astronomy

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Inspired by the Cosmos: Rustic Handmade Jewelry

Created seven years ago, Beauty Spot is now recognized as one of the most successful independent shops online. What began as a small project is now a full-time job, which requires passion and artistry.

Inspired by the beauty of the cosmos, the designers at Beauty Spot began building the “Your Space” project last year. After spending careful attention curating printed images of the galaxy, they are paired with rustic and antique brass chains, which add a vintage touch. Composed of a variety of materials, including acrylic plastic, resin, antique brass, all the planets and the moon’s beauty are featured in the form of pendants, rings, earrings and cufflinks.

A romantic project, the entire collection revolves around the constellations in our galaxy and the universe’s vast existence. A creation for dreamers, they allow you to take a sparkle of stardust everywhere with you. You can find this collection and their entire archive in their Etsy shop

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E. L. Trouvelot - Astronomical Atlas, 1881.

1. Mare Humorum, from a study made in 1875.
2. The Planet Mars, observed September 3, 1877.
3. Aurora Borealis, observed March 1, 1872.
4. Star Clusters in Hurcules, from a study made in June, 1877.
5. The Planet Jupiter, observed November 1, 1880.
6. The Great Nebula in Orion, from a study made in the years 1875-76.
7. The Zodiacal Light, observed February 20, 1876.
8. Total Eclipse of the Sun, observed in Wyoming, July 29, 1878.
9. Partial Eclipse of the Moon, observed October 24, 1874.
10. The Planet Saturn, observed on November 30, 1874. 

NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day 2016 February 5 

Massive Stars in NGC 6357 

Massive stars lie within NGC 6357, an expansive emission nebula complex some 6,500 light-years away toward the tail of the constellation Scorpius. In fact, positioned near center in this ground-based close-up of NGC 6357, star cluster Pismis 24 includes some of the most massive stars known in the galaxy, stars with nearly 100 times the mass of the Sun. The nebula’s bright central region also contains dusty pillars of molecular gas, likely hiding massive protostars from the prying eyes of optical instruments. Intricate shapes in the nebula are carved as interstellar winds and energetic radiation from the young and newly forming massive stars clear out the natal gas and dust and power the nebular glow. 

Enhancing the nebula’s cavernous appearance, narrowband image data was included in this composite color image in a Hubble palette scheme. Emission from sulfur, hydrogen, and oxygen atoms is shown in red green and blue hues. The alluring telescopic view spans about 50 light-years at the estimated distance of NGC 6357.

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Apollo Astronaut Edgar Mitchell Dies at Age 85

Astronaut Edgar Mitchell, lunar module pilot on Apollo 14, passed away Thursday in West Palm Beach, Fla., on the eve of the 45th anniversary of his lunar landing. Mitchell was the sixth man to walk on the Moon.

“To me, that (spaceflight) was the culmination of my being, and what can I learn from this? What is it we are learning? That’s important, because I think what we’re trying to do is discover ourselves and our place in the cosmos, and we don’t know. We’re still looking for that.” - Edgar Mitchell in 1997 interview for NASA’s oral history program. 

Source: NASA

Pluto’s Haze in Bands of Blue

This processed image is the highest-resolution color look yet at the haze layers in Pluto’s atmosphere. 

Scientists believe the haze is a photochemical smog resulting from the action of sunlight on methane and other molecules in Pluto’s atmosphere, producing a complex mixture of hydrocarbons such as acetylene and ethylene.  These hydrocarbons accumulate into small particles, a fraction of a micrometer in size, and scatter sunlight to make the bright blue haze seen in this image.

As they settle down through the atmosphere, the haze particles form numerous intricate, horizontal layers, some extending for hundreds of miles around Pluto. The haze layers extend to altitudes of over 120 miles (200 kilometers).

Credit: NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI