august 1987

The last anyone heard of Jim Reyes was in August of 1987, with the scientist he worked with own notes making last mention of him on September 12, 1987. After this point, the scientist slipped from sanity, with the notes going maddening. When his lair was raided to find the origins of his new, monstrous shape originated from, what they discovered was something oddly terrifying and sympathetic. Inside were six or so other monsters, left for dead and displaying signs of weakness and wounds that were only now healing with the “Professor” gone. In their care and their defense came Oculapus, who was able to net the recovery team into a corner at first, until the research duos came running out, calling out to it with Reyes’s name. What they had uncovered was that either the body or the memories of Reyes had been used to create Oculapus, and that his more compassionate nature had led him to take care of the other monsters. When telling him of what the “Professor” had done, Oculapus knew what to do.


I must say that Oculapus is honestly one of my favorites of the monsters I designed for the 30 Day Challenge. Like, I wasn’t sure at first, but the idea of a gigantic, tentacle eyeball with telepathic and energy based powers was something that latched onto my heart and refused to let go. I’m glad that he’s got an image to him, and the pure strangeness he has. Definitely one for the roster to keep.

The image was the second sketch I had comissioned from @c-g-ricks, and I cannot recommend them enough. Seriously, Connor keeps open lines of communication, shows concepts, and enjoies the challenges that come his way. Like, look how well he made Oculapus look. Just look at it. That’s all you need to know. Go commission him. Do it. You won’t regret it.

Hey Baby

For @dadharbour, @elevenknope, @stevemossington, and @eggo-my-leggo (and no, it’s not what you think)

August 1987

“Ta-da!” Steve said, jumping cautiously onto the fallen tree.  Jonathan looked at him, then at the creek, then back at him, mouth falling open.

“No.  No way.”

Steve’s shoulders dropped and he pouted.  His puppy dog eyes had nothing on Nancy’s but Jonathan looked away just in case.  There was no way he was changing his mind.  “Why not?”

Jonathan looked at him with wide eyes, gesturing to the tree.  “Because for starters, that tree is going to snap in half and we’re both going to fall into that creek, and I am not going to the hospital just because you want to reenact a scene from Dirty Dancing.”

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8

AFGHANISTAN. Kunar Province. August 1985 & October 1987. Mujahideen in Shultan valley on the Pakistan border, around 3,200 metres above sea level. The snow-covered Shigal mountains can sometimes be spotted. The third picture shows Commander Ajab Khan (Yunus Khalis group) with some of his men. Some kids also play with a “Zikuyak” Soviet-designed 14.5-mm anti-aircraft gun.

Photographs: Erwin Franzen via Flickr

August 31st, 1987: 29 years ago MJ released his BAD album. The album produced five Billboard number one singles. Bad peaked at #1 in thirteen countries and charted within the top twenty in other territories. The album also won two Grammy Awards and it’s tour broke world records.

  • Record-setting gross of over $124 million made during the tour from September 1987 to December 1988. 
  • Most successful concert series, The tour sold out seven nights at Wembley Stadium, London, England. 
Stanley Kubrick’in Favori Filmleri

  • Annie Hall (Woody Allen, 1977)
  • Husbands and Wives (Woody Allen, 1992)
  • Manhattan (Woody Allen, 1979)
  • Radio Days (Woody Allen, 1987)
  • McCabe & Mrs. Miller (Robert Altman, 1971)
  • If… (Lindsay Anderson, 1968)
  • Boogie Nights (Paul Thomas Anderson, 1998)
  • La notte (Michelangelo Antonioni, 1961)
  • Harold and Maude (Hal Ashby, 1971)
  • Pelle the Conqueror (Bille August, 1987)
  • Babette’s Feast (Gabriel Axel, 1987)
  • Casque d’Or (Jacques Becker, 1952)
  • Édouard et Caroline (Jacques Becker, 1951)
  • Cries and Whispers (Ingmar Bergman, 1972)
  • Smiles of a Summer Night (Ingmar Bergman, 1955)
  • Wild Strawberries (Ingmar Bergman, 1972)
  • Deliverance (John Boorman, 1972)
  • Henry V (Kenneth Branagh, 1989)
  • Modern Romance (Albert Brooks, 1981)
  • Children of Paradise (Marcel Carné, 1945)
  • City Lights (Charles Chaplin, 1931)
  • The Bank Dick (Edward Cline, 1940)
  • Beauty and the Beast (Jean Cocteau, 1946)
  • Apocalypse Now (Francis Ford Coppola, 1979)
  • The Godfather (Francis Ford Coppola, 1972)
  • The Silence of the Lambs (Jonathan Demme, 1991)
  • Alexander Nevsky (Sergei Eisenstein, 1938)
  • The Spirit of the Beehive (Victor Erice, 1973)
  • La strada (Federico Fellini, 1954)
  • I vitelloni (Federico Fellini, 1953)
  • La Kermesse Héroïque (Jacques Feyder, 1935)
  • Tora! Tora! Tora! (Richard Fleischer, 1970)
  • The Fireman’s Ball (Miloš Forman, 1967)
  • One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (Milos Forman, 1975)
  • Cabaret (Bob Fosse, 1972)
  • The Exorcist (William Friedkin, 1973)
  • Get Carter (Mike Hodges, 1971)
  • The Terminal Man (Mike Hodges, 1974)
  • The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (Tobe Hooper, 1974)
  • Hell’s Angels (Howard Hughes, 1930)
  • The Treasure of Sierra Madre (John Huston, 1947)
  • Dekalog (Krzysztof Kieslowski, 1990)
  • Rashomon (Akira Kurosawa, 1950)
  • Seven Samurai (Akira Kurosawa, 1954)
  • Throne of Blood (Akira Kurosawa, 1957)
  • Metropolis (Fritz Lang, 1927)
  • An American Werewolf in London (John Landis, 1981)
  • Abigail’s Party (Mike Leigh, 1977)
  • La bonne année (Claude Lelouch, 1973)
  • Once Upon a Time in the West (Sergio Leone, 1968)
  • Very Nice, Very Nice (Arthur Lipsett, 1961)
  • American Graffiti (George Lucas, 1973)
  • Dog Day Afternoon (Sidney Lumet, 1975)
  • Eraserhead (David Lynch, 1976)
  • House of Games (David Mamet, 1987)
  • The Red Squirrel (Julio Medem, 1993)
  • Bob le flambeur (Jean-Pierre Melville, 1956)
  • Closely Watched Trains (Jiří Menzel, 1966)
  • Pacific 231 (Jean Mitry, 1949)
  • Roger & Me (Michael Moore, 1989)
  • Henry V (Laurence Olivier, 1944)
  • The Earrings of Madame de… (Max Ophuls, 1953)
  • Le plaisir (Max Ophuls, 1951)
  • La ronde (Max Ophuls, 1950)
  • Rosemary’s Baby (Roman Polanski, 1968)
  • The Battle of Algiers (Gillo Pontecorvo, 1966)
  • Heimat (Edgar Reitz, 1984)
  • Blood Wedding (Carlos Saura, 1981)
  • Cría Cuervos (Carlos Saura, 1975)
  • Peppermint Frappé (Carlos Saura, 1967)
  • Alien (Ridley Scott, 1977)
  • The Anderson Platoon (Pierre Schoendoerffer, 1967)
  • White Men Can’t Jump (Ron Shelton, 1992)
  • Miss Julie (Alf Sjöberg, 1951)
  • The Phantom Carriage (Victor Sjöström, 1921)
  • The Vanishing (George Sluizer, 1988)
  • Close Encounters of the Third Kind (Steven Spielberg, 1977)
  • E.T. the Extra-terrestrial (Steven Spielberg, 1982)
  • Mary Poppins (Robert Stevenson, 1964)
  • Platoon (Oliver Stone, 1986)
  • Pulp Fiction (Quentin Tarantino, 1994)
  • The Sacrifice (Andrei Tarkovsky, 1986)
  • Solaris (Andrei Tarkovsky, 1972)
  • The Emigrants (Jan Troell, 1970)
  • The Blue Angel (Josef von Sternberg, 1930)
  • Danton (Andrzej Wajda, 1984)
  • Girl Friends (Claudia Weill, 1978)
  • The Cars that Ate Paris (Peter Weir, 1974)
  • Picnic at Hanging Rock (Peter Weir, 1975)
  • Citizen Kane (Orson Welles, 1941)
  • Roxie Hart (William Wellman, 1942)
  • Ådalen 31 (Bo Widerberg, 1969)
  • The Siege of Manchester (Herbert Wise, 1965)