audio accompaniment



4.0 out of 5 stars
My failure’s complete


4.0 out of 5 stars
Finally got them to sleep, eh? Now try and get them to eat !
I was trying to figure out how Adam Mansbach was going to top his hilarious “Go the F**** to Sleep” picture book (sorta a parody of Goodnight Moon), and here it is.I was a stepdad to three kids for about 5 years, and getting them to sleep paled in comparison to getting them to eat right. The tween girl wanted to eat nothing but mashed potatoes, while the smallest boy was on a diet (not paleo!) of Ramen and cereal. The older boy just into his teens ate anything and everything, but keeping him fed was like feeding a coal fired boiler.So yeah, even tho I am no longer troubled by this, I found this book hilarious.Every parent with a “problem eater” (which is pretty much any parent) should read this book and thus realize you’re not alone and it could be worse.Owen Brozman here takes over the illustrators mantle, and does an excellent job.I await with much trepidation the next book. Dating? Go to Amazon

5.0 out of 5 stars
Instant Classic!
I feel like this guy lives with me. I have two kids. One won’t sleep, one won’t eat. This is another instant classic in our house. Go to Amazon

5.0 out of 5 stars
Very funny
Oh my goodness. Best. Book. Ever. I got the other one as well, and they are hilariously true. These would be a great gift for any new/old parents. 😂 Go to Amazon

5.0 out of 5 stars
A fun book that any parent can relate to…
This book is absolutely hilarious! It is not meant for children, but you can edit it as reading it so it can be a children’s book. The pictures are funny, the situations can be related to, and the book is overall really funny. This book should be read by all parents who have a picky eater. My son pulls the same stuff kids do in this book. The page where the kid refuses to eat pancakes because he suddenly hates them, when they used to be his favorite, and the parent told him he’s full of **** and to stop lying made me laugh. My son will love something one day, and then claim to hate it the next. This would be a great gift to anyone that has a toddler, or anyone who has a kid that can be a jerk about eating ;) Go to Amazon

4.0 out of 5 stars
Yup
This book hit a little close to home. I’d have given it the fifth star, but I’ve said almost every line from this book, at one point or another, so I know it wrote itself. Go to Amazon

4.0 out of 5 stars
Good Fun
If you are a fan of Adam Mansbach’s Go the F*** to sleep and its accompanying audio book narrated by Samuel L. Jackson, then you will probably love this book. Written and drawn in the style of a children’s book, You Have to F****** Eat addresses to age old battle fought between child and parent at meal time. Imagine Good Night Moon or Where the Wild Things Are if they were written by a foul-mouthed sailor. The language is raw, but the tone and “story” are pitch perfect.As I stated in my review of Go The F*** to Sleep, avoid this book if you are easily offended.I took a star off because this is Adam Mansbach’s second children’s book parody and I felt like it rehashed the original book’s formula without breaking much new comedic territory. Go to Amazon

5.0 out of 5 stars
Hilarious
I was in tears, I laughed so hard reading this book. I have two kids, both who have feeding issues. My eldest is in college and doesn’t have a feeding tube anymore and is greedy. My youngest still has a feeding tube. After some minor test, there was no reason for them not to eat. They just didn’t want to so they had to get feeding tubes. The title of the book alone had me cracking up. If only I could read it to them lol. I’m getting his other books. Go to Amazon
Neon Genesis Evangelion: 0.1 You must (not) run away. fan edit

This fan edit combines the first six episodes of Neon Genesis Evangelion into a roughly two-hour movie, in a format based loosely on the Rebuild of Evangelion films and in this case with a storyline that mirrors the first film. This is the first of four such edits I have planned, with future edits comprised of episodes 7-12, 13-18, and 19-24’ (using the director’s cuts of episodes 21-24).

DOWNLOAD LINK HERE

Notes on this edit:

  • This edit contains both the original Japanese audio (with accompanying removable subtitles) and English dubbed audio, and has chapter stops where the beginning and commercial break in each episode would be.
  • On-screen Japanese text is translated via on-screen titles, and the Japanese location/descriptive captions in episode 6 are replaced with English ones.
  • The video was taken from what I believe to be 1:1 MKV Blu-ray rips, re-encoded to MP4 for editing using Handbrake with the highest possible settings. These rips were also the source for the Japanese audio.
  • The English audio was taken from a bootleg Blu-ray set, which used the Platinum Edition 5.1 mixes of the dub. This set was also the source for the translation used in the subtitles, which I’m told is based on the 2D4U fansub with further revisions and corrections by a native Japanese speaker.

Screenshots:

Share, upload, distribute and bootleg freely.

read along with me!

回乡偶书 (一)
huí xiāng ǒu shū (yī)

少小离家老大回 ,
shào xiǎo lí jiā lǎo dà huí,
乡音无改鬓毛衰。
xiāng yī wú gǎi bìn máo cuī。
儿童相见不相识,
ér tóng xiāng jiàn bù xiāng shí,
笑问客从何处来。
xiào wèn kè cóng hé chù lái。

The Book of Going Back Home (part one)

I left home as a child and returned when old
My accent remains the same, but my hair is white
The children I meet don’t know me
They ask where I am from with a smile

The lines are pretty easy to understand for the most part, straightforward, but that second line though. Let’s break it down:
1. 乡音~accent; 无改~unchanged
(kinda obvious)

2.鬓~temples, hair on the temples;
毛~hair, fur; 衰~weaken

together: 鬓毛衰 hairs at the temples is ‘weakened.’ That is to say that the hair is showing signs of aging, turning white.

Additional notes:
•乡音 [xiāng yīn || lit: native sound] (accent )
*口音 [kǒu yīn || lit: mouth sound] is more commonly used.

•衰 [cuì] (decline, weaken) sounds a lot like, and reminds me of, 脆 [cuì], meaning weak or fragile. It might have been something that went into the choosing of the words ORrrrr…it could be just me.

•相识 [xiāng shí || lit: mutually knowing ~ish] (to get to know each other; make acquaintance)

shana-bobana-deactivated2017071  asked:

I see these posts of notes that are so pretty and organized. Do you have any tips on note taking?

image

Hey, there!

Sorry for the delayed response. I do have tips for note taking but I will just say that note taking is very much individual. What works for me may not work for you at all! I shall give you mine, nonetheless.

Okay, so, I take two different kinds of notes: revision notes and class notes. I will start with class notes and then go into revision notes.


Before taking notes:

  1. I suggest you purchase a set of coloured pens, black writing pens, a ruler, post-it-notes, margined and lined paper, a HB pencil and a decent quality A3 paper pad (over 100gsm).
  2. Here are the links to those items which I use myself and would recommend. Those in bold are the ones I recommend unreservedly:

     - Sharpie Fine Pens;
     - Stabilo Fineliner Pens
     - Post-it Notes: Bubbles;
     - Post-it Notes: Arrows;
     - Post-it Notes: Index Box (for annotating literature);
     - Index Stickers;
     - Stabilo Neon Highlighters;
     - Ryman Lined Refill Pad;
     - A3 Paper Pad (180gsm);
     - Xerox A4 Paper (100gsm);
     - Pentel Energel Ink Writing Pens;
     - Staedtler HB Pencils;
     - Helix Ruler.

Class Notes:

  1. My class notes are often very rough, not necessarily neat, and brief. However, I rectify them at some point a little later on. This is because we cover so much content in any one class and that makes neat note-taking somewhat impossible. I’d rather I paid attention than spent tonnes of time making cute, neat, notes in class time.
  2. You will get much more from the revision end of this answer because my college provides us with note packs on each lesson or rather, each topic. The only one of my subjects where this is not largely the case, is English Literature. However, for the others, we spend much more time listening and annotating than copying things down and writing our own notes. 

English Literature Class Notes:

Each of us has a clean copy of the texts studied and we spend much of our class time either planning essays, reading and annotating the copy of the text, or listening to our teacher’s explanations of various things and discussing said things with each other and the teacher. You get a lot of hand-outs for English because it’s more about taking in the vast amount of information you need for the exam and getting to know the texts as opposed to actually wasting time making pretty notes… if you catch my drift? 

Annotating the copy is where you can be colourful, neat and creative. I use index tabs and the post-it notes index box to make my annotations, using coloured pens and colour coding various literary techniques, writing general notes in black ink. For example: I may circle metaphors in a certain chapter, in one colour - say green - and will not, therefore, use green at all for anything else in the rest of that chapter. That way, your mind gets used to seeing these and helps the content to stick. Moreover, I use bubble/arrow post-it notes to summarise the chapter on the final page of each, making concise bullet-points pertaining to the key parts of the chapter. 

Here is an example taken from my copy of Fitzgerald’s, ‘The Great Gatsby’:

History Class Notes: 

In History, our teacher provides us with a note-pack each lesson. These consist of a comprehensive page or so of narrative-like notes on the titled topic. Then, there are power-point slides and note-lines for the next few pages and following this, is a glossary of terms, events, and a list of key names. Then finally, we have a few documents which are often very useful for putting things in context and for precise detail you can use as evidence in essays. 

Each class, we are dictated notes and we write these down in the lined note spaces on the powerpoint presentation pages. They look like this (for Vietnam - AQA HIS2Q):

Religious Studies: Philosophy and Ethics Class Notes:

We are given lesson packs for each topic, consisting of academic/narrative-like prose on the topic content. We then go through the topic, engaging in in-depth discussions about the content of the notes and then I go on to make my own, condensing the detail into need-to-know ‘stuff’. Here is an example of both the pack and my own work:


Revision Notes:

  1. My revision notes are made through multiple things. I ask for computerised copies of all note packs, editing them through the Preview software on Apple Mac’s; I make flash-cards; I write key information on A4 paper and blutac them to the wall; I write essays over and over again; I make mind-maps on A3 paper; I highlight my note-packs; I read my texts and note packs and use audio books to accompany my re-reads of the texts for English; I watch the movie versions of the books; I use The Student Room and Tumblr to bounce off of others; I use past papers.
  2. I don’t actually like writing vibrant revision notes, I find it distracting and blurring rather than helpful. I prefer the notes to be more black and whie with the odd bit of colour from Sharpie Pens. 

English Literature Revision Notes:

For English, essays are the best thing you can do aside from really getting to know the texts well, perhaps re-reading them. Even if the exam is open-book, you really should know the text as well as you should if the exam was closed-book. I also used mind-maps to help with English as I feel it’s information you need to keep refreshing and reviewing until it sticks as English is one of those subjects you have to grow with and develop as you go along.

Here’s an example of a rough mind-map/poster and an essay I got an A on:

History Revision Notes:

For History, I highlight key information I believe will be of use to me in an essay, specifying which kind in annotations made to each highlighted section. I then condense these into key information on flash cards. I also make some small mind-maps on flash cards for the more general information, like facts and figures, and put some key information on A4 sheets and blutac them to the wall in my bedroom. History was the subject I felt the most prepared for and worked months in advance and was lucky in doing so as A-Level History had an incredibly tough year this year. 

Also, it goes without saying that I wrote a lot of essays for history! So, here are photographs of each individual thing - flash cards, an essay, a poster, annotations in my textbook and my note packs:

Religious Studies: Philosophy and Ethics Revision Notes:

For RS, I annotate electronic copies of my notes, condense these down into flash cards, and make A4 mind-maps. I also, as you can guess, write essays and then get them marked. Take a look at these:


To Summarise:

My general advice is to experiment with what works for you; use note-taking as a means of revisiting information from class, focusing on listening in class rather than writing; and make very brief, rough notes in class. Understand the topic because if you don’t - your notes are useless anyway which is why I always say, spend class listening. Finally, keep your notes clear, concise, and organised. 

I hope this helps, 

~Jay’xo

anonymous asked:

phil probably just stumbled across this types of fics on tumblr. it was just a lil joke or do you think phil searches "gay iron man mpreg fic" on his free time? this is why ppl always tell you "it's not that deep"

nah dude!!!! youre so wrong!!! phil not only searches ‘gay iron man mpreg fic’ in his free time, he writes it!!! he has the ao3 tag set as his home page on every single one of his browsers across all of his web-enabled devices!!!!! he is an active member of the avengers fandom and runs a smut blog where he finds porn doubles/lookalikes and posts audio edits to accompany all of his mpreg fic!! in fact i also earnestly believe that the only reason he is still with dan is because there’s a faint resemblance there to tony stark if you, like, squint a little and tilt your head sideways and maybe also down three (3) shots of tequila!!!!! and bc dan is more than willing to roleplay captain america/tony stark in the bedroom! im so sorry you misunderstood my original posts and that i wasn’t clear enough!!!!!!!!!! i should’ve spelled out that there’s so much more to this than phil reading mpreg fic in his free time. it is highly likely that he was one of the original pioneers of the popularity of mpreg fic on the internet. he might call himself a youtube dinosaur but it’s astoundingly evident that he is simultaneously a fandom and slashfic-writing dinosaur as well, don’t get it twisted!!!!!!! and in case it wasn’t clear, this is in fact as deep as any discourse can ever get. perhaps the profoundest point i have made in my 22 years of life, in any capacity, ever. i’m so glad we’re all here to share in the overwhelming deepness of my viewpoints, but i do send you my sincerest apologies that all the depth clearly went over your head <3 i’ll do a better job communicating next time. no hard feelings, yeah? have a nice day!

12 Things We Learned from Jordan Peele's Get Out Commentary

There’s not much I can say about Get Out that hasn’t already been said. Jordan Peele’s auspicious directorial debut is not only one of the best films of the year, it’s one of the most important. In addition to delivering the thrills and chills of an effective horror movie, Peele addresses racial tensions head-on without coming off as sanctimonious. Furthermore, he proved that movies with black leads can be successful at the box office.

With such a unique perspective, I was eager to hear what the first-time filmmaker had to say in his audio commentary that accompanies Get Out’s home video release. He concludes the track by confessing that he debated remaining ambiguous about the meaning of certain aspects, a la Stanley Kubrick. Thankfully, he decided to “totally nerd out” and divulge every detail he could fit into 104 minutes.

Here are 12 things I learned from Jordan Peel’s Get Out commentary track. Spoilers follow, so don’t read on until after you’ve seen the movie.

Keep reading

[Book Review] - McGill Korean 1

You guys, I am very excited to be reviewing this book! I first started learning Korean about seven years ago as a first-year student at McGill University. I loved my Korean classes and was so happy to go to class every day, largely thanks to my awesome professor at the time, 김명희 교수님. Well, we still keep in touch, and today I am reviewing a textbook that she wrote and recently got published! So here are my disclaimers for this review: I received my copy of the book for free, as my professor asked the publisher to send me a copy, but I was in no way contacted by the publishing company to review this, and my professor did not ask me to review it either. Rather, I said that I would review the book and post about it here—before she even offered to send me a free copy; I was set to go out and buy it myself—because I like reviewing books and helping you guys find good study material! I will review this book as objectively as possible!

And now, let’s get into it!

Honestly, I love this book. I have a few little gripes about things here and there, but over all, I think this is a great beginner resource. The book is written for classroom usage, but it is structured and written in a way that is very friendly to self-studiers as well! It’s a thin book at just over 200 pages, but it packs in a large amount of information in that space. Also included are accompanying audio files for the book, which must be downloaded from the publisher’s website.

“McGill Korean 1″ starts with a short intro to Hangul that, blessedly, doesn’t use romanization—sort of. What it uses to represent the sounds of the characters is like a simplified version of IPA (International Phonetic Alphabet), and either way, it is only seen on those few first pages and never again in the entire book. That is, you must rely on the audio files to develop an ear for the sounds and use that to guide you. The Hangul intro chapter ends with a listen-and-repeat exercise with a fairly large list of words to get you used to hearing and producing the sounds, and then you’re on your own!

The structure of each chapter is generally: Dialogue, related grammar, dialogue 2, related grammar, exercises, and a vocab list. Some chapters even have three dialogue + related grammar sections. The dialogues read smoothly and have accompanying audio files, and the related grammar—there’s a lot of it—is explained clearly and concisely so that even self-studiers should be able to understand. As for the practice exercises, I was surprised by just how many there are! Especially toward the end of the book, as the grammar gets more complicated, you’ll find chapters with three or more pages of practice problems, ranging from listening exercises to fill-in-the-blank, sentence writing, and more. There is an answer key in the back of the book for when you’re done with the problems.

If I were to gripe about anything about this book, it would be that the large majority of the example sentences that accompany the grammar explanations do not have translations. All of them use grammar and vocab that has already appeared in the book and are fairly simple to understand, but I’m sure some people would like having that translation available to make sure that they’re interpreting the sentence correctly. Of course, in a classroom setting this isn’t a problem as one could simply ask the teacher. 

Overall, this book is an excellent beginner resource! With a large amount of useful grammar, clear grammar explanations, and a lot of practice exercises all laid out in a visually appealing package of bright colors and cute illustrations, “McGill Korean 1″ will get you to a solid high beginner level, enough to have simple daily life conversations with people around you.

Gurg abusing his dog Dobbs
Onision
Gurg abusing his dog Dobbs

I wasn’t kidding when I answered that anon the other day about having audio of him being an abusive and shaming fucking cunt to his poor dog.  Now we know why the animal pisses itself every time he walks into the room. Trigger warning if this sort of stuff upsets you.  These clips were from 2013 and unfortunately I don’t have the video to accompany this audio anymore.

anonymous asked:

Hi queens! So this is sorta random but I know in the past I think some of you were talking about learning Korean? And I just wanted to ask what y'all use to learn it? Sorry...I know y'all aren't Rosetta Stone representatives but...I was just curious!

Es no problem!  We use apps and follow studyblr’s on here that teach languages.  Like our roommate @fromirelandtokorea, she’s learning Korean as well and shares the information she learns because she’s a tiny Irish angel!  Then there is also @studyingkorean and @wakeupandkorean.

You should also check out How to Study Korean.  It’s a free site that teaches you how to study Korean just like it says.  It has over 100 lessons and it is a great resource Lily recommends.  They give you workbook lessons, vocabulary and they have a Youtube channel.

Lily also found Korean From Zero.  It offers pdf’s of the three books published for FREE as well as the audio accompaniment.  If you prefer a physical copy they provided a link so that you can buy the books as well.

Currently we use Memrise, it’s an ios and Android app, you can also work on the website.  It’s good for vocabulary and learning hangul characters, but it also offers other languages and subjects so its a pretty good deal if you go Pro.  

I, Winter, personally also use EggBun, which only offers Korean, Chinese and Japanese at the moment.  It’s an app that pretty much lets you chat with Lanny, the automated character to learn the language.  It’s good for learning to actually text, I use it to practice on the Hangul 10 key on my phone.

And then if you have the cash and time to wait for shipping, Talk To Me In Korean is bombdotcom!  It’s made by Native Korean speakers and it simplifies the language well.  

Also, just remember you aren’t going to pick the language up overnight and just do what comes easiest to you.  We all have different methods for learning here, like I prefer to make charts and flashcards and things of that nature. 

Hope this helps you on your language journey! HWAITNG!

Originally posted by fuckyeahkpopgifs

Sanic Moon
Sanic

So this one time I was watching the Stars season of, Sailor Moon, and I couldn’t help but notice that the victim/Monster of the Week’s voice sounded awfully familiar. Now just try to get the image of Sonic yelling “BEAUTIFUL”, while sparkly feathers fly past him, out of your head…

Concubine {M}

Originally posted by minghaon

Title: Concubine

Type: Excerpt from Painted White Sins

Rating: M+ (Camboy!Jun, roleplay, FAKE blood play)

Featuring: Wen Junhui

Summary: Roleplaying fantasy scenarios as part of his show, Junhui isn’t your normal camera idol; playing as a vampire to please his adoring fans. (Reposting on new blog only for written work)

Keep reading

6

( Hello friends! Toy Chica Mod and VA here! I’m still feeling a little under the weather, but I wanted to make a post for today anyway. I use these pictures to accompany my audio posts, and wanted to give you a better look at em! These are of me and my Toy Chica cosplay! I LOVE being Chica, and have improved her and had so much fun being her at conventions for a couple years. 

Thanks to @fnaffandomevents for Animatronic August, and hopefully Toy Chica will see you tomorrow. <3 )

Prince’s Epic ‘Purple Rain’ Tour: An Oral History


By David Browne, Rolling Stone, June 22, 2017


On July 27th, 1984, Prince and the Revolution were confronted with their first hint of how their lives were about to change when they attended the Hollywood premiere of Prince’s first movie, Purple Rain. “That night at Grauman’s Chinese Theatre was insane,” recalls keyboardist Lisa Coleman. “We thought we’re just making what would be kind of a cult film. I’d stood in line at that theater to see Alien the first day it came out. And now there I was, arriving in a limo. Limousine, red carpet – none of us had ever done anything like that before. We felt more like rebels, and suddenly we’re all fancy, like movie stars.”

That night would only be the start of one of the most momentous years in Prince’s life. The film was an immediate cultural touchstone, grossing $7.7 million in its opening weekend (a commanding figure at the time) and eventually grossing 10 times that amount. Four months later, at the Joe Louis Arena in Detroit, Prince and the Revolution launched the Purple Rain tour. The 98-show trek, which continued through April 1985, was groundbreaking in many ways: It introduced Prince’s most elaborate sets and a new guitarist (Wendy Melvoin), and the crowd hysteria and occasional cameos from the likes of Bruce Springsteen and Madonna confirmed Prince’s place as pop’s most commanding star of the moment.

In the confines of those tightly structured shows, Prince reveled in special effects and over-the-top staging – doing splits or somersaults, playing his famous ejaculating guitar (using Ivory Liquid, of course) or pretending to talk to the Lord during the “Purple Rain” B side “God.” Yet the tour impacted on him in ways he and the Revolution never expected. In time for the upcoming deluxe reissue of the Purple Rain album – with accompanying bonus audio and video material – and the tour’s inclusion on Rolling Stone’s 50 Greatest Concerts of the Last 50 Years list, RS spoke with the Revolution and the band’s unofficial member, lighting director LeRoy Bennett, about those momentous five months and their aftermath.


I. Preparations

Wendy Melvoin (guitarist): I remember being conscious that the Purple Rain tour was the biggest thing he had ever done [during planning stages]. I kept seeing sketches of plans and Prince would buzz in and out of the rooms. We were all being fitted for clothes that were being made. I was standing on one of those pill boxes, and there are about five people doing the measurements on me. It was like Queen Victoria being dressed for a gathering. At one point, one of them tried to do an inseam on my pant leg, and I felt really oddly like, “Fuck this – I’m not entitled to this. Why is this happening?”

Prince walked in and asked me to come outside so he could talk to me. Apparently he had been watching what was going on and he took me outside and goes, “You have to allow this to happen. You have to allow them to do what it is that they do. That’s why they’re here. And don’t feel bad about it.” At that very moment, I realized, “OK. There’s something else happening here, and I just have to let this happen.” I didn’t want to get in the way of how he was trying to represent himself. And that was a big, big a-ha! moment for me. I sat back and saw this thing unfold.


LeRoy Bennett (lighting director): The theatrics started to become more and more evident. Controversy had a little bit and the 1999 tour had a bit more theatrics in it. But the Purple Rain tour was a major step in technology for us. Once you’ve seen a laser beam for five minutes, you’re done with it. So what we were doing was pushing the lasers and different things through fiber optics. We had dry-ice fog, but we used liquid nitrogen a lot. For “When Doves Cry,” we’d have jets that shot horizontally across the stage. It almost looked like ghosts that flew across, met in the middle of the stage and dissipated. Other [lights] came up from the back like these huge fountains. We wanted the show to be more of an immersive experience. We wanted to portray the emotions of the songs and create interesting environments.

Melvoin: As far as signing a non-disclosure, like “You’re not allowed to do drugs,” I had heard his crew had to do something like that, but we as a band didn’t have to. But he didn’t like it when you drank in public and someone took a picture of it. He would get really buzzed if you had a picture taken with a beer because it’s like, “I don’t want children to think they can be badass only with a beer in their hand!” I understood it. I got it. There was a little bit of a weirdness, but I understood it was a business he was trying to run, and I respected it.

Matt Fink (keyboardist): Very few bands – pop bands, which I suppose you could say we were at that time – were doing coordinated dance moves while they were on their instruments. Keyboard players like myself, you didn’t really see them doing choreographed moves with the bands. But Prince wanted the whole band moving.

Mark Brown (a.k.a. BrownMark, bassist): I grew up in a time period where I would go see Cameo and the whole band was always moving. I was always asked to help with the choreography [for Prince], and so, when we would build the shows, I was kind of responsible for all of the movement. I had to figure out a way, with this different type of music, to create movement that was simple and where you could still play your instrument effectively. It was a challenge because not everybody was used to dancing and playing.

Lisa Coleman (keyboardist): We would just have to bend our bodies or shake our heads. Sometimes it got kind of rough too because I was wearing high heels and playing keyboards. It ruined my back for the rest of my life.

Fink: We were at Rudolphs Bar-B-Que [in Minneapolis] one late night and I remember Prince saying to me, “Do you think it would be cool if Bobby was standing up playing drums?” And I said, “How does a drummer stand up?” He wanted so badly for Bobby to stand up and play drums. But it worked because we had the drum machine running and Bobby was playing percussion and cymbals against the drum machine.

Bobby Z. (a.k.a. Robert Rivkin, drummer): No drummers had been required to do choreography. That was just the Prince world. We’d practice in front of a mirror. Looking at yourself was hard. He made us all look graceful, like in a ballet, because you don’t want to be a dork.

Melvoin: We had two weeks of productions rehearsals, I think in St. Paul, right before the tour started. I remember the first day we went in for full-on production, and that was astonishing to see it. That’s when I realized it, “Holy shit, this is massive. We’re in a stadium right now in production rehearsals.” I know it doesn’t sound like much right now, but back then it was like, “Oh, my God.”

Bennett: We spent more time in rehearsal than we had ever done before. It was almost like we did a tour of Minneapolis because we kept changing venues once a week, or once a week and half.

Bobby Z.: It was all about how he entered the stage. At various shows it was, “OK, now you have the gymnasium and the catwalk.” The biggest thing they had were the elevators under the stage for “Let’s Go Crazy.” There was a mannequin for when he would appear and disappear. There were all these cool magic tricks to get Prince on and off stage.

Brown: For the “When Doves Cry” scene, you had this stage prop of the claw-foot tub up on a hydraulic lift behind Bobby that was way up high. The first time they tried using the tub, which was very lightweight and made out of fiberglass, Prince got into it and they had not nailed it down into the platform. That thing went right over backwards once he got in it. He took quite a tumble. He just lay there while they checked him out, and fortunately he just had some good bruising. Things got called that day while they figured out what needed to be changed on that one. That was a scary moment.

Bennett: My heart stopped. He didn’t really fall that far, like four feet. But it shook him up a little bit. He walked off the stage, got in his car – which he always parked next to the stage in the arena – and took off. That was the end of rehearsals for the day. The carpenters changed the lyrics to “this is the sound when tubs fly.”

Melvoin: If Prince was doing any kind of bad behavior – if he was mean or just straight-up wrong about something he said he was straight-up right about – he always said something bad would happen to him. The way I remember that moment is that he had gotten into a fight with his manager. Prince was in a super-cranky mood and he was practicing his move with the bathtub and the bathtub fell. He was so freaked by it that he was super nice and kind [laughs]. Very humble.


Fink: The soundchecks were always three hours long. I would have a boom box on stage – everybody usually did – and we’d record those soundchecks because afterwards you’d want to listen to it in the dressing room to refresh your memory as to what we just learned, because it had to be played that night. That’s the way I could get through it and remember it.

Melvoin: Our soundchecks would start at like 2 in the afternoon and we’d play until 5. Each person would have to keep running out to get hair and makeup done. We wouldn’t leave to go back to the hotel after soundcheck. We had to stay there. The show would go on at 8.

Brown: Before the show, we’d all huddle up and pray. He’d point to you or tell you to lead if you had a bad day or a good day. He would speak when he had something to say. It was a meaningful ritual. You felt like you needed protection. The crowds were so loud and it was so crazy that we needed each other because that was the only thing you had – each other for support.

Fink: It was non-denominational. If someone was sick at home you’d talk about that. You just said whatever you had to say. It was a critical moment, especially when he spoke. He really said a lot of profound wisdom during those circles. He would reveal a little bit more of himself in those moments.

Melvoin: I used to think of it more as like tandem sky divers. We’d form that circle and say, “Just get us through this and make it run smoothly for him.” It became superstitious and it bothered me to some degree. But I appreciated the tradition, and I think everybody relied on it.

Coleman: Sometimes he would say weird things like, “This might be the last time we play,” or “I might break up the band,” or give us strange motivations like that just to go out onstage and kill it.

II. The Tour Begins

Coleman: When we got to Detroit [for the first show], suddenly we had bodyguards. “What? Bodyguards?!” Wendy and I had one and so did the guys. I remember getting to the hotel and guys carrying our bags, and the whole feeling was like, “Uh-oh. This is different.”

Fink: I think there were 105 people out there with us. Twelve buses. It was a massive undertaking. I knew, “Wow, we’re in the real big time now.”

Melvoin: In 1984, '85, that was the beginning of massive stadium shows. Def Leppard would always be two venues ahead of us, and Bruce Springsteen was doing Born in the U.S.A at the same time. We were all following each other in these huge caravans.

Coleman: [The first show in Detroit] was one of the loudest things I’ve ever heard. It’s like when sports teams come out onto the field. We were hitting the stage and it’s as if we were coming out from the locker room, you know? People were screaming and hanging over the rails and reaching for us. They knew our names, more than ever because of the film. We all kind glanced at each other like, “Holy shit!”

Bennett: The hair stood up on my arms. It still does thinking about it. It was just insane because none of us had experienced anything like that before. Suddenly we were elevated to a much higher level than we ever anticipated and it was a bit overwhelming. You had to really fight hard to concentrate on what you were supposed to do during the show, because you couldn’t believe what was going on.

Melvoin: When they turned the lights off and you’d stand by the side of the stage and hear, “Ladies and gentlemen …,” it was deafening. To this day, I have never heard anything like that. It was so loud that my ears became distorted at one point.

Brown: It was hard to hear yourself onstage. The audience would settle down after the first couple songs, but still … I had a huge bass rig. And even with all of that equipment, I would only hear it if I walked back by the bass amp. You’d feel the beat, but there were moments where you could get lost.

Fink: The loudest white noise possible.

Bennett: There were times where I couldn’t hear myself talking to the spotlight operators and they were having a hard time hearing me. It was crazy.

Bobby Z: Then Prince would rile them back up. He’d shake his ass or do a costume change or something, and people would go nuts again.

Coleman: The fun part was watching him, because a lot of things didn’t happen unless he gave us visual cues. It was like a game watching him run around the stage, and he would do a slight move of his hand, which would cue a riff or something. You’d have to watch pretty darn closely. Every once in a while, to cue the end of a song, he’d throw a hankie into the air, and when the hankie hit the ground, that’s when we would stop. So you had to be able to see the ground, and if you’re backed up on a riser behind keyboards and cymbals, sometimes it was hard to see, like, “Oh no! The hankie disappeared!”

Bennett: He would do hand signals for certain musical turnarounds, so you would have to watch for all that. He liked to mess around. Every once in a while, he would just do the signal in front of his chest, so the band could see it and I couldn’t. He would just do it to be funny.

Coleman: He’d say “Body Heat.” Bobby would hit the snare drum once and then we’d have to go to “Body Heat.” Then he’d stop that by saying, “'Rumble’ in E.” So we had all these different things, little modular funky things that we could put together that he could call out like we were his jukebox or drum machine that he could play. It was like a live computer.

Bobby Z: The crowd could feel it was tight and spontaneous, but it also had some train wrecks. Ninety-nine percent of the time it was a miracle.

Melvoin: I had boots on, tons of jewelry, and my instrument and I had to sing and do choreography. It was literally the Olympics. We were like synchronized swimmers. If someone screwed up that thing, there’s not even a bronze medal. You’re just off the team. This was high stakes.

Bobby Z.: At our Syracuse show, he called out “sway from side to side,” and the entire Revolution moved like a piston in an engine back and forth.

Coleman: We were wearing all these big … what do you call it? These regal New Romantics clothes? It was hot. I’d go up onstage wearing a cape on top of a dress, and I would just take off stuff during the show. Shed as much as I could. It was hot onstage with all those ruffles.

Melvoin: One of the things that Prince would tell us before going on tour, especially at the beginning of Purple Rain, was, “If you feel yourself rushing and playing too fast, cut your body’s heart rhythm in half and move your body in half-time, and you will play behind the beat.” We were religious about it.

Coleman: Prince wanted always be as good as the film. He didn’t want anyone ever to go, “Oh, that’s the band from the movie? Eww, they’re not as good.” That was one of his worst fears.

Brown: We used to get fined if we made mistakes, and I got to a point where I would stop playing bass notes in certain types of segues and start this rumbling on the bass. Prince loved that crap. And it saved me from a lot of fines.

Coleman: If you missed a cue or played an extra horn punch or something, that was $500. He would withhold your money. It never happened to me. I’m lucky. Actually, I’m good at faking it. He never knew when I made a mistake.

Melvoin: He threatened to take your paycheck away, and a couple times he tried, but we all laughed at him and said, “No, that’s not going to happen.” It was this warning, this threat, and he was really happy to go ahead and make the threat because it would make you get your shit together if you had made a mistake.

III. The Intensity

Coleman: When we were at the Superdome in New Orleans, it was, what, 90,000 people? We knew it was big because it sounded big, and then Prince said, “LeRoy, turn on the house lights!” And we turn on the house lights and it was scary. Prince was like, “Noooo! Turn them off, turn them off!” It was too much. It was an ocean of people.

Melvoin: I loved when we turned the lights on during “Take Me with You” and we could actually see the audience. We would turn on the stadium lights full blast – fluorescent, horrible lighting – and we could see everybody in the audience and we all became one and sang “Take Me With You.” You see every seat filled. You look to your left and you see everybody. You look to your right. It was incredible, and they all sang it. It was really beautiful.

Bennett: It must have been scary to them because they had no idea there were that many people. I’m sure the first time they saw that, they shit themselves [laughs].

Brown: We were literally the hardest-working band in show business. I would feel sorry when he would invite people to play with us onstage, because they didn’t understand that type of dedication. When people would sit in with us, they didn’t even know what to do. I don’t care how seasoned a musician they were.

Bobby Z: Everybody came in the band’s room, like Springsteen and Madonna [during a multi-show run at the Forum in Los Angeles in February 1985]. We had an open-door policy and got to meet a lot of fun people. Onstage, they always thought it was exciting. But onstage with Prince it was always a game.

Coleman: It became a take-no-prisoners situation, like, “Yeah, let’s just go out there and conquer the world.” And all the people that were supposed to be the competition were just like saying, “Wow!” to Prince. And again, he wanted to soak that up. He wanted to experience it firsthand, so that was a good way to do it.


Melvoin: Unfortunately he would kind of screw with people, especially big famous artists who would come up. If he sensed they were a little bit lost, he’d try and expose that: grab a guitar and do a blistering solo in their face. There was a certain amount of, like, straight-up competitive humiliation. But he thrived on that, like, “I know I’m great.”

Coleman: With Bruce, I remember Prince being a bit of an imp and trying to throw him off. He was giving us his secret hand signals while Bruce was trying to play a guitar solo. There was a little cat and mouse going on. I never knew if Bruce knew Prince was doing that because there was a bit of giggling, but we knew and were like, “No, don’t do that, it’s so mean!”

Fink: Prince was reveling in it. It was his goal to tower over everybody in a lot of ways. He loved it. With Madonna, they were flirting and playing.

Coleman: I have to admit I’m such a dork. I didn’t know who Madonna was. This girl came onto the stage and I was like, “Who’s that?” I thought he just pulled some girl up on the stage. I didn’t know what was going on until I was in the bathroom after the show.

Melvoin: Madonna came backstage and was in our dressing room, mine and Lisa’s, and wanted to use the bathroom. It was this true girl moment. We were each in our stalls peeing at the same time and she goes, “You guys are such badasses!” That was my first introduction to Madonna.

Coleman: We always had jams [during the encores]. “Baby I’m a Star” was notorious. “Purple Rain” could be 30 minutes long. We could stretch things out.

Bennett: We used to do a running bet with the crew on how long “Purple Rain” was going to be. Every night. I’m not a betting man, so I never got involved, but in the production office, there was a board where people would place their bets on the time. It was usually extended between 20 to 25 minutes. You could win a couple hundred bucks.

Coleman: During that time, Prince was very positive and didn’t want to miss what it meant to the world. He would read every magazine, whatever press. He wanted to see it all, good or bad. And then he wanted to affect it in a positive way, and he started doing more philanthropic things. We started playing at schools or doing food drives.

Melvoin: On that tour we’d be onstage for hours and then of course we’d end up doing another show afterwards or we’d do a show during the day somewhere else. It was full on every night until the last show. I remember we went to Gallaudet, the school for the deaf [in Washington, D.C.] and did the entire show in their auditorium, and it was incredible. There were huge monitors on the floor in the audience so the kids could feel the bottom end. I remember at least 25 signers in the audience who were watching us and signing all the words to every song. The kids loved it. And then they broke it down and we went to the stadium and played another show that night.

Fink: By the end of it, we were changing some arrangements. Prince still put us through mental gymnastics every day. He’d make a new transition between certain songs and you had to remember it. It was like a game to him. But Prince cut the tour short. Around the World in a Day was on his mind and backstage we were already looking at album covers for that.

Brown: During soundchecks, we recorded “4 the Tears in Your Eyes.” “The Ladder.” All kinds of stuff.

IV. The Aftermath

Coleman: By the end of the tour, he was done with [Purple Rain]. He just burned fast and hard. If you look at the concert footage, he was killing his body. It was really, really hard work and to do it for six months was plenty for him. He was starting to get excited about other things. He was ready to move on.

Bennett: Prior to that tour, we were all very close, but then it started to separate out so that he was very isolated from us towards the end of the tour. I think he anticipated the fame to a certain level, but not what that was. It sounds good in theory until it actually happens. I can’t say it frightened him, but it definitely threw him off. He was just withdrawing. I used to spend a ton of time with him back in Minneapolis over at his house and doing things with him like going to movies. That all started to go away and disappear at a certain degree during that tour. It eventually got to the point where it was us and him. And it started to suck.

Coleman: At first it was just one bus for the whole band. Then the boys had a bus, and Wendy and I had a bus. And Prince had his own bus.

Melvoin: From Purple Rain through Sign 'O’ the Times were his strongest mental and physical times. He wasn’t beaten down by any of it. It gave him incredible strength. There was a certain sort of naïveté about him during that time where he wasn’t second-guessing himself. He handled it really beautifully and wasn’t a frivolous little boy at all. He knew what his responsibility was, and he felt great about it. I don’t know how strong that feeling was for him in his later years. He handled it great at the time, but I’m sure that ultimately what it did to him is whittle away at a certain kind of deep self-esteem about himself. How could anybody reconcile that kind of power and success without it screwing with you deeply?

Coleman [on Prince not participating in “We Are the World” near the end of the tour]: It was the night of the Grammys – we’d done so well and everything was so positive. He just messed up big. I didn’t get why he wouldn’t be involved in that. I can’t really speak to that, honestly, because I didn’t really understand his thinking on it then. I think he just saw a whole bunch of pop stars getting together to “do good,” and I think he thought that was kind of bullshit, in a way.

But if you weren’t going to go there, then just don’t be seen. He was out [that night] and his bodyguard punched somebody or something. When the bad press came out it was like, “Don’t talk about it. … Nobody mention that.” So ridiculous! I thought it was most unfortunate. It was totally the opposite of what he preached.

Bennett: That whole period was so magical. You could just feel the energy of his stardom just skyrocketing. He could’ve continued to write major hits like all the songs on Purple Rain. I think it just became too easy. It wasn’t pushing him and challenging himself, because he constantly challenged himself. He did that with all of us, too. He pushed me to be more than I thought I could be. He would see who you are, what he saw you could do, and most of the time beyond what you believed you could do. And he would just push you there.

Brown: The confidence level that Prince created in all of us – you did anything. You did whatever to win the game.

Melvoin: It was thrilling. It was this roller-coaster feeling: “Woo, God, it’s scary, but I love it!” It felt like the world had opened up and we were going ahead and being allowed to make our dreams come true on that tour.

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On this day in music history: November 20, 1995 - “Beatles Anthology 1” by The Beatles is released. Produced by Tony Meehan, George Martin and Jeff Lynne, it is recorded at Phillips’ Sound Recording Services, Liverpool, UK, 20 Forthlin Road, Allerton, Liverpool, UK, Friedrich-Ebert-Halle, Hamburg, Germany, Decca Studios, BBC Maida Vale Studios, The London Palladium, Prince of Wales Theatre, IBC Studios and Abbey Road Studios in London, CBS Television Studio, The Dakota in New York City and The Mill Studios in Peasmarsh, East Sussex, UK from July 1958 - March 1994. The first of three double CD sets (also released as a three LP vinyl set), the sixty track compilation album is the audio accompaniment to the three part mini series on the history of the iconic rock band. It features outtakes, alternate versions and rare live performances of some of their best known songs and earliest recordings. The album also includes “Free As A Bird”, the first new song from The Beatles in twenty five years. It is constructed from a home cassette demo recorded by John Lennon in 1977, then completed by the surviving members (in February - March 1994). The single peaks at #6 on the Hot 100 on January 6, 1996, winning two Grammy Awards for Best Pop Performance By A Duo Or Group With Vocals and Best Shortform Video in 1997. “Anthology 1” debuts at number one on the Billboard Top 200, spending three weeks at the top, and is certified 8x Platinum in the US by the RIAA.