australian and new zealand army corps (anzac)

A young boy looks on as war veterans make their way down Elizabeth Street during the ANZAC Day parade on April 25, 2017 in Sydney, Australia. Australians commemorating 102 years since the Australian and New Zealand Army Corp (ANZAC) landed on the shores of Gallipoli on April 25, 1915, during World War 1. Anzac day is a national holiday in Australia, marked by a dawn service held during the time of the original Gallipoli landing and commemorated with ceremonies and parades throughout the day. (Brendon Thorne/Getty Images)

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning,
We will remember them. 

Lest we forget!

(The artwork is called ‘The Catch Up’ by Warrick Eady. It covers 100 years of Australian army soldier uniforms, and is a tear-jerker for many folks from my side of the world. ANZAC day is about Australia and New Zealand and the tragedy the brave men and women bravely endured, but this really is a great image to show respect to all our fallen brothers in arms.)

Lest We Forget

“They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning
We will remember them.” - For the Fallen, by Laurence Binyon

Today, the 25th of April, is ANZAC day, the day that the ANZAC troops (Australian New Zealand Army Corps) landed in what is now called ANZAC cove in Gallipoli. It is a day of remembrance and mourning and a day of giving thanks to the brave men and women who fought and died for their country’s safety. We honor past and present soldiers for their sacrifice and courage. I wear the red poppy with pride, on this day of remembering, as a proud New Zealander, proud of her country and ancestors.

Thank you.

Lest we forget.


Originally posted by wildrider

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ANZAC Day is the solemn day of remembrance of those Australian and New Zealand Army Corps soldiers who fought and died at Gallipoli in 1915. It is also a day of remembrance for all servicemen and women who died while fighting for their country and the world to preserve the freedoms that we enjoy.

They shall not grow old, as we that are left grow old:
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning,
We will remember them.
Lest we forget…

I will remember… I will always remember my Allied brothers and sisters! Thank you!  OTFW

ANZAC Day

“They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning
We will remember them.”

Today, the 25th of April, is ANZAC day, the day that the ANZAC troops (Australian New Zealand Army Corps) landed in what is now called ANZAC cove in Gallipoli. It is a day of remembrance and mourning and a day of giving thanks to the brave men and women who fought and died for their country’s safety. We honor past and present soldiers for their sacrifice and courage.

Lest we forget.

Originally posted by wildrider

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April 25th 1915: Gallipoli campaign begins

On this day in 1915, during World War One, the doomed Gallipoli campaign began on the Gallipoli peninsula in the Ottoman Empire. The plan was the brainchild of British Lord of the Admiralty Winston Churchill, who intended to weaken the Ottoman war effort by opening another front in the Dardanelles, forcing Germany to split their army and send troops to aid their Turkish allies. Churchill’s proposal was risky, underestimating the ability of the Turkish army, and was hastily pushed through the War Office. The initial naval attack in the Dardanelles in February had some success, but British and ANZAC (Australian and New Zealand Army Corps) troops were soon called in to push inland and capture Constantinople. The landings began on April 25th, with Allied troops deployed at separate beaches. One of the most famous landings were the ANZAC forces at Anzac Cove, where they faced fierce resistance from the Turks. The British fared little better at Cape Helles, and by May, 20,000 of the 70,000 men deployed suffered causalities. The campaign continued for months, with Allied soldiers living under Turkish fire and shelling, and suffering poor conditions in the trenches. Eventually, fierce critics of the operation began to speak out, and in December and January the Allied forces were evacuated from Gallipoli. The campaign was a disaster for the Allies, who lost around 45,000 men, and failed to make any strategic gains. While the Turkish successfully and bravely defended their country, it proved a Pyrrhic victory as they lost 86,000 soldiers in the campaign. This day is commemorated in Australia and New Zealand as Anzac Day, in honour of the over 10,000 soldiers who died during the Gallipoli campaign representing their countries as independent nations.

“Those heroes that shed their blood and lost their lives…you are now lying in the soil of a friendly country. Therefore rest in peace. There is no difference between the Johnnies and the Mehmets to us where they lie side by side here in this country of ours.”
- Turkish leader Mustafa Kemal Atatürk, who fought at Gallipoli, on the ANZAC dead in 1934

100 years ago

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Gallipoli

The Gallipoli Campaign took place on the Gallipoli peninsula in Turkey, from 25 April 1915 to 9 January 1916, during the First World War.

By 1915 the Western Front was clearly deadlocked. Allied strategy was under scrutiny, with strong arguments mounted for an offensive through the Balkans or even a landing on Germany’s Baltic coast, instead of more costly attacks in France and Belgium.These ideas were initially sidelined, but in early 1915 the Russians found themselves threatened by the Turks in the Caucasus and appealed for some relief. 

The British decided to mount a naval expedition to bombard and take the Gallipoli Peninsula on the western shore of the Dardanelles, with Constantinople as its objective. By capturing Constantinople, the British hoped to link up with the Russians, knock Turkey out of the war and possibly persuade the Balkan states to join the Allies.The naval attack began on 19 February. Bad weather caused delays and the attack was abandoned after three battleships had been sunk and three others damaged. Military assistance was required, but by the time troops began to land on 25 April, the Turks had had ample time to prepare adequate fortifications and the defending armies were now six times larger than when the campaign began.

Against determined opposition, Australian and New Zealand troops won a bridgehead at ‘Anzac Cove’ on the Aegean side of the peninsula. The British, meanwhile, tried to land at five points around Cape Helles, but established footholds in only three before asking for reinforcements. Thereafter little progress was made, and the Turks took advantage of the British halt to bring as many troops as possible onto the peninsula.

Amid sweltering and disease-ridden conditions, the deadlock dragged on into the summer.  Churchill who championed the Gallipoli Campaign eventually lost his rather pretentious but oh so British title of “First Lord of the Admiralty” due to the failure of Gallipoli. Combinations of bad leadership, planning and luck, combined with a shortage of shells and inadequate equipment, condemned the Allies to seek a conclusion in the bloody battles of the Western Front. 

For the Australian and New Zealand Army Corp (ANZAC), it was their first time fighting for their own countries, in their own Army, and in their own uniforms. They fought under the “leadership” of the British Empire but experienced a comradeship in battle and bloodshed that solidified their identify as separate Nations. Australia had only achieved self governance via Federalization in 1901.  

(I promise this is the second last post I will do on ANZACs, other than a few pictures here and there. I can’t help it, I am an Aussie.)

What a pleasure it was to march in the ANZAC parade with my gorgeous horse while wearing my great grandfather’s medals to commemorate 101 years of the ANZACs.

Those medals I’m proudly wearing? They were earned by my great grandfather, German-born L.A.C. Arnold Klaehn (R.A.A.F). He served through the entire duration of WWII (1939-1945) and returned home. His father before him, my great great grandfather, was a mounted infantryman and I can distinctly remember seeing a photo of him and his horse as a child. It means so much to me as I come from a “non-horsey” family and I have been told by my grandfather that we are certainly kindred spirits, it just makes me feel closer to my ancestors.

For my friends overseas, the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps or ANZACs is a proud name given to allied Aussie and Kiwi soldiers who served and died in all wars, conflicts and peacekeeping operations. The ANZACs were truly a breed of their own. They all possessed and shared the same qualities; endurance, courage, good humour, larrikanism and above all mateship…. and I for one, cannot help but feel nothing but love for my Kiwi mates :)

Jack Robinson and WWI

So, I’ve always had something of an interest in military history, and I decided for my Rosie fic I needed to get an idea of what Jack’s experience of the Great War would be. For the record, I am not a historian, didn’t really study this period in school, and I’m not Australian, so anyone better qualified, feel free to blow my conclusions out of the water. This is all based on nothing more than extensive Wikipedia reading and a few Australian social history sites.

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