atlantic ocean north

vine

North carolina shoreline sunrise.

The biggest wave ever recorded by meteorologists happened between the UK and Iceland

  • A record-breaking wave the height of a six-story building formed in the North Atlantic Ocean, between the United Kingdom and Iceland.
  • The World Meteorological Organization expert committee announced Tuesday that the wave was recorded by a buoy on Feb. 4, 2013, and measured a whopping 62.3 feet (19 meters). Read more

follow @the-future-now

6

The Greenland Shark is a prehistoric shark, it has an extra gill slit than the modern day shark, so it comes from another era. It lives thousands of feet on the bottom of the North Atlantic Ocean, so very few people know about it. The Greenland Shark is known to live up to 200 years old. Parasites latch onto the eye of the shark and feed off the tissue of the eye, rendering the shark blind. But they have no problem hunting for food, they have incredible smell and, like most sharks, they can sense the vibrations that prey give off.

A short Ford and Mabel bonding fic for @stariousfalls just because. You’re wonderful Syd!


It was a bright sunny day somewhere in the north Atlantic Ocean. A brisk salty breeze moved their boat along at a steady clip and Ford relished the warmth of the sun and the wind as it ruffled his hair as he jotted down some last minute observations in his journal. He was startled from his thoughts when his phone began to buzz. Setting aside his writing, he picked it up and looked at the caller ID. It was Mabel.

Now that was odd. Not that he wasn’t happy to receive a surprise call from his favorite niece, but, according to his calculations, she should still be in school. He answered it.

Keep reading

Mystery of the Bermuda Triangle solved? Hexagonal clouds creating terrifying air bombs with 170mph winds may be to blame for disappearing ships and planes, scientists claim

By GARETH DAVIES. PUBLISHED: October 21, 2016
  • Bermuda Triangle has been been blamed for hundreds of missing vessels
  • The 500,000km square patch in the North Atlantic Ocean is still unsolved
  • Scientists now believe the clouds and weather phenomenons are to blame
  • The so-called air bombs can create waves of up to 45ft, experts have said

Hexagonal clouds creating terrifying air bombs with winds of 170mph could be behind the mystery of the Bermuda Triangle. Scientists have claimed the stormy blasts can flip ships into the sea and bring planes crashing down into the sea. The mystifying 500,000km square patch in the North Atlantic Ocean has been blamed for the disappearance of at least 75 planes and hundreds of ships, but the oddly-shaped clouds may hold the secret to the vanishing acts.  

^ Hexagonal clouds creating terrifying air bombs with winds of 170mph could be behind the mystery of the Bermuda Triangle

^ The mystifying 500,000km square patch in the North Atlantic Ocean has been blamed for the disappearance of at least 75 planes and hundreds of ships, but the oddly-shaped clouds may hold the secret to the vanishing acts

^ The winds created by the so-called air bombs are so powerful they generate 45ft high winds

The winds created by the so-called air bombs are so powerful they generate 45ft high winds. Meteorologist Randy Cerveny told the Mirror: ‘These types of hexagonal shapes over the ocean are in essence air bombs. 'They are formed by what are called microbursts and they’re blasts of air that come down out of the bottom of a cloud and then hit the ocean and then create waves that can sometimes be massive in size as they start to interact with each other.’

Researchers added massive clouds were appearing over the western tip of Bermuda Island – ranging from 20 to 55 miles across - and Dr Steve Miller, satellite meteorologist at Colorado State University told Science Channel’s What on Earth said: 'You don’t typically see straight edges with clouds. 'Most of the time, clouds are random in their distribution.' Scientists believe these weather phenomenons are behind the Bermuda Triangle mystery, according to the Mirror. At least 1,000 lives have been lost in the Triangle in the last 100 years. On average, four planes and 20 ships go missing every year.