august 1990

anonymous asked:

I've seen a few people say that Katie Hall was 16 when cast. But does this mean that she first went on as the triangle girl and mirror bride at 16 or 17?

As Christine? Hmmmm.

Katie Hall was born in August 1990, and if my lists are correct she joined the West End production as u/s Christine in June 2008, replacing Sofia Escobar. She was 17 at this point, and probably 18 when she first went on as Christine. Still extremely young, by any means! And also impressive that she became the alternate at 21 and principal in the tour at 22. She did more in her early 20s than I’ve achieved as an adult, goddamnit. Kudos to her.

KUWAIT. Burgan burning oil fields. 1991. U.S. Marines. The invasion of Kuwait by Iraq took place on August 2nd 1990. It was followed by the Allied intervention under operation Desert Storm. The Allies finally liberated Kuwait on February 27th 1991, after 7 months of occupation and 5 weeks of war.

Photograph: Bruno Barbey/Magnum Photos

Pearl Bailey (March 29, 1918 – August 17, 1990)

View of singer and actress Pearl Bailey in a scene from the musical “Hello, Dolly!” Bailey sits on trolley holding a newspaper. Stamped on back: “Direct from Broadway, David Merrick presents America’s greatest musical. Pearl Bailey in Hello, Dolly! Co-starring Cab Calloway. Directed and choreographed by Gower Champion.”

  • Courtesy of the E. Azalia Hackley Collection of African Americans in the Performing Arts, Detroit Public Library

lesbiain-deactivated20170309  asked:

marsha p johnson wasn't a transwoman, he was a gender non conforming gay man/drag queen, he even said (shortly before his death no less) 'i am a man' like you don't have to strip gay men (especially dead ones, which is incredibly insensitive) of their identities to make a point :/

Miss thing I know the tumblr feminists you hang around with get hyped up on kilos of sherm and bathsalts before they type into this putrid site and whatnot but I am not the one. Marsha was a pre-op transsexual and she wanted to transition, but due to poverty, the criminalization of prostitution, her deteriorating mental health, antiblackness, homophobia, and transmisogyny, she could not. Trans identity politics did not exist in the united states when she was alive as they exist today (because things evolve) and she described her transition in ways that would be considered controversial on tumblr dot com but they ought to be acknowledged. Interesting enough, tumblr feminists like your ilk and some trans activists here both have that refusal to acknowledge complex history in common. You people always want to deny parts of her existence to fit your compartmentalized narratives. Trust me you’re not much better or different than your imagined enemies so jot that down.

Moving on, Marsha was a transsexual woman and she described her biological sex as being male (a trans person describing themselves in this way wasn’t considered as much of a controversial act back then as it is now). She called herself a woman and a man (referring to how she described her sex or lack of access to HORMONES AND SURGERY), and it is clear that her existence was one rife with transmisogynoir and hostility due to her engagement in prostitution so she could have money to support herself and to fund her transition, which, sadly, didn’t happen because of, in part, the very same sentiments expressed in this dumb ass message u sent me girl. She experienced violence in the same patterns as any other transsexual woman in prostitution. Read Viviane Namaste to learn more about how transsexual women specifically are most at risk for violence that results in death when they engage in prostitution.

From Rapping with a Street Transvestite Revolutionary, an interview originally done by Bob Kohler on August 20, 1990, reprinted in Out of the Closets: Voices of Gay Liberation. Can be read in full here for free.

Kohler: When you hustle on 42nd Street, do they know you’re a transvestite, or do they think you’re a woman? Or does it depend? 

Marsha: Some of them do and some of them don’t, because I tell them. I say, “It’s just like a grocery store; you either shop or you don’t shop.” Lots of times they tell me, “You’re not a woman!” I say, “I don’t know what I am if I’m not a woman.” They say, “Well, you’re not a woman.” They say “Let me see your cunt.” I say, “Honey, let me tell you something.” I say “You can either take it or leave it,” because, see, when I go out to hustle I don’t particularly care whether I get a date or not. If they take me, they got to take me as I want ‘em to take me. And if they want to go up my dress, I just charge them a little extra, and the price just goes up and up and up and up. And I always get all of my money in advance, that’s what a smart transvestite does. I don’t ever let them tell me, “I’ll pay you after the job is done.” I say I want it in advance. Because no woman gets paid after their job is done. If you’re smart, you get the money first.

Kohler: What about the term “drag queen?” People in STAR prefer to use the term “transvestite.” Can you explain the difference? 

Marsha: A drag queen is one that usually goes to a ball, and that’s the only time she gets dressed up. Transvestites live in drag. A transsexual spends most of her life in drag. I never come out of drag to go anywhere. Everywhere I go I get all dressed up. A transvestite is still like a boy, very manly looking, a feminine boy. You wear drag here and there. When you’re a transsexual, you have hormone treatments and you’re on your way to a sex change, and you never come out of female clothes.

Kohler: You’d be considered a pre-operative transsexual then? You don’t know when you’d be able to go through the sex change? 

Marsha: Oh, most likely this year. I’m planning to go to Sweden. I’m working very hard to go. 

Kohler: It’s cheaper there than it is at Johns Hopkins? 

Marsha: It’s $300 for a change, but you’ve got to stay there a year.

She wanted to transition. She planned to transition. She was a pre-op transsexual woman and a drag performer. Tryda disrespect a dead black woman in my inbox again girl and I implore you not to come for me if you glean all of your politics off your dashboard and sleazy wordpress blogs.

Celeb Women In The Signs

#internationalwomensday has passed, but there’s no reason it can’t be a woman-themed month, a woman-themed year, or a woman-themed life. In spirit, here are some cool celeb women born under each of our signs, plus I gave each sign a woman-positive quote I feel fits each of you zodiac sisters well. 

Aries: Selena (singer, born April 16, 1971), Maya Angelou (historical author, born April 4, 1928), Lady Gaga (singer, born March 28, 1986) 

“I’m tough, i’m ambitious, and I know exactly what I want. If that makes me a bitch, okay.” -Madonna

Taurus: Adele (singer, born May 5, 1988), Tina Fey (actress, born May 18, 1970), Grace Jones (caribbean star, born May 19, 1948), Nina Garcia (fashion journalist, born May 3, 1965)

“Women, if the soul of the nation is to be saved, I believe that you must become it’s soul.” -Coretta Scott King  

Gemini: Lauryn Hill (singer, born May 26, 1975), Heidi Klum (fashion designer, born June 1, 1973), Angelina Jolie (actress, born June 4,1975), Marilyn Monroe (actress, born June 1, 1926)

“Freedom, by definition, is people realizing that they are their own leaders”- Diane Nash

Cancer: Malala Yousafzai (nobel prize winner, born July 12, 1997), Frida Kahlo (painter, born July 6, 1907), Meryl Streep (actress, born June 22, 1949) (Wow! Lots of cool women are Cancers!!!)

“This is what my soul is telling me: Be peaceful and love everyone.” -Malala Yousafzai

Leo: Jennifer Lawrence (actress, born August 15, 1990), Jennifer Lopez (singer, born July 24, 1969), J.K. Rowling (author, born July 31, 1965), Halle Berry (actress, born August 14, 1966)

“No one can make you feel inferior without your consent.”-Eleanor Roosevelt 

Virgo: Mother Teresa (charity founder, born August 26, 1910), Amy Poehler (actress born September 16, 1971), Taraji P. Henson (born September 11, 1970), Beyonce (singer, born September 4, 1981)

“If you’re in a movement and not following a woman of color, you’re following the wrong movement”- Linda Sarsour

Libra: Serena Williams (tennis player, September 26, 1981), Gwen Stefani (singer, born October 3, 1969), Margaret Thatcher (only female prime minister of the UK, born October 13, 1925), Lilly Singh (youtube star, born September 26, 1988)

“Apparently it’s better to be a corporation today than to be a woman in front of the supreme court.” -Cecil Richards 

Scorpio: Kathy Griffin (comedian, born November 4, 1960), Allyson Felix (olympic track and field medalist, born November 18, 1985), Marie Curie (first woman to win a nobel prize, born November 7, 1867), Scarlett Johansson (actress, born November 22, 1984)

“The truth will set you free but first it will piss you off.”- Gloria Steinem

Sagittarius: Sojourner Truth (historian, born December 1, 1797), Shirley Chisholm (first black woman to run in politics, born November 30, 1924), Britney Spears (singer, born December 2, 1981), Cicely Tyson (actress, born December 18,1924)

“Don’t underestimate how much antagonism there is toward women and how many people wish we could turn the clock back.” -Nora Ephron

Capricorn: Aaliyah (singer, born January 16, 1979), Betty White (comedian, born January 17, 1922), Michelle Obama (former first lady, born January 17, 1964)

“Men: their rights, and nothing more. Women: their rights, and nothing less.”-Susan B. Anthony

Aquarius: Jennifer Aniston (actress, born February 11, 1969), Ellen DeGeneres (comedian, born January 16, 1956), Oprah Winfrey (host, born January 19, 1954), Rosa Parks (civil rights activist, born February 4, 1913)

“Words actually matter. They’re significant, they can transform and open up our imagination for others.”- Opal Tometi

Pisces: Rihanna (singer, born February 20, 1988), Eva Longoria (actress, born March 15, 1979), Queen Latifa (actress, born March 18, 1970), 

“Nothing is absolute. Everything changes, everything moves, everything evolves, everything flies and goes away.” -Frida Kahlo

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On this day in music history: June 6, 1989 - “In Step”, the fourth studio album by Stevie Ray Vaughan And Double Trouble is released. Produced by Double Trouble and Jim Gaines, it is recorded at Kiva Sudios in Memphis, TN, Sound Castle and Summa Studios in Los Angeles, CA from January 25 - March 13, 1989. The album is recorded shortly after Vaughan completes a successful stint in rehab regaining his sobriety after many years of alcohol and substance abuse. Fully focused and playing better than he had in years, Vaughan’s newly found sobriety, and the struggle to remain free of drugs and alcohol provides the inspiration for several of the albums’ songs including “Tightrope”, Wall Of Denial", and “Crossfire”. An artistic and commercial success upon its release, is his best selling album to date, also winning Vaughan a Grammy Award for Best Contemporary Blues Album in 1990. Sadly, it is the final album released by Stevie Ray Vaughan And Double Trouble before the guitarists death in August of 1990. In 1999, the album is reissued with four live bonus tracks and a short monologue by Vaughan talking about his struggles with substance abuse and becoming sober. It is also remastered and reissued as a hybrid SACD by Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab in 2011. The album is also reissued as a 200 gram vinyl LP by Analogue Productions in 2014. “In Step” peaks at number thirty three on the Billboard Top 200, and is certified 2x Platinum in the US by the RIAA.