atomic weapon

I think it’s really important to remember that Steve’s perspective, coming in to Civil War, is still very heavily influenced by WWII. The movie calls back to this significantly in a few instances, and for good reason; WWII was a global clusterfuck. Governments made bad choices, some worse than others, and a lot of people died before alliances of nations bothered to get involved. Even the ‘good guys’ made the call to drop atomic weapons, which would be a recent discovery for Steve. He was shit at taking orders then, same as now, because Steve has always done what he personally saw as right, knowing that governments and councils might not make the moral call, or might wait too long to make it. 

We see this when Tony busts out FDR’s fountain pens, apparently in some attempt to appeal to Steve’s nostalgia. But Steve has lived through the war those pens brought his country in to, and seen the far-reaching consequences of one man signing a document – it’s not something he can take lightly. 

He’s still almost on board though, until Wanda being held in the compound comes up. And the word Steve uses then is very important:

Internment.

The internment of American citizens of Japanese ancestry is not a distant memory to Steve; for him, it happened only a few years ago, and his friend and comrade-in-arms, Jim Morita, would probably have had family in internment camps. All supposedly for the greater good and safety of the nation. Steve balking and balking hard makes a lot of sense; even if Wanda is technically in a cushy situation, what happens when more enhanced people turn up? Ones Tony doesn’t have room for? What precedent is set for imprisoning them if he agrees to this? 

Steve has always been about the individual right to choose what is moral. The kid who didn’t want to kill anybody, just stop the bullies, is the same guy who doesn’t want to sign over his will and his shield to others, to step in and follow orders given to him, regardless of what they are.

(Steve remembers all too clearly the acts of men just following orders.)

3

Vz.52/57 rifle with 1PN58 scope

Manufactured in Czechoslovakia c.1952~59 by ČZUB - serial number GR30507.
7,62x39mm 10-round detachable box magazine, reloaded mostly using stripper clips, gas operated semi-automatic fire, folding 20cm long steel bayonet, fitted with a Russian 1PN58 3,5X night vision scope.

So cold war.

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A look into Japan, a nation torn between peace and preparation

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s desire to remove pacifist constraints on the Self-Defense Forces from Japan’s post-WWII constitution has found more support among the Japanese people now that North Korea has nuclear weapons. Nevertheless, Abe’s objective can be a hard sell for many Japanese citizens, who view peace as central to the nation’s identity.

Yahoo News journalist Michael Walsh traveled to Tokyo, Hiroshima and Nagasaki from Nov. 5 to Nov. 11 on a fellowship from Foreign Press Center Japan to discuss the nation’s current security challenges, commitment to pacifism and collective memory of the atomic bombings. Every person interviewed shared a commitment to keeping Japan safe while promoting peace and nuclear disarmament. But there was disagreement over the right path to this goal. (Michael Walsh/Yahoo News)

Photos by Michael Walsh/Yahoo News

Read: Japan’s atomic dilemma: Pacifism and the threat of North Korea »

See more photos from “A look into Japan and our other slideshows on Yahoo News.

what if humans are one of the few beings to invent atomic weapons without destroying ourselves?

atomic weapons were the product of einstein’s theories, introduced into the crucible that was world war 2. if the theories had been introduced during a time of peace, the idea to weaponize it may not have occurred to anyone. It may have simply turned into another way of producing energy, since creating a fission reactor is easier than making a bomb. It is conceivable that other alien races also had similar revelations during a time of war, but how many would survive such a revelation? We nearly destroyed ourselves in our time, a less prudent or less fortunate humanity might have simply bombed themselves to death by accident.

In other words, imagine other alien’s shock and horror when they find that humans have enough firepower in just 100 of those bombs to cause a nuclear winter and completely wreck a planet’s ecosystem, all 100 of which could easily fit on a standard star cruiser. an alien invading earth now would have to contend with over 15000 such weapons spread across the globe. Assuming production of bombs continues in the future, every human ship in time of war could be outfitted with the necessary power to destroy a planet.

Aside from humanity, only the most advanced species in the galaxy possess this kind of power, with plasma rail guns based off solar flairs which can glass planets. This makes humanity a contender for dominance with even the most advanced of species.