austrian academy of sciences

Letters on Wave Mechanics. Schrödinger Planck • Einstein • Lorentz, Edited by K. Przibram for the Austrian Academy of Sciences, Translated and with an Introduction by Martin J. Klein, Philosophical Library, New York, 1967

Stars align in test supporting 'spooky action at a distance'

Quantum entanglement may appear to be closer to science fiction than anything in our physical reality. But according to the laws of quantum mechanics – a branch of physics that describes the world at the scale of atoms and subatomic particles – quantum entanglement, which Einstein once skeptically viewed as “spooky action at a distance,” is, in fact, real.

Imagine two specks of dust at opposite ends of the universe, separated by several billion light years. Quantum theory predicts that, regardless of the vast distance separating them, these two particles can be entangled. That is, any measurement made on one will instantaneously convey information about the outcome of a future measurement on its partner. In that case, the outcomes of measurements on each member of the pair can become highly correlated.

Keep reading