autism-awarness

PSA to our followers this Autism Acceptance Month:
  • Use Autism **Acceptance** Month (as opposed to Autism Awareness Month).
  • NO “light it up blue” or puzzle pieces. Google “Autism Speaks hate group” to learn more.
  • Use red or gold instead, which are colors supported by the autistic community.
  • Use identity-first language (most autistic people prefer “autistic” instead of “person with autism”), but don’t police the language of someone who prefers to be called a person with autism.
  • NO scare terms like “suffering with autism” or “afflicted with autism.”
  • Avoid functioning labels like “high functioning” or “low functioning.”
  • If autistic voices are not at the center of your efforts, you’re doing it wrong.
  • When in doubt, ASK AN AUTISTIC PERSON. 
  • To learn more about autism, visit autistic-run organizations like the Autistic Self Advocacy Network (ASAN) and Autism Women’s Network (AWN).
Fellow members of the autistic community

I’m at my local library and they’ve made a display for autism awareness month. This is a well meant effort, but… 

As you can see, they’ve gone with the “autism speaks” motif. This is somewhat distressing for me, especially since I usually come here to de-stress. I’m going to write a letter for the library about why this is offensive to me as an autistic person, but I don’t want them to think it’s just me wigging out about it, so if you all would be so kind I’d appreciate it if you could reblog this post and add your own thoughts on autism speaks and the symbols of their organisation. I’m going to print off as many responses as I can and hand them over to the library along with the letter. 

Thanks so much for your time, and I hope you all have a good autism awareness month

Autism Awareness Month

April is Autism awareness month and I just wanted to tell all of you to NOT support Autism Speaks Because they don’t care about Autistic people.

If you want to support an organization that actually DOES support Autistic people show some Support for ASAN (Autistic Self Advocacy Network) & The Autism Women’s Network

Both of these organizations were founded by Autistic People by Autistic People where as Autism Speaks doesn’t have Autistic people in their so called organization

ASAN can be followed on Tumblr @autisticadvocacy 

AWN  can be followed on Tumblr @autisticwomen

Disabled people’s lives are not tragedies.
Parents and carers are not “heroes” for loving disabled people.
Disabled people’s private moments should not be shared without consent on your “warrior mom” blog.
Disabled people are not your pity hires, dates, or friends.
Disabled people do not exist to be saved or spoken for by non-disabled people.

Treat disabled people with respect and dignity.
Treat disabled people like people.

youtube

This Month is Autism Acceptance Month and many of you have requested this, so I’m super happy to be able to take time to sit down with some friends and educate myself on the autism community! This was an absolutely wonderful chat and I hope you enjoy as much as I did! Through the video, I make mention of “Autism Awareness” at the time of the recording, I was unaware of the more accepted term, “autism acceptance”, so I apologize!! I’m very happy to learn and use this term from here on out, so thank you for letting me know!! There are still many things I’m learning, so thank you for bearing with me as I continue to educate myself!

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Hey, so this was a project I did last semester - designing an infographic for an organization of our own choice. So I chose @autisticadvocacy - Autistic Self Advocacy Network. This is free to use and spread around. And please do, considering it’s April and so “Light It Up Blue” shit is going around.

  A link to view and download it (as a pdf) can be found here. (If you want to print it.)

I’m just worried about what’s going to happen once neurotypical people get tired of them bc it’s not just some pop culture trend for people “have fun” with like stimming actually helps those with autism and ADHD/ADD?? And fidget spinners and fidget cubes were made for that specific purpose. And I’m not trying to condemn neurotypical people using fidget tools I just wish the trend would help bring attention to the fact that stimming is something helpful

listen as someone on the autistic spectrum, I can’t express how happy I am with Billy Cranston as a character.

A lot of the representation of autism/Aspergers I’ve seen in the media has been people who are typically cold/casually insult people/being pushed away or looked down on/overall just pretty negative.

But Billy Cranston..he is a beautiful soul. The biggest stereotype of people on the autistic spectrum is that we “don’t have feelings” or are “really apathetic”. Yeah a lot of us have difficulty understanding other people but that’s because our brains just function differently like a lot of us really do try to understand others because we want people to understand us! And when we see characters that have autistic traits (a lot of the time we don’t get characters that are canonically autistic so we have to look for our representation through characters with traits) being rude and deliberately dismissive of other people’s feelings (a certain detective and a scientist from two highly overrated shows come to mind😒) it’s really harmful to us and supports those stereotypes.

Billy Cranston is not dismissive and rude. He is full of love for his friends. He tries to understand the people around him, probably because a lot of people in a small town don’t try to understand him.

Yes his “quirks” are played for laughs a lot but it’s in no way offensive and is genuinely funny (I mean to me anyway, there were a lot of things he does in the film that I’m guilty of, like not understanding social queues and keep talking and not realising I’m repeating things).

And finally Power Rangers does something with Billy Cranston and his autism that a lot of movies/TV shows don’t do with their autistic characters (if there are any) and that is unapologetically celebrate him. To me, Billy was the heart and soul of the movie.

So can we please have more autistic characters that aren’t rude white man-children who’s disabilities are played for laughs, thanks.

It’s not appropriative to stand up against Autism Speaks or do #REDinstead

Like, please do so.

Autistic people are, too often, fighting a culture of hate and dehumanization on our own. It’s hardest when everyone is saying these things about you. And it’s just. so. tiring.

Yes, please stand up for us.

Yes, please post that cute selfie of you wearing red.

Yes, please link ignorant people to descriptions of why “Light it up blue” is harmful.

Yes, please draw a picture for autism acceptance month. It would make an autistic person’s day.

It’s lonely fighting stigma alone. And it really hurts, especially when it feels like no one else cares about us. The blue lights and sob stories and talk about cures just isolates us.

If someone who cared would be willing to reach out, to say something, to make it stop… it would mean the world.

a quick thing for Autism Acceptance Day/Month!!

how to support autistic people this month:

  • don’t support Autism Speaks – it’s an awful “charity” that harms autistic people more than it helps them
  • do support organisations run by and for autistic people, such as the Autistic Self-Advocacy Network ( @autisticadvocacy​ ) and the Autism Women’s Network ( @autisticwomen​ )
  • don’t “light it up blue” for “autism awareness” – these things are heavily associated with Autism Speaks, and with the dangerous misconceptions it spreads about autism
  • do use the hashtag #RedInstead to fight back against #LightItUpBlue
  • do promote and celebrate autism acceptance (not just awareness!)

and, most importantly:

  • do listen to what actual autistic people have to say – we know better than our family members, “autism experts”, or any non-autistic person!!
i.
“but you don’t look autistic”
i know, it’s shocking
i’m sure you were expecting scaly green skin
or another pair of eyes hidden beneath my bangs
but take a look
two legs, two arms, on pair of eyes
i look just like you
i look like a human
because that’s what i am
autism does not have a costume
our wardrobe isn’t embroidered with puzzle pieces and the color blue
funnily enough
like everyone else on this earth
people with autism are all different
our experiences are not stagnate across the globe 
and just because i can disguise my stims
doesn’t mean i am more or less autistic than someone who cannot
and believe it or not
saying that is not a compliment

ii.
yes
autistic people can have jobs
we can be loved by someone other than our family members
we can drive
and go shopping
not all of us are nonverbal
and while most of us cannot handle the horrors of eye contact
and certain stimuli
  once again
we’re all different
try not to act so surprised when we’re able to appear just as neurotypical as you

iii.
“oh, so you’re like Rain Man?”
if this is your way of implying that you can drop a bunch of toothpicks on the ground and then ask me how many there are
kindly fuck off

iv.
“autism is a disease and i’m sure they’ll find a cure for you”
we are not sick
we are not suffering
illnesses are contagious
you can’t catch autism
it isn’t going to spread if you get too close to me
this isn’t rocket science
it isn’t that hard to understand
you either have autism
or you never will
and more importantly
there is nothing about us that needs to be cured

v.
instead of listening to a fear mongering
hate spreading
poor representation
unsupportive
harmful group that markets itself on our existence and feels the need to “fix” autistic people
why not just listen to autistic people instead?
—  Five Myths / Things You Should Know About People with Autism
(cc, 2017)

Does anyone else get the thing where if you’re watching a TV show you genuinely can’t handle any chaos or drama, like if a character messes something up I find it so frustrating, even though I know it’s written for comedy purposes or plot development

It means I’ve skipped scenes, episodes, or even a full season of shows to avoid having to rewatch all the chaos

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April is National Autism Awareness Month, and April 2 is World Autism Awareness Day. Blue lights will be everywhere to raise awareness of the condition that, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, affects 1 in 68 kids. “Sesame Street” is debuting Julia, a Muppet who has autism, April 10.

While the increased awareness is great, we’d also like to think of it as a time for greater acceptance and understanding of those with autism. So in honor of kids (and adults) with this neurological disorder that can affect social skills, speech and language and motor skills, we asked five of our contributors to tell us what makes their child with autism awesome.

Read more here: What our children with autism have taught us: Love with abandon, and laugh at yourself