at least it exists

fireminer  asked:

When did the Arcade really become something? Was it before or after the Pinball machines became popular?

Arcades actually go back to the early 1900s in the US, where they were called Penny Arcades, and while they had slot machines and pinball, they also had things like love testers and Edison kinetiscopes where you could watch a woman take her clothes off.

People are often surprised to hear that the pinball machine didn’t have flippers until 1947 and they weren’t even at the bottom of the playfield until the early 1960s. Pinball (at least in the form it currently exists) is a lot newer than you think and is barely a decade older than the arrival of video games. The original form of pinball was basically a game of chance where a ball was dropped only to ding off metal pins at random and fall down holes with different payouts, very much like the modern game of pachinko.

Because Pinball was for gambling, there was a huge moral crusade against them in the early part of this century. On a personal note, my grandma used to tell me to stay away from “hooch, wild women, and pinball” (sorry Nani, I failed you on all three).

New York Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia declared war on pinball, and vowed to smash every single pinball machine that existed. Technically, pinball has only been legal in New York City since 1976.

What the Penny Arcades of the turn of the century actually had to offer wasn’t quite as important as who visited them, who the audience was for them: they were designed as cheap entertainment for the huge wave of American immigrants in big cities who had a little bit of money to spend. A major part of the reason movies were always a universal art form accessible to everyone (as opposed to something like ballet or theater) is that they had their origins with kinetiscope amusements consumed by immigrants in penny arcades, along with the nickelodeons that showed things like sports reels for boxing matches aimed at working class sports fans.

If I could be allowed a little digression, this is always why something like “upscale” movie theater chains like the Alamo Drafthouse make my skin crawl. Movies should be for the poor and for everyone, not for people who can shell out $14 for a bad order of hot wings, or a milkshake with wine in it. It’s a sinister sign of how wealth is massively concentrated in our new gilded age that these upscale theater chains target a shrinking percentage of the population with disposable income instead of the impoverished masses. The selling point of upscale movie theaters is that they automatically kick out anyone making noise, too, to create a “genteel” movie experience free of riff-raff, which I think is the kind of snotty crap a bad guy in a Rodney Dangerfield comedy would do. Recently, Alamo made waves for having all female showings of Wonder Woman. I have nothing against this idea (why would anyone be offended by this when you can see the movie in a thousand places?), but it comes off as phony grandstanding when done by a chain who’s sole reason for existing is delivering an experience for rich people. The living version of this image below: 

Returning to the original point, the key thing to remember about video games is this: in the beginning, they didn’t start off in the arcades, but were marketed toward bars and bowling alleys. This is why the marketing for these games in the early days was extremely adult. It kind of reminds me of how, come 2007 or so, the discussion around the Nintendo Wii was that it was a toy that could get you laid. Little by little, video games started to creep into the arcades.

The tipping point where the momentum shifted toward video games over pinball in the arcade was definitely Space Invaders in ’78, which was so wildly successful it showed that arcade video games were here to stay, and that they were a bigger moneymaker than the pinball machines were. There’s a story that Japan had a shortage of the ¥100 coin because of Space Invaders, which unfortunately is just too cool to be true, but it does go to show how it was a new cultural force that came in. 

anonymous asked:

i see your point about the black population in the caribbean being displaced by slavery originally. But that isnt why they are referred to as black and latin-those are simply the facts. Just like if a white person was born and raised in africa they would be white and african at least in a cultural or national sense. Also south africa still exists. So am I missing something? Not the original question asker, i just wasn't satisfied with your answer.

Bruh that argument sucks cause whites in Africa didn’t even want to call themselves African or the nationality of the country they invaded. Apartheid South Africa had signs that said “Europeans Only”

Eon

What really sucks about the way Joss Whedon writes is that he sort of has this idea that if he writes about women being strong and confident, that is all it takes for women to appreciate his work. Like, even if the villain constantly belittles a woman for being a woman and people are constantly harassing her and sexualizing her, it’s okay because she’s strong and she can take it.

The biggest difference between Whedon’s version of Wonder Woman and Jenkins is that in Whedon’s version Wonder Woman is A Woman. She (and the audience) must be constantly aware that she is a Woman, that she is Sexy, that she is overcoming incredible odds because she has the terrible disadvantage of Being Born A Woman.

Whereas in Jenkins’ film Diana simply exists. There are some points made by other characters about her being a woman, like when Steve won’t sleep with her because he feels it’s improper, or when his secretary says, “Oh yes, put specs on her, like after that she won’t be the most beautiful woman you’ve ever seen”, but Diana is almost completely unaware of her status as a Dreaded Woman. Her excitement over a baby? She’s literally never seen one before. Her little makeover seen? Spends the whole thing looking for something comfortable she can fight in. She basically never mentions the difference between men and women, never even says that women are better or whatever because she was raised by them. 

Joss Whedon would have never let Wonder Woman forget she was a Woman. She would have constantly been making comments about it, wether positive or negative, as would everyone around her. In Whedon’s heyday that might have flown a lot better, but now women seem to be a little sick of grrrrl power. They just want power. They just want to exist, both on screen and in life, without constant reminders that they are Women and that they must pay for that at every turn.

Personal favorites to come out of Danny Phantom recent events:

  • #ToastThatGhost
  • variations of Butch Hartman’s name like tumblr does with anyone else they hate starting with the infamous Benadoodle Cucumberpatch
  • “never forget Butch’s real name is Elmer, can’t unmake that canon can ya Elmer”
  • “Butch doesn’t give a dimmadamn about his own shows”
  • more trans and tan Danny content made out of spite
  • “are they so pale because they were locked in the basement for the 10 years the show was off air”
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fangirl challenge [1/15 male celebrities: Joe Keery 

“I did like, theater camp, when I was a little kid and made videos with my sisters and was interested in music, but didn’t ever want to sing. I thought it was cool to play music, for sure, or - I saw School of Rock! I saw that movie and I was like ‘Oh my God! That seems like the coolest thing ever!’ … We were like this is the real shit. We gotta start doing this.” 

i lov lance in the first episode. he’s a little bit of an ass, he takes charge and manages to lead his team, very confident even though he’s unsure, protective over hunk and pidge, intelligent to pick up clues about pidge keeping secrets, and you can see the insecurity on his face from the very first episode alone. he’s so multi-faceted just from this one ep alone??? voltron take notes!!!!!!

only bc blondejae is that binch & this fancam left me edgeless [flashing tw] c: silver lining youngjae

Tips on Flirting

1. Make eye contact. Throw small glances and catch the eye of the person you’re interested in. Hold their gaze briefly, then smile and look away.

2. Smile at the person. To be most effective, smile slowly (rather than grinning widely), and crinkle your eyes. That kind of smile is more genuine and appealing.

3. Talk to them. You don’t have to commit to a full conversation but at least say “hello” and acknowledge their existence!

4. Initiate a conversation with them (one step on from point 3). Think of easy ways to get a conversation going. In many ways the topic isn’t so significant. You just want to talk to them, and try and pique their interest. General guidelines are … ask a neutral question; try and find some areas of common interest; gauge their response before showing more interest; and keep things light and impersonal.

5. Make use of body language. Non-verbal cues can say a lot more than the actual words you speak. Some pointers to remember include: maintain an open stance (don’t cross your arms or legs); turn your body toward them; casually touch them (for example, hold their hand to help you balance when you’re getting up from your seat.)

6. Compliment them (but don’t get too personal yet).

7. Keep your interactions brief. Scarcity creates demand. If you’re not always available it makes you more mysterious and more desirable.

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They look at each other, their burdens lifted slightly, their pain not gone but mellowing. Words unsaid. - The Prom script | They both smile. Two old soldiers. - The Yoko Factor script | They are both pained and comforted by the powerful bond between them. - Forever script |