audiovisual*

On trauma aftermaths that don't advance the plot

The way TV shows trauma can lead people to expect every reference to trauma to be a plot point. This can be isolating to people coping with the aftermaths of trauma. Sometimes people treat us as stories rather than as people. Sometimes, instead of listening to us, they put a lot of pressure on us to advance the plot they’re expecting.

On TV, triggers tend to be full audiovisual flashbacks that add something to the story. You see a vivid window into the character’s past, and something changes. On TV, trauma aftermaths are usually fascinating. Real life trauma aftermaths are sometimes interesting, but also tend to be very boring to live with.

On TV, triggers tend to create insight. In real life, they’re often boring intrusions interfering with the things you’d rather be thinking about. Sometimes knowing darn well where they come from doesn’t make them go away. Sometimes it’s more like: Seriously? This again?

On TV, when trauma is mentioned, it’s usually a dramatic plot point that happens in a moment. In real life, trauma aftermaths are a mundane day-to-day reality that people live with. They’re a fact of life — and not necessarily the most important one at all times. People who have experienced trauma do other things too. They’re important, but not the one and only defining characteristic of who someone is. And things that happened stay important even when you’re ok. Recovery is not a reset. Mentioning the past doesn’t necessarily mean you’re in crisis.

On TV, when a character mentions trauma, or gets triggered in front of someone, it’s usually a dramatic moment. It changes their life, or their relationship with another character, or explains their backstory, or something. In real life, being triggered isn’t always a story, and telling isn’t always a turning point. Sometimes it’s just mentioning something that happened to be relevant. Sometimes it’s just a mundane instance of something that happens from time to time.

Most people can’t have a dramatic transformative experience every time it turns out that their trauma matters. Transformative experiences and moments of revelation exist, but they’re not the end all and be all of trauma aftermaths. Life goes on, and other things matter too. And understanding what a reaction means and where it came from doesn’t always make it go away. Sometimes, it takes longer and has more to do with skill-building than introspection. Sometimes it doesn’t go away.

On a day to day level, it’s often better to be matter-of-fact about aftermaths. It can be exhausting when people see you as a story and expect you to advance the plot whenever they notice some effect of trauma. Pressure to perform narratives about healing doesn’t often help people to make their lives better. Effect support involves respecting someone as a complex human, including the boring parts.

The aftermath of trauma is a day-to-day reality. It affects a lot of things, large and small. It can be things like being too tired to focus well in class because nightmares kept waking you up every night this week. TV wants that to be a dramatic moment where the character faces their past and gets better. In real life, it’s often a day where you just do your best to try and learn algebra anyway. Because survivors do things besides be traumatized and think about trauma. Sometimes it’s not a story. Sometimes it’s just getting through another day as well as possible.

A lot of triggers are things like being unable to concentrate on anything interesting because some kinds of background noises make you feel too unsafe to pay attention to anything else. For the zillionth time.  Even though you know rationally that they’re not dangerous. Even though you know where they come from, and have processed it over and over. Even if you’ve made a lot of progress in dealing with them, even if they’re no longer bothersome all the time. For most people, recovery involves a lot more than insight. The backstory might be interesting, but being tired and unable to concentrate is boring.

Triggers can also mean having to leave an event and walk home by yourself while other people are having fun, because it turns out that it hurts too much to be around pies and cakes. Or having trouble finding anything interesting to read that isn’t intolerably triggering. Or having trouble interacting with new people because you’re too scared or there are too many minefields. Or being so hypervigilant that it’s hard to focus on anything. No matter how interesting the backstory is, feeling disconnected and missing out on things you wanted to enjoy is usually boring.

When others want to see your trauma as a story, their expectations sometimes expand to fill all available space. Sometimes they seem to want everything to be therapy, or want everything to be about trauma and recovery.

When others want every reference to trauma to be the opening to a transformative experience, it can be really hard to talk about accommodations. For instance, it gets hard to say things like:

  • “I’m really tired because of nightmares” or 
  • “I would love to go to that event, but I might need to leave because of the ways in which that kind of thing can be triggering” or 
  • “I’m glad I came, but I can’t handle this right now” or
  • “I’m freaking out now, but I’ll be ok in a few minutes” or 
  • “I need to step out — can you text me when they stop playing this movie?”

It can also be hard to mention relevant experiences. There are a lot of reasons to mention experiences other than wanting to process, eg:

  • “Actually, I have experience dealing with that agency”
  • “That’s not what happens when people go to the police, in my experience, what happens when you need to make a police report is…”
  • “Please keep in mind that this isn’t hypothetical for me, and may not be for others in the room as well.”

Or any number of other things.

When people are expecting a certain kind of story, they sometimes look past the actual person. And when everyone is looking past you in search of a story, it can be very hard to make connections.

It helps to realize that no matter what others think, your story belongs to you. You don’t have to play out other people’s narrative expectations. It’s ok if your story isn’t what others want it to be. It’s ok not to be interesting. It’s ok to have trauma reactions that don’t advance the plot. And there are people who understand that, and even more people who can learn to understand that.

It’s possible to live a good life in the aftermath of trauma. It’s possible to relearn how to be interested in things. It’s possible to build space you can function in, and to build up your ability to function in more spaces. It’s often possible to get over triggers. All of this can take a lot of time and work, and can be a slow process. It doesn’t always make for a good story, and it doesn’t always play out the way others would like it to. And, it’s your own personal private business. Other people’s concern or curiosity does not obligate you to share details.

Survivors and victims have the right to be boring. We have the right to deal with trauma aftermaths in a matter-of-fact way, without indulging other people’s desires for plot twists. We have the right to own our own stories, and to keep things private. We have the right to have things in our lives that are not therapy; we have the right to needed accommodations without detailing what happened and what recovery looks like. Neither traumatic experiences nor trauma aftermaths erase our humanity.

We are not stories, and we have no obligation to advance an expected plot. We are people, and we have the right to be treated as people. Our lives, and our stories, are our own.

kickstarter

The future of DJing, Virtual Reality, and Interactive Learning & Design. 

All in one. 

This is a new musical instrument. A simple invention that changed the game. All the games. 

A simple IMU in a polyhedric, injection molded housing. Motion detecting and bluetooth enabled. 

Holding this controller - OTO (which comes from the Japanese “oto-no-katchi”, which roughly translates to “the shape of sound”), you can see the sound waves your are making in color and shape on a computer screen. 

In a virtual reality setup, the way you move these controllers could feed into the endless possibilities virtual reality goggles present. 

This project is a revolution in the music world. It allows for a new way to learn how to DJ through visuals and motions, making mixing more accessible that traditional DJ booths allow. 

A digital musical tool that transcends resonation and vibration, jumping to data and waves that can be represented in any way - light, color, sound - or all three. 

Imagine a new kind of performance… Imagine a new experience of music… Imagine a new educational tool… Imagine a new kind of symphony…   


https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1094448195/oto-touch-the-shape-of-sound?ref=hero_thanks# 

Tipos de aprendizaje y los signos

Piscis: Aprendizaje implícito: El aprendizaje implícito hace referencia a un tipo de aprendizaje que se constituye en un aprendizaje generalmente no-intencional y donde el aprendiz no es consciente sobre qué se aprende. El resultado de este aprendizaje es la ejecución automática de una conducta motora. Lo cierto es que muchas de las cosas que aprendemos ocurren sin darnos cuenta, Por ejemplo, hablar o caminar. El aprendizaje implícito fue el primero en existir y fue clave para nuestra supervivencia. Siempre estamos aprendiendo sin darnos cuenta.

Capricornio: Aprendizaje explícito: El aprendizaje explícito se caracteriza porque el aprendiz tiene intención de aprender y es consciente de qué aprende. Por ejemplo, este tipo de aprendizaje nos permite adquirir información sobre personas, lugares y objetos. Es por eso que esta forma de aprender exige de atención sostenida y selectiva del área más evolucionada de nuestro cerebro, es decir, requiere la activación de los lóbulos prefrontales.

Virgo: Aprendizaje significativo: Este tipo de aprendizaje se caracteriza porque el individuo recoge la información, la selecciona, organiza y establece relaciones con el conocimiento que ya tenía previamente. En otras palabras, es cuando una persona relaciona la información nueva con la que ya posee.

Libra: Aprendizaje cooperativo: El aprendizaje cooperativo es un tipo de aprendizaje que permite que cada alumno aprenda pero no solo, sino junto a sus compañeros. Por tanto, suele llevarse a cabo en las aulas de muchos centros educativos, y los grupos de alumnos no suelen superar los cinco miembros. El profesor es quien forma los grupos y quien los guía, dirigiendo la actuación y distribuyendo roles y funciones.

Cáncer: Aprendizaje emocional: El aprendizaje emocional significa aprender a conocer y gestionar las emociones de manera más eficiente. Este aprendizaje aporta muchos beneficios a nivel mental y psicológico, pues influye positivamente en nuestro bienestar, mejora las relaciones interpersonales, favorece el desarrollo personal y nos empodera.

Sagitario: Aprendizaje experiencial: El aprendizaje experiencial es el aprendizaje que se produce fruto de la experiencia, como su propio nombre indica. Esta es una manera muy potente de aprender. De hecho, cuando hablamos de aprender los errores, nos estamos refiriendo al aprendizaje producido por la propia experiencia. Ahora bien, la experiencia puede tener diferentes consecuencias para cada individuo, pues no todo el mundo va a percibir los hechos de igual manera.

Géminis: Aprendizaje por descubrimiento: Este aprendizaje hace referencia al aprendizaje activo, en el que la persona en vez aprender los contenidos de forma pasiva, descubre, relaciona y reordena los conceptos para adaptarlos a su esquema cognitivo.

Escorpio:  Aprendizaje receptivo: Con este tipo de aprendizaje denominado aprendizaje receptivo la persona recibe el contenido que ha de internalizar. Es un tipo de aprendizaje impuesto, pasivo. En el aula ocurre cuando el alumno, sobre todo por la explicación del profesor, el material impreso o la información audiovisual, solamente necesita comprender el contenido para poder reproducirlo.

Leo: Aprendizaje latente: aprendizaje en el que se adquiere un nuevo comportamiento, pero no se demuestra hasta que se ofrece algún incentivo para manifestarlo.

Acuario: Aprendizaje innovador es aquel que puede soportar cambios, renovación, reestructuración y reformulación de problemas. Propone nuevos valores en vez de conservar los antiguos.

Tauro: Aprendizaje auditivo una persona auditiva es capaz de aprovechar al máximo los debates en grupo y la interacción social durante su aprendizaje. El debate es una parte básica del aprendizaje para un alumno auditivo. Las personas auditivas aprenden escuchando y se prestan atención al énfasis, a las pausas y al tono de la voz. Una persona auditiva disfruta del silencio.

Aries: Aprendizaje kinestésico las personas con sistemas de representación kinestésico perciben las cosas a través del cuerpo y de la experimentación. Son muy intuitivos y valoran especialmente el ambiente y la participación. Para pensar con claridad necesitan movimiento y actividad. No conceden importancia al orden de las cosas. Las personas kinestésicas se muestran relajadas al hablar, se mueven y gesticulan. Hablan despacio y saben cómo utilizar las pausas. Como público, son impacientes porque prefieren pasar a la acción.

-Luis.

3

Farewell Ikutaro Kakehashi, initiator of the MIDI standard.

Ikutaro Kakehashi (梯 郁太郎, born in Osaka February 7, 1930) was an engineer, an entrepreneur, and the founder of Ace Tone, Roland Corporation and ATV, Japanese manufacturers of electronic musical instruments. He is known for his role in the development of Ace Tone and Roland drum machines and the MIDI standard.

In 1964, he developed a hand-operating electronic drums, called the R1 Rhythm Ace. It was exhibited at Summer NAMM 1964, however not commercialized.

In 1967, he developed the preset rhythm-pattern generator using diode matrix circuit, a drum machine where a “plurality of inverting circuits and/or clipper circuits are connected to a counting circuit to synthesize the output signal of the counting circuit” and the “synthesized output signal becomes a desired rhythm.”

Ace Tone commercialized his preset rhythm machine, called the FR-1 Rhythm Ace, in 1967. It offered 16 preset patterns, and four buttons to manually play each instrument sound (cymbal, claves, cowbell and bass drum). The rhythm patterns could also be cascaded together by pushing multiple rhythm buttons simultaneously, and the possible combination of rhythm patterns were more than a hundred (on the later models of Rhythm Ace, the individual volumes of each instrument could be adjusted with the small knobs or faders). The FR-1 was adopted by the Hammond Organ Company for incorporation within their latest organ models. In the US, the units were also marketed under the Multivox brand by Peter Sorkin Music Company, and in the UK, marketed under the Bentley Rhythm Ace brand. The Bentley-branded Rhythm Ace inspired the 1997 Birmingham band Bentley Rhythm Ace when a model was found at a car boot sale. The unique artificial sounds characteristics of the FR-1 were similar to the later Roland rhythm machines, and featured on electropop music from the late 1970s onwards.

In the 1970s, he founded Roland and continued the development of drum machines, including the Roland CR-78 and the iconic Roland TR-808.
In June 1981, Kakehashi proposed the idea of standardization to Oberheim Electronics founder Tom Oberheim, who then talked it over with Sequential Circuits president Dave Smith. In October 1981, Kakehashi, Oberheim and Smith discussed the idea with representatives from Yamaha, Korg and Kawai.[3] The MIDI standard was unveiled by Kakehashi and Smith, who both later received Technical Grammy Awards in 2013 for their key roles in the development of MIDI.

In 1991, based upon his contribution to the development and popularization of electronic instruments, Kakehashi was awarded an honorary doctorate from Berklee College of Music, U.S.A. In 2000 he left his handprints on the Rock Walk Hall of Fame in Hollywood. In 2013 he received a Technical Grammy Award, shared with Dave Smith of Sequential Circuits, for the invention of MIDI. Kakehashi retired from Roland in 2013.

In 2014, Kakehashi founded the ATV Corporation. Together with Paulo Caius, former CEO of Roland Iberia, Founder and CEO of Roland Systems Group EMEA, Makoto Muroi, a prestigious research engineer for music and audiovisuals, also former President of the Roland Systems Group Japan, Mark Tsuruta, former CEO of Roland Audio Development USA and Glenn Dodson, previous CEO of Roland Australia, they’ve decided to start again with a dedicated and experienced team. ATV has been growing since; with a vast team of experienced engineers focused on providing the market with brilliant and exciting new products in both market fields.

In 2002 Kakehashi published his autobiography, titled I Believe In Music, and was also featured as a biography in the book The Art of Digital Music.

Highlights:
1930 - Born in Osaka, Japan.
1954 - Started Kakehashi Radio electrical appliance store
1960 - Founded Ace Electronic Industries Inc.
1967 - Patented “Automatic Rhythm Performance Device” drum machine
1972 - Founded Roland Corporation and became president
1983 - Unveiled MIDI standard
1988 - Roland purchased Rodgers Organ Company renamed Rodgers Instruments fulfilling Kakehashi’s lifelong dream to build large classical organs
1994 - Founded Roland Foundation and became chairman
1995 - Appointed chairman of Roland Corporation
2001 - Resigned chairman’s position and appointed Special Executive Adviser of Roland Corporation
2013 - Received technical Grammy (along with Dave Smith) for inventing MIDI
2013 - Retired from Roland Corporation
2014 - Founded ATV Corporation

vimeo

The sound of empty space

Finally

10

When you look up in a dictionary the phrase “HEAD OVER HEALS IN LOVE”, there should be an audiovisual record of Min Hyuk waltzing into his office like a ray of sunshine with a goofy, megawatt smile plastered on his face; so eager and excited to see BS the first thing in the morning, so loathe to step away from her and unable to even look away. HE EVEN BACKWALKS so he wouldn’t have to take his eyes off her! And all that because how happy he was to meet her last night.

It’s been mentioned many times before that it’s those little things and gestures that matter the most and reveal a lot about a person and their feelings and one of those things are Min Hyuk gifts to Bong Soon which don’t even feel like gifts at first because he always gives them to her so matter-of-factly and subtly. They are so thoughtful and considered as he always manages to give her the things that she needs and wants the most. 

  • When BS feels insecure about her English, MH buys her English textbooks and lets her study during her work time, 
  • when she is hungry or worried he buys her food,
  • when she wants to create a game, he gives her a computer with all the programs she will need 
  • and when she wants to fight the villains, HE CREATES A TRAINING REGIME ONLY FOR HER SO SHE CAN FACE THEM AND WIN. 

That’s only one of the many ways he keeps helping her and supporting her. He doesn’t asks for anything in return, his only selfishnes is that he wants for BS to do all those things with him. It’s enough to make him happy because her happiness is the source of his own.

youtube

@bjorkg 

Daniela Mars. Thanks for your music.

I don’t know the perfume of your land.

I just want to hear this sound.

humans_izsac