autism disorder

anonymous asked:

I wish my autism spectrum disorder would be a thing I could be happy about having

I am actually watching a little boy who is on the spectrum as we speak, and he is the happiest child in the world … especially when he’s driving me nuts lol! I’m always envious of him for that carefree attitude. Obviously, I know this is not the same for everyone on the spectrum, but I’m only saying it because this little boy has no idea that people “feel sorry” for him, nor does he care. Yes, things are difficult for him to navigate at times, but he’s also incredibly smart and he impresses me every day with how quickly he learns. Autism is not a dirty word, and it is nothing to be ashamed about. You probably have abilities and senses that others could only ever wish for. I know how hard you have to work sometimes and I know that’s really stressful, but you are an amazing person with so much potential. You may have Autism, but it’s not all that you are. Be happy that you’re you. I’m proud of you!

______________________________________

⛥🔮What’s Your One Wish?🔮⛥

You are not “unnatural” or “bad” if you 

  • Have low to no empathy
  • Have hyper-empathy 
  • Have a personality disorder
  • Have more than one person in your mind
  • Have scary/violent thoughts
  • Don’t have the energy for interaction every day
  • Can’t take a shower/brush your teeth very often
  • Don’t like certain noises/textures
  • Don’t want to forgive them
  • Know you did nothing wrong
  • Love yourself 

Literally please please don’t interrupt people who have speech impediments to correct or rush them.

That includes not interrupting:

• Stuttering

• Really slow speech / lots of pauses or ums

• People who have difficulty being concise because thats really common for autism/adhd/other nd brains

• People with lisps/slurred speech due to a natural impediment

• People who repeat themselves without meaning to (another nd brain thing)

We KNOW that our speech isn’t typical, and a lot of us (though not speaking (yes that was a pun) for all of us) are pretty sensitive about it.

By interrupting you disrupt our train of thought, and in some cases we will literally forget everything about what we were going to say.

Also noah fence but if you interrupt to mock, laugh at, or get angry at us for our speech I hope you have a bad day and step on a lego.

Auditory Processing Problems

• *someone says something* “what?” *repeats themselves* “sorry?” *repeats themselves again* “pardon?”

•"hey, y'see the red thing at the top of the shelf, will you get it?“ "Sorry, what?” “On the sh-” “oh yeah sure, I’ll get it.”

•*doesn’t hear teacher because someone’s pen is making a scratchy sound at the back of the room*

•*replays video 10 ten times to figure out what they’re saying*

•teachers asking, “why do you always stop writing in the middle of a sentence, just write down whatever I’m saying,” followed by the response, “I’m just processing it,” rebuked by, “we’ll stop processing it and just write.”

•*gets really focused on staring out the window and goes through four songs without hearing a single on*

Autistic Lifehack: Hearing Problems

If someone says something that you only partially understand:

DON’T ask for clarification with a generic “What?” or “I’m sorry?” (In my experience, people will repeat the phrase the exact same way without helping you to understand).

Example:
Them: “Hey, do you like pahganabasa?”
Autistic Person: “What?”
Them: “Do you like pahganabasa?”
Autistic Person: “I’m sorry, what?”
Them (annoyed): “Do you like pahganabasa?”

Instead, DO repeat the part that you did understand, and substitute a “What?” for the unintelligable part.

Example:
Them: “Hey, do you like pahganabasa?”
Autistic Person: “Do I like what?”
Them: “Pineapple pizza?”
Autistic Person: (Understands the words!)

9

@actuallyadhd

[Image Descriptions:

All slides have a light blue background, and the text is written in blue rectangles with rounded corners.

Slide 1: The title is in white text inside a dark blue circle that is centred in the slide.

Sensory Overload And how to cope

Slide 2: The header is in a dark blue rectangle and white text, and the body is in a pale blue rectangle and black text.

Sensory overload has been found to be associated with disorders such as:

  • Fibromyalgia (FM)
  • Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS)
  • Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
  • Autistic spectrum disorders
  • Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD)
  • Synesthesia

Slide 3: The text is in three pale blue rectangles that go horizontally across the slide. All use black text. The last rectangle has four smaller dark blue rectangles with white text inside it for the four points. The text is centred in all of the rectangles.

Sensory overload occurs when one (or more) of the body’s senses experiences over-stimulation from the environment.

Basically it feels like everything is happening at once, and is happening too fast for you to keep up with.

Sensory overload can result from the overstimulation of any of the senses.

Hearing: Loud noise or sound from multiple sources, such as several people talking at once.

Sight: Bright lights, strobe lights, or environments with lots of movement such as crowds or frequent scene changes on TV.

Smell and Taste: Strong aromas or spicy foods.

Touch: Tactile sensations such as being touched by another person or the feel of cloth on skin.

Slide 4: A heading in two light blue rectangles with black text, followed by a table with a dark blue first row that has white text, and then alternating pale blue and white rows with black text. (The table is not really a table, it is just a four-column list.)

Obviously, everyone reacts in differently to sensory overload.

Some behavioural examples are:

Irritability — “Shutting down” — Covers eyes around bright lights — Difficulty concentrating
Angry outbursts — Refuses to interact and participate — Covers ears to close out sounds or voices — Jumping from task to task without completing
Overexcitement — Low energy levels — Difficulty speaking — Compains about noises not effecting others
High energy levels — Sleepiness/fatigue — poor eye contact — Overly sensitive to sounds/lights/touch
Fidgeting and restlessness — Avoids touching/being touched — Muscle tension — Difficulty with social interactions

Slide 5: The header is in a dark blue box with pointy corners and white text. The body is in a pale blue box with pointy corners and black text.

There are two different methods to prevent sensory overload: avoidance and setting limits:

  • Create a more quiet and orderly environment - keeping the noise to a minimum and reducing the sense of clutter.
  • Rest before big events.
  • Focus your attention and energy on one thing at a time.
  • Restrict time spent on various activities.
  • Select settings to avoid crowds and noise.
  • One may also limit interactions with specific people to help prevent sensory overload.

Slide 6: This looks the same as the last slide except the text in the header is black.

It is important in situations of sensory overload to calm oneself and return to a normal level.

  • Remove yourself from the situation.
  • Deep pressure against the skin combined with proprioceptive input that stimulates the receptors in the joints and ligaments often calms the nervous system.
  • Reducing sensory input such as eliminating distressing sounds and lowering the lights can help.
  • Calming, focusing music works for some.
  • Take an extended rest if a quick break doesn’t relieve the problem.

Slide 7: Four light blue rectangles with rounded corners, stacked one above the other, with black text.

What if someone you know is experiencing sensory overload?

Recognize the onset of overload. If they appear to have lost abilities that they usually have, such as forgetting how to speak, this is often a sign of severe overload.

Reduce the noise level. If they are in a noisy area, offer to guide them somewhere more quiet. Give time to process questions and respond, because overload tends to slow processing. If you can control the noise level, for example by turning off music, do so.

Do not touch or crowd them. Many people in SO are hypersensitive to touch - being touched or thinking they are about to be touched can worsen the overload. If they are seated or are a small child, get down to their level instead of looming above them.

Slide 8: Similar to previous slide, only with three rectangles instead of four.

Don’t talk more than necessary. Ask if you need to in order to help, but don’t try to say something reassuring or get them talking about something else. Speech is sensory input, and can worsen overload.

If they have a jacket, they may want to put it on and put the hood up. This helps to reduce stimulation, and many people find the weight of a jacket comforting. If their jacket is not within reach, ask them if they want you to bring it. A heavy blanket can also help in a similar way.

Don’t react to aggression. Don’t take it personally. It is rare for someone who is overloaded to cause serious harm, because they don’t want to hurt you, just get out of the situation. Aggression often occurs because you tried to touched/restrained/blocked their escape.

Slide 9: Similar to previous slide, only with two rectangles instead of three.

When they have calmed down, be aware that they will often be tired and more susceptible to overload for quite awhile afterwards. It can take hours or days to fully recover from an episode of sensory overload. If you can, try to reduce stress occurring later on as well.

If they start self-injuring, you should usually not try to stop them. Restraint is likely to make their overload worse. Only intervene if they are doing something that could cause serious injury, such as hard biting or banging their head. It’s a lot better to deal with self-injury indirectly by lowering overload.

Slide 10: The header is in a dark blue rectangle with white text, and the other text is in a row of five dark blue circles with white text. The text is centred in all shapes.

To summarise - Remember the 5 R’s

Recognise
The symptoms of overload

Remove
Yourself from the situation

Reduce
the stimulus causing the overload

Relax
Your body and calm yourself down

Rest
Yourself as you will most likely feel fatigue.]

Thankyou for everyone who participated in the Smashing Stigma Autism Survey 2017! These are our results, really interesting to see and we couldn’t do it without any of you :)

What the picture says:
Smashing Stigma - Autism Acceptance, Autism Survey 2017.
Autistic people: 94% prefer autistic person, 4% prefer person with autism and 2% prefer the option other.

We asked the same question to parents and supporters: 57% preferred autistic Person, 28% preferred person with autism and 15% preferred the option other.

Everyone together now: “No you think autism speaks is a good organisation for autism?” 95% responded No, 2% responded yes and 3% responded not sure.

(The picture is a poster with the smashing stigma logo, a multi coloured neurodivergent sign, the writing is in amongst 3 pie charts of the results)

Friendly reminder: This is what Trump thinks of Autistic people

“I’ll tell you what autism is. In 99 percent of the cases, it’s a brat who hasn’t been told to cut the act out. That’s what autism is. What do you mean they scream and they’re silent? They don’t have a father around to tell them, ‘Don’t act like a moron. You’ll get nowhere in life. Stop acting like a putz. Straighten up. Act like a man. Don’t sit there crying and screaming, idiot.” 

— Mike Savage, Trump’s appointment to head the NIH

In light of the Betsy DeVos confirmation,

Some tips for how to help:

  • Call schools and ask if you can pay off lunch balances.
  • Find reputable after-school programs that need volunteers or financial donations.
  • Donate school supplies! Even cheap notebooks and pencils can make a difference.
  • Love the kiddos in your lives. Tell them they matter. Listen to their stories; refuse to write them off as kids who just don’t know anything about the world and are just being dramatic/millennials who are always glued to their phones and so on.
  • When in doubt, call your local schools and ask what you can do. Every school has different needs, but they all need our help.

My heart breaks for my educator friends.
My heart breaks for parents of K-12 children.
My heart breaks for underprivileged, disabled, and otherwise marginalized children who will not be able to access an equitable education over the next few years (even more so than they already weren’t), who will be told in word and deed that their mere presence in the system is a burden.
My heart breaks.

  • me after slightly too much caffeine: Everything is clear to me the universe is infinite and yet i am more powerful than it! sensory issues who? i am the speed of light i can tackle God
  • me coming down off that caffeine: Bad. sensory overload from everything (even thoughts). Brain hurty

Ok I just finished Power Rangers (2017) and I don’t think Allistics quite understand how important it was to see Billy (the blue ranger) portrayed the way he was. 

In media, there’s generally only one kind of canon autistic. And by canon I mean “The source material uses terminology that references autism or outright states said character is autistic”, and Billy straight up said “I’m on the spectrum” which is how many of us say “I’m autistic” without actually saying it’s Autism Spectrum Disorder. He also said “No it’s a diagnosis” when he missed Jason’s (the red ranger) joke. 

So we only get one (1) kind of autistic in media. What kind is that? Well look no further than Sherlock “I’m a high functioning sociopath” Holmes of BBC’s Sherlock. That is usually what we get. A genuinely horribly written person who treats his peers like trash because he believes he’s smarter than them, and is given ~mystical Autism powers~ [read: he’s really good at logic and things] because of the fact that he is Autistic. 

We generally get the white boy who likes trains, is good at math, and treats people badly (if an adult) or is a “problem child” if a minor. 

Billy is a black autistic teenager. Now I’m white, I should say that straight up, but it is super important that we see black autistic characters. Why? Because people of color are massively under diagnosed with autism. The reasons for that vary, it could be resources (getting diagnosis is expensive), but a lot of it does have to do with racism in the field of psychology. It’s important for young black autistics to be able to see people like Billy on TV. To be able to think “That’s me. I could be a power ranger to.” 

Not once was Billy shown to be a “problem child” at all. He was a Soft Boy. He has special interests, trouble communicating and picking up on social cues. A few times there I thought he was going to cry from the stress of everything and when the bully at the start of the movie broke his pencils I felt what he did because I was in his situation once upon a time. He was distressed and if it wasn’t for Jason stepping in I have no doubt that the bully would have pushed him to tears. 

Billy was the reason everything took off. He found the coins. He was able to map out where the crystal was. He was the first to morph!!

He wasn’t this egotistical jackass who treats coworkers like they’re disposable silverware, he was a real person. He was a real autistic person. 

And seeing someone like him, being himself and was unapologetic about it! And when he did face shit for being autistic, both times the bully got fucked up. It even went the extra step of making the bully a running gag for getting hurt and tbh I don’t give a shit about a bully’s feelings I’m glad it was a running gag. 

Billy is so important, and I need people to understand we need more people like him in media at large. 

Just Special Interest™ things

-Waking up and having your first thought be about your special interest

-That feeling you get when you make your special interest both your icon and the backgrounds on your computer/phone

-Being unable to concentrate on work unless you incorperate your special interest to some extent

-Breaking through social anxiety only when the special interest is mentioned

-Constantly rambling about your special interest even when you know you’re annoying everyone

-Fearing talking about or drawing things related to the special interest because you don’t want people to think you’re obsessed

-Literally having your special interest on your mind 24/7

-Becoming frustrated when someone knows more about your special interest than you do

-Getting called obsessive or addicted by everyone

-”It’s just a phase!”

-Being made fun of for liking your special interest

-Hiding your special interest from your friends and family so they don’t make fun of you or judge you

-Having to hear allistic people refer to their hobby as their “special interest”

-Changing special interests as often as once a week, or as rarely as once a year, if ever

-Hating yourself during every second when your special interest becomes something embarrassing or bad, yet you can’t stop yourself from obsessing.

-Having more than one special interest so you try and mash them into one thing

Feel free to add more.