atef crown

Thoth (ibis-headed and wearing the Triple ‘Atef’-Crown with ram’s horns) offering the symbol for Eternity (an image of the God 'Heh’) to the Sacred Living Falcon of Horus represented upon a podium carried by a lion.
Temple of Horus at Behdet (Edfu),
detail from the scenes related to the the Feast of “Opening the Year of the Reign of Horus” represented on the north inner side of the Girdle Wall,
second register of the west part.

(the images have been impiously hammered by the christians…)

the King, Ptolemy IX Soter II, offering the symbol for Eternity (an image of the God Heh) and three sprigs; behind Him, the King’s Mother, Cleopatra III (wearing the Solar disk with cow’s horns and the two feathers).
The King is represented wearing a composite Triple ‘Atef’ Crown with ram’s horns, two uraei, and three sacred falcons (each wearing the Solar disk).
Temple of the God Horus at Behdet (Edfu),
detail from the scenes related to the the Feast of “Opening the Year of the Reign of Horus” represented on the north inner side of the Girdle Wall,
lower register of the east part, detail from the III scene.

(the images have been impiously hammered by the christians…)

we’re happy to announce that our book
“EGYPTIAN RELIGIOUS CALENDAR - Great Year of Ra CDXVII-CDXVIII (2017 CE)”,
the Complete Egyptian Religious Calendar with all the religious prescriptions and the sacred festivities for the next year 2017, is almost completed and it will be available on amazon.com around the middle of the current month.

Here’s a preview of the cover, detail from the back-cover:
scene from the astronomical ceiling of the Outer Hypostyle Hall of the Temple of the Goddess Hathor at Nitentóre (Jwnt-t3-Nṯrt, Dendera), second strip east.
The God Thoth standing in a sacred barque and offering the ‘Udjat’-Eye to the God Iah (the Moon-God); to the left, a falcon-headed God with the steering oars.
Thoth is represented ibis-headed, wearing the 'Atef’-Crown with the two feathers and ram’s horns; Iah wears the Lunar disk with the Crescent and holds the 'Uas’-scepter and the 'Ankh’

Nestanebisheru (wearing on her head a perfume cone) holding a scepter and making adorations to the God Osiris (mummiform, wearing the ‘Atef’-Crown with ram’s horns, holding the 'Heqa’-scepter and the Flail).
Detail from the “Book of Coming Forth by Day” (sheet 89) of Nestanebisheru (ca. 940 BCE), daughter of the High Priest of Amon-Ra Pinedjem II; now in the British Museum…

Temple of the God Horus at Behdet (Edfu),
detail from the scenes related to the the Feast of “Opening the Year of the Reign of Horus” represented on the north inner side of the Girdle Wall,
lower register of the west part, detail from the III scene:
the King, Ptolemy IX Soter II, offering an ointment vessel.
The King is represented wearing a composite ‘Atef’-Crown with ram’s horns, two high feathers, the winged scarab, two Lion-headed Uraei, and the two volutes of the naos’ sistrum; on the top, five Solar orbs.

(the image has been impiously hammered by the christians…)

the Great God Osiris enthroned inside a shrine; on the top, the Winged Solar Orb, and the Solar Orb with the Two Uraei flanked by the Two Eyes.
Osiris is represented black-skinned, mummiform, wearing the ‘Atef’-Crown with ram’s horns and holding the flail, the 'Uas’ and the 'Heqa’ scepters; He is mummiform and entirely covered by the 'Ankh’-'Djed’-'Uas’ on the 'neb’-basket hieroglyphs, whose meaning is “All Life, Stability, and Dominion”. Behind Him, the Goddess Nekhbet, vulture-headed and wearing the White Crown, spreading Her wings in protection.

Detail from the “Book of Coming Forth by Day” of the scribe Nebqed, reign of King Amenhotep III; now in the Louvre Museum…

Double Temple of Haroeris and Sobek at Ombos,
detail from the north-west wall of the Inner Hypostyle (from the west side dedicated to Haroeris):
the God Haroeris Khenty-Jrty (falcon-headed, wearing the White Crown) holding three ‘Year’-rods with the 'Heb-Sed’ sign (the symbol of the Royal Jubilee) and giving the falcon-headed 'khepesh’-blade to King Ptolemy VIII Euergetes II (wearing the 'Atef’-Crown with ram’s horns and holding the 'Uas’-scepter)

Temple of the Goddess Isis at Philae,
scenes from the Gateway of the First Pylon, inner face, east side (the King represented is Nectanebo I):

-on the top (that is the lintel),
(at left) the King (wearing the Red Crown) offering a statuette of Maat to Shu (wearing the Four-feathered Crown),
(at right) the King (wearing the Blue Crown) offering wine to Khnum (ram-headed, wearing the ‘Atef’-Crown with the two feathers) and Sati (Sṯjt, wearing the White Crown with gazelle or antelope horns)

-on the jamb,
(lower register) the King offering incense to Anuki
(upper register) the King (wearing the 'Atef’-Crown with the two feathers and ram’s horns) offering a plate with food to Isis

(the images have been impiously hammered by the christians…)

The central scene shows Tutankhamun and Ankhesenamun (named in cartouches) within an elaborate kiosk which has a double cornice topped by a frieze or uraei with disks, and above this is a winked sun-disk. The king sits casually on a throne, his feet on a footstool. He wears elaborate dress and the atef-crown, usually associated with Osiris and the dead king. The king is not dead here: he is approached by Ankhesenamun who presents a bouquet, and gently touches the king. The scene is closely similar to the one on the back of the gilded shrine. In both cases the queen wears a feathered headdress, but on the shrine the king wears the blue crown. Elaborate floral arrangements flank the royal pair. Beneath the kiosk, and symbolically under the feet of the king, are shown two prone foreign captives, an Asiatic and a Nubian. Two identical scenes occupy the ends of this piece, set at right angles to the main scene. The king is shown as a sphinx with human arms holding up in front of him a figure of Ma’at, goddess of truth and order, holding the ankh-sign of life, and squatting on a basket. There is a pendant uraeus and a sun-disk above the sphinx’s head, and over his back is a protective vulture holding an ostrich feather fan.

Egypt : The Treasures of the Great Pharaohs - T.G.H. James