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The Amazing Work of  Larry Landolfi

When I moved to Kodiak, Alaska in May of 1980, I wasn’t there a day when I called my dad (the ‘photo-bug’ of the family) and told him to send me a camera, any camera, and send it quick. The camera was from a camera company I’d never heard of before or since (Bessler), but more importantly I was well on my way into the wonderful world of photography. Astronomy has always been another ‘love of my life’, and I think it shows in a lot of the composite photos shown here.

  About a dozen years ago my youngest brother Joe told me I should get into computers and this thing called Photoshop. Told me it was right up my alley in what I tried to take ‘in camera’. I flat out told him I already had 2 hobbies that were costing me thousands of dollars and really couldn’t afford another one. So glad I never took my own advice. Larry Landolfi
  I’ve been a successful stock photographer at ScienceSource.com (formerly PhotoResearchers.com) since 1996. http://images.sciencesource.com/search?api=110875667&pg=1
  Praise be to God for all the wonders of the universe and on this beautiful, temporary home called Earth.

Visit our Facebook                    Posted by Andrew

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Larry Landolfi

500p, Pinterest, Fine Art America

When I moved to Kodiak, Alaska in May of 1980, I wasn’t there a day when I called my dad (the “photo-bug” of the family) and told him to send me a camera, any camera, and send it quick. The camera was from a camera company I’d never heard of before or since (Bessler), but more importantly I was well on my way into the wonderful world of photography. Astronomy has always been another “love of my life”, and I think it shows in a lot of the composite photos shown here.

Located on the Colorado Plateau in northern Arizona, Vermilion Cliffs National Monument is a geologic treasure. This remote and unspoiled monument contains 280,000 acres of diverse landscapes — including the colorful swirling stone of the Wave (pictured here). For more stunning pics of the Wave and other parts of Vermilion Cliffs, check out our Steller story at http://on.doi.gov/1Nm62AW.

Photo of the Wave with the Milky Way shining overhead by Max Seigal (www.sharetheexperience.org).

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The Amazing Work of  Larry Landolfi 

Larry Landolfi

  When I moved to Kodiak, Alaska in May of 1980, I wasn’t there a day when I called my dad (the ‘photo-bug’ of the family) and told him to send me a camera, any camera, and send it quick. The camera was from a camera company I’d never heard of before or since (Bessler), but more importantly I was well on my way into the wonderful world of photography. Astronomy has always been another ‘love of my life’, and I think it shows in a lot of the composite photos shown here.
  About a dozen years ago my youngest brother Joe told me I should get into computers and this thing called Photoshop. Told me it was right up my alley in what I tried to take ‘in camera’. I flat out told him I already had 2 hobbies that were costing me thousands of dollars and really couldn’t afford another one. So glad I never took my own advice.
  I’ve been a successful stock photographer at ScienceSource.com (formerly PhotoResearchers.com) since 1996. http://images.sciencesource.com/search?api=110875667&pg=1
  Praise be to God for all the wonders of the universe and on this beautiful, temporary home called Earth.

Galaxies’ Gamma Rays May Illuminate Dark Matter

By Kate Becker

Dark matter is a riddle: Stars can feel it, but we can’t see it. It makes up 80% of the matter in the universe, yet we can only guess at what it actually is.

The puzzle began in 1933, when the Swiss astronomer Fritz Zwicky pointed out that galaxies in a group called the Coma Cluster seemed to be moving too quickly to be bound together by the cluster’s gravity. Stronger evidence followed in the 1960s and 1970s, when Vera Rubin’s studies of galactic rotation revealed that stars at the outer edge of spiral galaxies were rotating just as fast as those in the center. That extra speed should have sent them flying out into intergalactic space. Gravity held them back—but gravity from what? When astronomers estimated the total mass contained in all the stars, gas, and dust in the galaxies, it didn’t add up: Either the laws of gravity were wrong, or some invisible “dark matter” was hiding in the galaxies’ dim margins.

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 SATURDAY SPOTLIGHT: Small Objects

This is our catch-all tag for asteroids, meteors, and comets, which you can view individually if you have a particular interest in one type of object. Here you’ll find stunning photography and scientific explanations galore. Impress your friends and coworkers by knowing the difference between meteors, meteorites, and meteoroids! Flip out about the fact that we landed on a freakin’ comet! Get freaked about the possibility of an asteroid potentially obliterating our society as we watch, paralyzed, because our space program funding is continually gutted and de-prioritized and no amount of Aerosmith songs nor heroic sacrifices from rugged bald actors will save us! Look at some pretty meteor shower photos!

Click here for all your small flying space debris needs.

Image: Wally Pacholka captures a Geminid

Previous Saturday Spotlights

Black Hole Winds Quench Star Formation in Entire Galaxies

By Charles Q. Choi

Giant winds from black holes can blast gas through galaxies at extraordinary speeds, pulling the plug on star formation, researchers say.

This finding reveals how black holes can direct the fates of entire galaxies, scientists added.

The hearts of most and possibly all galaxies harbor supermassive black holes millions to billions of times the mass of the sun. Many are relatively quiet, like the one sitting at the center of the Milky Way. However, others, known as active galactic nuclei, voraciously devour their surroundings, potentially creating black hole winds.

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