disorder pulled off the CDC website. With examples of both how PTSD could resemble the ASD criteria, and how being autistic would fulfill the criteria. These are by no means exhaustive or iron-clad, they are simply a starting point.

Keep reading

Can yall edgy 13 y/o tumblr fucks stop self diagnosing yourself with autism like… It takes so much to be disgnosed and generally real autistic people and especially Children have to see special doctors multiple times a month and deserve to not be made light of. Stop draining resources and setting false examples of what autism looks like.
You’re not autistic just because you like stim videos.
You’re not autistic because you fixate on specific celebrities or things.
You’re not autistic because you’re “kin” with like Brendon Urie or some shit.
Not to say that someone who is autistic can’t love stimming and be hyper fixated on the Walking Dead or something, but this post isnt necessarily about Real autistic people.
It’s about you fucking weirdos with special interests in things and people that self dianose as autistic. That’s not what autism is. That’s just very rude. And actually, pretty fucked up.

Everyone acts like they’re so understanding of the symptoms of autism in people, being sure not to treat people badly for having “uncommon” special interests, and not making fun of people on the spectrum for their various quirks or social difficulties. And that’s good! No person should be made fun of for obsessing over a specific interest or character or anything, especially with ASD.

But once autistic people develop or fixate on “weird” or unusual sexual fetishes (the harmless kind like vore, inflation, bondage, transformation, more obscure stuff, etc etc), they’re suddenly FAIR GAME for public mocking, ridicule, judgement, shaming, and hatred.

So like yeah cool guys way to pick and choose which autistic traits are “funny” or not and which ways their sexuality develops (whether it be asexuality or the total opposite) are acceptable and which you can ridicule.