august 1987

Hey Baby

For @dadharbour, @elevenknope, @stevemossington, and @eggo-my-leggo (and no, it’s not what you think)

August 1987

“Ta-da!” Steve said, jumping cautiously onto the fallen tree.  Jonathan looked at him, then at the creek, then back at him, mouth falling open.

“No.  No way.”

Steve’s shoulders dropped and he pouted.  His puppy dog eyes had nothing on Nancy’s but Jonathan looked away just in case.  There was no way he was changing his mind.  “Why not?”

Jonathan looked at him with wide eyes, gesturing to the tree.  “Because for starters, that tree is going to snap in half and we’re both going to fall into that creek, and I am not going to the hospital just because you want to reenact a scene from Dirty Dancing.”

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Stanley Kubrick’in Favori Filmleri

  • Annie Hall (Woody Allen, 1977)
  • Husbands and Wives (Woody Allen, 1992)
  • Manhattan (Woody Allen, 1979)
  • Radio Days (Woody Allen, 1987)
  • McCabe & Mrs. Miller (Robert Altman, 1971)
  • If… (Lindsay Anderson, 1968)
  • Boogie Nights (Paul Thomas Anderson, 1998)
  • La notte (Michelangelo Antonioni, 1961)
  • Harold and Maude (Hal Ashby, 1971)
  • Pelle the Conqueror (Bille August, 1987)
  • Babette’s Feast (Gabriel Axel, 1987)
  • Casque d’Or (Jacques Becker, 1952)
  • Édouard et Caroline (Jacques Becker, 1951)
  • Cries and Whispers (Ingmar Bergman, 1972)
  • Smiles of a Summer Night (Ingmar Bergman, 1955)
  • Wild Strawberries (Ingmar Bergman, 1972)
  • Deliverance (John Boorman, 1972)
  • Henry V (Kenneth Branagh, 1989)
  • Modern Romance (Albert Brooks, 1981)
  • Children of Paradise (Marcel Carné, 1945)
  • City Lights (Charles Chaplin, 1931)
  • The Bank Dick (Edward Cline, 1940)
  • Beauty and the Beast (Jean Cocteau, 1946)
  • Apocalypse Now (Francis Ford Coppola, 1979)
  • The Godfather (Francis Ford Coppola, 1972)
  • The Silence of the Lambs (Jonathan Demme, 1991)
  • Alexander Nevsky (Sergei Eisenstein, 1938)
  • The Spirit of the Beehive (Victor Erice, 1973)
  • La strada (Federico Fellini, 1954)
  • I vitelloni (Federico Fellini, 1953)
  • La Kermesse Héroïque (Jacques Feyder, 1935)
  • Tora! Tora! Tora! (Richard Fleischer, 1970)
  • The Fireman’s Ball (Miloš Forman, 1967)
  • One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (Milos Forman, 1975)
  • Cabaret (Bob Fosse, 1972)
  • The Exorcist (William Friedkin, 1973)
  • Get Carter (Mike Hodges, 1971)
  • The Terminal Man (Mike Hodges, 1974)
  • The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (Tobe Hooper, 1974)
  • Hell’s Angels (Howard Hughes, 1930)
  • The Treasure of Sierra Madre (John Huston, 1947)
  • Dekalog (Krzysztof Kieslowski, 1990)
  • Rashomon (Akira Kurosawa, 1950)
  • Seven Samurai (Akira Kurosawa, 1954)
  • Throne of Blood (Akira Kurosawa, 1957)
  • Metropolis (Fritz Lang, 1927)
  • An American Werewolf in London (John Landis, 1981)
  • Abigail’s Party (Mike Leigh, 1977)
  • La bonne année (Claude Lelouch, 1973)
  • Once Upon a Time in the West (Sergio Leone, 1968)
  • Very Nice, Very Nice (Arthur Lipsett, 1961)
  • American Graffiti (George Lucas, 1973)
  • Dog Day Afternoon (Sidney Lumet, 1975)
  • Eraserhead (David Lynch, 1976)
  • House of Games (David Mamet, 1987)
  • The Red Squirrel (Julio Medem, 1993)
  • Bob le flambeur (Jean-Pierre Melville, 1956)
  • Closely Watched Trains (Jiří Menzel, 1966)
  • Pacific 231 (Jean Mitry, 1949)
  • Roger & Me (Michael Moore, 1989)
  • Henry V (Laurence Olivier, 1944)
  • The Earrings of Madame de… (Max Ophuls, 1953)
  • Le plaisir (Max Ophuls, 1951)
  • La ronde (Max Ophuls, 1950)
  • Rosemary’s Baby (Roman Polanski, 1968)
  • The Battle of Algiers (Gillo Pontecorvo, 1966)
  • Heimat (Edgar Reitz, 1984)
  • Blood Wedding (Carlos Saura, 1981)
  • Cría Cuervos (Carlos Saura, 1975)
  • Peppermint Frappé (Carlos Saura, 1967)
  • Alien (Ridley Scott, 1977)
  • The Anderson Platoon (Pierre Schoendoerffer, 1967)
  • White Men Can’t Jump (Ron Shelton, 1992)
  • Miss Julie (Alf Sjöberg, 1951)
  • The Phantom Carriage (Victor Sjöström, 1921)
  • The Vanishing (George Sluizer, 1988)
  • Close Encounters of the Third Kind (Steven Spielberg, 1977)
  • E.T. the Extra-terrestrial (Steven Spielberg, 1982)
  • Mary Poppins (Robert Stevenson, 1964)
  • Platoon (Oliver Stone, 1986)
  • Pulp Fiction (Quentin Tarantino, 1994)
  • The Sacrifice (Andrei Tarkovsky, 1986)
  • Solaris (Andrei Tarkovsky, 1972)
  • The Emigrants (Jan Troell, 1970)
  • The Blue Angel (Josef von Sternberg, 1930)
  • Danton (Andrzej Wajda, 1984)
  • Girl Friends (Claudia Weill, 1978)
  • The Cars that Ate Paris (Peter Weir, 1974)
  • Picnic at Hanging Rock (Peter Weir, 1975)
  • Citizen Kane (Orson Welles, 1941)
  • Roxie Hart (William Wellman, 1942)
  • Ådalen 31 (Bo Widerberg, 1969)
  • The Siege of Manchester (Herbert Wise, 1965)
8

AFGHANISTAN. Kunar Province. August 1985 & October 1987. Mujahideen in Shultan valley on the Pakistan border, around 3,200 metres above sea level. The snow-covered Shigal mountains can sometimes be spotted. The third picture shows Commander Ajab Khan (Yunus Khalis group) with some of his men. Some kids also play with a “Zikuyak” Soviet-designed 14.5-mm anti-aircraft gun.

Photographs: Erwin Franzen via Flickr

Scan - Ringo Starr, George Harrison and Paul McCartney backstage at Candlestick Park, San Francisco, CA, 29 August 1966. Photo © Jim Marshall. Scanned from Tomorrow Never Knows: The Beatles’ Last Concert (and previously posted at thateventuality here).

“There was a certain amount of relief after that Candlestick Park concert. Before one of the last numbers, we set up this camera - I think it had a fisheye, a very wide-angle lens. We set it on an amplifier, and Ringo came out of the drums, and we stood with our back to the audience and posed for a photograph, because we knew that was the last show.” - George Harrison, Rolling Stone, 5 November 1987

youtube

On this day in music history: March 12, 1988 - “Never Gonna Give You Up” by Rick Astley hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for 2 weeks, also topping the Adult Contemporary chart for 3 weeks on the same date, and topping the Club Play chart for 1 week on January 16, 1988. Written and produced by Mike Stock, Matt Aitken and Pete Waterman, it is the debut single and the first US chart topper for the British pop singer from Newton-le-Willows, Lancashire, UK. Initially working at producers Stock, Aitken and Waterman’s PWL Studios in London as an assistant engineer/“tea boy”, Waterman hears Astley sing and then offer him a chance to record himself. “Never Gonna Give You Up” is recorded on January 1, 1987 at PWL Studios in London. Released in the UK in early August of 1987, it is an instant smash. It tops the UK singles chart for five weeks, and becomes the biggest selling single of the year. His debut album “Whenever You Need Somebody” also debuts at number one and spins off five singles throughout the year. Off the back of its international success, the record is picked up for release in the US by RCA Records in late 1987. Much like when making his UK debut, US audiences initially assume that Astley is black, until the music video for the single begins airing. People are taken aback when they discover that deep, rich, soulful voice is actually coming from a thin white Englishman under six feet tall. Physical appearance aside, the song quickly becomes a big hit in dance clubs and quickly begins receiving radio play. Entering the Hot 100 at #71 on December 19, 1987, it climbs to the top of the chart twelve weeks later. One of the most popular singles of the 80’s, “Never Gonna Give You Up” garners renewed interest and further notoriety on the internet in 2007 when it becomes the subject of a prank called “rickrolling”, involving misleading online links that redirect the person to the music video for “Give You Up”. “Never Gonna Give You Up” is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.

August 31st, 1987: 29 years ago MJ released his BAD album. The album produced five Billboard number one singles. Bad peaked at #1 in thirteen countries and charted within the top twenty in other territories. The album also won two Grammy Awards and it’s tour broke world records.

  • Record-setting gross of over $124 million made during the tour from September 1987 to December 1988. 
  • Most successful concert series, The tour sold out seven nights at Wembley Stadium, London, England.