autism disorder

anonymous asked:

Is being under-stimulated kind of like feeling dissociated? Like everything feels weird or empty and you just kind of want to throw your entire body through a window 'cuz everything feels so off? Idk how to explain it but kind of like that? It feels like my whole body is itching, you know?

Hmm, that seems like a good way to describe it sometimes. Like your mind is static and you just… exist, kinda. #theworst

You are not “unnatural” or “bad” if you 

  • Have low to no empathy
  • Have hyper-empathy 
  • Have a personality disorder
  • Have more than one person in your mind
  • Have scary/violent thoughts
  • Don’t have the energy for interaction every day
  • Can’t take a shower/brush your teeth very often
  • Don’t like certain noises/textures
  • Don’t want to forgive them
  • Know you did nothing wrong
  • Love yourself 
Auditory Processing Problems

• *someone says something* “what?” *repeats themselves* “sorry?” *repeats themselves again* “pardon?”

•"hey, y'see the red thing at the top of the shelf, will you get it?“ "Sorry, what?” “On the sh-” “oh yeah sure, I’ll get it.”

•*doesn’t hear teacher because someone’s pen is making a scratchy sound at the back of the room*

•*replays video 10 ten times to figure out what they’re saying*

•teachers asking, “why do you always stop writing in the middle of a sentence, just write down whatever I’m saying,” followed by the response, “I’m just processing it,” rebuked by, “we’ll stop processing it and just write.”

•*gets really focused on staring out the window and goes through four songs without hearing a single on*

Friendly reminder: This is what Trump thinks of Autistic people

“I’ll tell you what autism is. In 99 percent of the cases, it’s a brat who hasn’t been told to cut the act out. That’s what autism is. What do you mean they scream and they’re silent? They don’t have a father around to tell them, ‘Don’t act like a moron. You’ll get nowhere in life. Stop acting like a putz. Straighten up. Act like a man. Don’t sit there crying and screaming, idiot.” 

— Mike Savage, Trump’s appointment to head the NIH

In light of the Betsy DeVos confirmation,

Some tips for how to help:

  • Call schools and ask if you can pay off lunch balances.
  • Find reputable after-school programs that need volunteers or financial donations.
  • Donate school supplies! Even cheap notebooks and pencils can make a difference.
  • Love the kiddos in your lives. Tell them they matter. Listen to their stories; refuse to write them off as kids who just don’t know anything about the world and are just being dramatic/millennials who are always glued to their phones and so on.
  • When in doubt, call your local schools and ask what you can do. Every school has different needs, but they all need our help.

My heart breaks for my educator friends.
My heart breaks for parents of K-12 children.
My heart breaks for underprivileged, disabled, and otherwise marginalized children who will not be able to access an equitable education over the next few years (even more so than they already weren’t), who will be told in word and deed that their mere presence in the system is a burden.
My heart breaks.

9

@actuallyadhd

[Image Descriptions:

All slides have a light blue background, and the text is written in blue rectangles with rounded corners.

Slide 1: The title is in white text inside a dark blue circle that is centred in the slide.

Sensory Overload And how to cope

Slide 2: The header is in a dark blue rectangle and white text, and the body is in a pale blue rectangle and black text.

Sensory overload has been found to be associated with disorders such as:

  • Fibromyalgia (FM)
  • Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS)
  • Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
  • Autistic spectrum disorders
  • Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD)
  • Synesthesia

Slide 3: The text is in three pale blue rectangles that go horizontally across the slide. All use black text. The last rectangle has four smaller dark blue rectangles with white text inside it for the four points. The text is centred in all of the rectangles.

Sensory overload occurs when one (or more) of the body’s senses experiences over-stimulation from the environment.

Basically it feels like everything is happening at once, and is happening too fast for you to keep up with.

Sensory overload can result from the overstimulation of any of the senses.

Hearing: Loud noise or sound from multiple sources, such as several people talking at once.

Sight: Bright lights, strobe lights, or environments with lots of movement such as crowds or frequent scene changes on TV.

Smell and Taste: Strong aromas or spicy foods.

Touch: Tactile sensations such as being touched by another person or the feel of cloth on skin.

Slide 4: A heading in two light blue rectangles with black text, followed by a table with a dark blue first row that has white text, and then alternating pale blue and white rows with black text. (The table is not really a table, it is just a four-column list.)

Obviously, everyone reacts in differently to sensory overload.

Some behavioural examples are:

Irritability — “Shutting down” — Covers eyes around bright lights — Difficulty concentrating
Angry outbursts — Refuses to interact and participate — Covers ears to close out sounds or voices — Jumping from task to task without completing
Overexcitement — Low energy levels — Difficulty speaking — Compains about noises not effecting others
High energy levels — Sleepiness/fatigue — poor eye contact — Overly sensitive to sounds/lights/touch
Fidgeting and restlessness — Avoids touching/being touched — Muscle tension — Difficulty with social interactions

Slide 5: The header is in a dark blue box with pointy corners and white text. The body is in a pale blue box with pointy corners and black text.

There are two different methods to prevent sensory overload: avoidance and setting limits:

  • Create a more quiet and orderly environment - keeping the noise to a minimum and reducing the sense of clutter.
  • Rest before big events.
  • Focus your attention and energy on one thing at a time.
  • Restrict time spent on various activities.
  • Select settings to avoid crowds and noise.
  • One may also limit interactions with specific people to help prevent sensory overload.

Slide 6: This looks the same as the last slide except the text in the header is black.

It is important in situations of sensory overload to calm oneself and return to a normal level.

  • Remove yourself from the situation.
  • Deep pressure against the skin combined with proprioceptive input that stimulates the receptors in the joints and ligaments often calms the nervous system.
  • Reducing sensory input such as eliminating distressing sounds and lowering the lights can help.
  • Calming, focusing music works for some.
  • Take an extended rest if a quick break doesn’t relieve the problem.

Slide 7: Four light blue rectangles with rounded corners, stacked one above the other, with black text.

What if someone you know is experiencing sensory overload?

Recognize the onset of overload. If they appear to have lost abilities that they usually have, such as forgetting how to speak, this is often a sign of severe overload.

Reduce the noise level. If they are in a noisy area, offer to guide them somewhere more quiet. Give time to process questions and respond, because overload tends to slow processing. If you can control the noise level, for example by turning off music, do so.

Do not touch or crowd them. Many people in SO are hypersensitive to touch - being touched or thinking they are about to be touched can worsen the overload. If they are seated or are a small child, get down to their level instead of looming above them.

Slide 8: Similar to previous slide, only with three rectangles instead of four.

Don’t talk more than necessary. Ask if you need to in order to help, but don’t try to say something reassuring or get them talking about something else. Speech is sensory input, and can worsen overload.

If they have a jacket, they may want to put it on and put the hood up. This helps to reduce stimulation, and many people find the weight of a jacket comforting. If their jacket is not within reach, ask them if they want you to bring it. A heavy blanket can also help in a similar way.

Don’t react to aggression. Don’t take it personally. It is rare for someone who is overloaded to cause serious harm, because they don’t want to hurt you, just get out of the situation. Aggression often occurs because you tried to touched/restrained/blocked their escape.

Slide 9: Similar to previous slide, only with two rectangles instead of three.

When they have calmed down, be aware that they will often be tired and more susceptible to overload for quite awhile afterwards. It can take hours or days to fully recover from an episode of sensory overload. If you can, try to reduce stress occurring later on as well.

If they start self-injuring, you should usually not try to stop them. Restraint is likely to make their overload worse. Only intervene if they are doing something that could cause serious injury, such as hard biting or banging their head. It’s a lot better to deal with self-injury indirectly by lowering overload.

Slide 10: The header is in a dark blue rectangle with white text, and the other text is in a row of five dark blue circles with white text. The text is centred in all shapes.

To summarise - Remember the 5 R’s

Recognise
The symptoms of overload

Remove
Yourself from the situation

Reduce
the stimulus causing the overload

Relax
Your body and calm yourself down

Rest
Yourself as you will most likely feel fatigue.]

Stop demonizing people with low empathy 2k16

Stop assuming that all people with low empathy are assholes who don’t give a damn 2k16

Stop saying that people with low empathy are hurtful to others because of bad intentions 2k16

Stop pretending that people with low empathy don’t have any sense of right and wrong 2k16

Stop equating low empathy with being sadistic 2k16

Having low empathy is not a choice. Empathy is not something you can learn. But that doesn’t mean they are assholes or anything else, or that they want to hurt others.

Newt Scamander is on the autism spectrum no?

1) he rarely makes eye contact
2) he relates better to animals than people
3) extremely literal and logical
4) has a hard time making friends
6) collecting and categorizing a single interest to the point of impacting his life and relationships
7) He seems uncomfortable with emotions except when with animals. When he is able to connect emotionally with humans, its the outcasts like himself.
8) He doesn’t acknowledge rules that don’t fit his logic. Not in a “I’m a badass the rules don’t apply to me" way but a “does not compute” sort of way

Maybe I’m seeing what I want to see but I LOVE THIS. Visibility makes me happy :)

Autistic Lifehack: Hearing Problems

If someone says something that you only partially understand:

DON’T ask for clarification with a generic “What?” or “I’m sorry?” (In my experience, people will repeat the phrase the exact same way without helping you to understand).

Example:
Them: “Hey, do you like pahganabasa?”
Autistic Person: “What?”
Them: “Do you like pahganabasa?”
Autistic Person: “I’m sorry, what?”
Them (annoyed): “Do you like pahganabasa?”

Instead, DO repeat the part that you did understand, and substitute a “What?” for the unintelligable part.

Example:
Them: “Hey, do you like pahganabasa?”
Autistic Person: “Do I like what?”
Them: “Pineapple pizza?”
Autistic Person: (Understands the words!)

Shoutout to the autistics with ADHD. The autistics who don’t know how to distinguish between ADHD symptoms and autism symptoms.

Shoutout to the autistics with mental illness. The autistics who’s mental illness and autism symptoms overlap and exacerbate each other.

Shoutout to the autistics with personality disorders. Those who feel invalid because others say you can’t have both.

Shoutout to the autistics who have comorbid conditions. It can be confusing and hard to work out. It can be difficult to manage when your symptoms overlap and play off each other.

You are strong. You are magnificent. You are valid.

What are the odds?

Less than 1% of the world’s population have gender dysphoria

Less than 1% of the world’s population have kleptomania 

Less than 1% of the world’s population have schizophrenia

Less than 1% of the world’s population suffers autism

Less than 2% of the world’s population have multiple-personality disorder

Less than 1% of the world’s population have delusional disorder.

Less than 8% of the world’s population are homosexual-bisexual.

YET, 3 out of 5 people you find in Tumblr have at least one of these conditions(and 1 in those 3 have at least 2).

…Either someone is lying, or Tumblr really is a place for weird people.