astronaut scientists

Okay, but, when we send cremated remains into space do we send an explanation with them? Because I’m just picturing some aliens cracking open a satellite and being really fucking confused.

“Human guide! Our scans indicate that this probe contains a cylinder full of ash and human bone fragments. I assume this deconstruction of form is a way for your species to travel greater distances through the stars due to your limited capacity for large spaceships and distance travel. Quite similar to the Quaxilains from the Centuri district of the galaxy, though I did not know your species had reached such advancements yet. Please instruct us in how to revive your colleague so we may interrogate him as well.”

“No, dude, whoever that was is dead. Probably some astronaut or scientist who paid to have their cremated remains shot into space once they died.”

“You told us that your species buried your dead, why did you lie to us?”

“No, I said that MY family buried our relatives. Never said the whole species did it. Sometimes we burn them, then scatter their ashes in places they loved, plant them with a tree, use them to make diamonds, shoot them into space, whatever. Lotta options.”

“I had no idea your death rituals were so…extensive.”

“Just wait until I tell you about mummification.”

Do not mess with Terran kids

 Okay so i’m  not a writer but i had this dream yesterday, that i can`t get out of my mind, and i thought i mind as well share it.


So it started with a group of alien scientists kidnapping 20 kids kids from earth for an experiment, the oldest child was 16 and the youngest was 4.

The aliens stuck them on this planet called Cycloptia–for some random reason.

Anyway Cycloptia was a little bigger than earths moon and had  three moons  and three seasons spring,summer and fall.

The landscape consisted of a lot of fields,hills, and a couple mountains, also a shit ton of ponds, lakes and streams though rivers were rarer. Also everything except the plants were pastel colored. 

Cycloptia actually had humanoid people living there, the adulds  were around 6`8 on average and had one eye, they had similar vocal cords as humans but had never developed a spoken language, instead they developed telepathic abilities and communicated mostly with feelings and thoughts. despite being completely  physically evolved, they lacked any kind of social structures and after reaching adulthood they wandered around alone, they survived solely by eating easily picked plants and dead animals, they had no concept of hunting,farming,building or well anything, at all.

Back to the children.

After a couple hours of panicking, Nebula, a 10 year old Australian girl, was the first to find her cool,and quickly put her Lyanna Mormont level badassness to use.

Luckily the aliens had gathered a fairly diverse group of kids together–who all spoke English,because of course they did

A daughter of a teacher and a policeman from Greenland, a son of a politician from New York, a pair of Swedish twins  whose parents were collage professors  in history, a teen from Nigeria whose mother was a therapist and Nebula herself who came from a large tight knit family filled with scientists, doctors,astronauts   and lawyers and a couple of astronomers.


The kids using random facts from their parents large field of jobs, stuff they saw from Tv and just otherwise random things they read that seemed smart,and started to formulate a plan for survival.

And surprisingly  they didn’t all die,it actually worked fairly well, withing a month they had built a couple of shelters, had a small list of things they knew to be edible and were building tools, one kid had pitched the idea of persistence hunting– its a hunting technique in which hunters, who may be slower than their prey over short distances, use a combination of running, walking and tracking to pursue prey until its exhausted– and effectively solved the issue of how to get food while exploring the planet.

Three moths in, they had a miniature village, all the children had clear jobs to keep them all alive,–hunting,farming,gathering,building etc- and some of the kids had started making random animals into pets, the kids that came from farms, found local animals that reminded them of  livestock and started domesticating them and started planting crops, meanwhile the Alien scientists were starting to worry–the children colonizing Cycloptia hadn't been in the realm of possibilities.


Five moths in, a child Cycloptian got lost and was then effectively adopted to the group of Terran kids, the Alien scientist had a collective freak out as the kids taught the Cycloptian how to –among other things- speak and write English,the basics of earth culture and how to preform a certain job–building.

A year in, the village had transformed into a large town, as more and more Cycloptians got `adopted` by the Terran kids.

The alien scientists   were freaking the fuck out, because the experiment had gotten waaay out of hand, the kids had effectively created a government and they were surely going to start to consider space travel next–in the eyes of the aliens humans developed space travel ridiculously fast, and they assumed that the Terran kid would be ladidadi-ing around space within 5 years.

Aaand that's  when i woke up. XD

Solar System: Things to Know This Week

Our social media accounts will help you explore our world, the solar system and beyond.

1. The Flagship Fleet

Start with our flagship accounts, where you can keep up with all the latest news and be a part of the conversation.

2. Your Galactic Neighborhood 

 Follow our Planetary Science Division to keep up with all the hardworking robots exploring the wild frontiers of our solar system.

3. Mission Space

From the sun to Pluto and points in between, many NASA missions share their science on a variety of social platforms.

4. NASA’s History

Need some nostalgia in your feed? Learn the history of our exploration of our home planet, our solar system and beyond.

5. Kids in Space

Find fun stuff for kids, parents and anyone who likes space and Earth science, including games, hands-on projects and fun facts.

6. The Big Picture

Our photographers take their cameras to some interesting places around the planet. 

7. Star Watch

This is a great way to follow our missions that study the sun, Earth and space itself as elements of a interconnected system.

8. NASA People

Want to know what it’s like to work for us? Learn about the science and adventures of astronauts, scientists and engineers exploring space.

9. NASA Earth

Our planet is changing, and NASA Earth is on it, using the vantage point of space to increase our understanding of Earth and improve lives.

10. Craving More?

Visit us at: https://www.nasa.gov/socialmedia

 for a listing of the agency’s current social media accounts. 

Discover more lists of 10 things to know about our solar system HERE.

Follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space: http://nasa.tumblr.com

6

black astronauts who have traveled into space [x]

10 “Spinoffs of Tomorrow” You Can License for Your Business

The job of the our Technology Transfer Program is pretty straight-forward – bring NASA technology down to Earth. But, what does that actually mean? We’re glad you asked! We transfer the cool inventions NASA scientists develop for missions and license them to American businesses and entrepreneurs. And that is where the magic happens: those business-savvy licensees then create goods and products using our NASA tech. Once it hits the market, it becomes a “NASA Spinoff.”

If you’re imagining that sounds like a nightmare of paperwork and bureaucracy, think again. Our new automated “ATLAS” system helps you license your tech in no time — online and without any confusing forms or jargon.

So, sit back and browse this list of NASA tech ripe for the picking (well, licensing.) When you find something you like, follow the links below to apply for a license today! You can also browse the rest of our patent portfolio - full of hundreds of available technologies – by visiting technology.nasa.gov.

1. Soil Remediation with Plant-Fungal Combinations

Ahh, fungus. It’s fun to say and fun to eat—if you are a mushroom fan. But, did you know it can play a crucial role in helping trees grow in contaminated soil? Scientists at our Ames Research Center discovered that a special type of the fungus among us called “Ectomycorrhizal” (or EM for short) can help enhance the growth of trees in areas that have been damaged, such as those from oil spills.

2. Preliminary Research Aerodynamic Design to Lower Drag

When it comes to aircraft, drag can be, well…a drag. Luckily, innovators at our Armstrong Flight Research Center are experimenting with a new wing design that removes adverse yaw (or unwanted twisting) and dramatically increases aircraft efficiency by reducing drag. Known as the “Preliminary Research Aerodynamic Design to Lower Drag (PRANDTL-D)” wing, this design addresses integrated bending moments and lift to achieve drag reduction.

3. Advancements in Nanomaterials

What do aircraft, batteries, and furniture have in common? They can ALL be improved with our nanomaterials.  Nanomaterials are very tiny materials that often have unique optical, electrical and mechanical properties. Innovators at NASA’s Glenn Research Center have developed a suite of materials and methods to optimize the performance of nanomaterials by making them tougher and easier to process. This useful stuff can also help electronics, fuel cells and textiles.

4. Green Precision Cleaning

Industrial cleaning is hard work. It can also be expensive when you have to bring in chemicals to get things squeaky. Enter “Green Precision Cleaning,” which uses the nitrogen bubbles in water instead. The bubbles act as a scrubbing agent to clean equipment. Goddard Space Flight Center scientists developed this system for cleaning tubing and piping that significantly reduces cost and carbon consumption. Deionized water (or water that has been treated to remove most of its mineral ions) takes the place of costlier isopropyl alcohol (IPA) and also leaves no waste, which cuts out the pricey process of disposal. The cleaning system quickly and precisely removes all foreign matter from tubing and piping.

5. Self-Contained Device to Isolate Biological Samples

When it comes to working in space, smaller is always better. Innovators at our Johnson Space Center have developed a self-contained device for isolating microscopic materials like DNA, RNA, proteins, and cells without using pipettes or centrifuges. Think of this technology like a small briefcase full of what you need to isolate genetic material from organisms and microorganisms for analysis away from the lab. The device is also leak-proof, so users are protected from chemical hazards—which is good news for astronauts and Earth-bound scientists alike.

6. Portable, Rapid, Quiet Drill

When it comes to “bringing the boom,” NASA does it better than anyone. But sometimes, we know it’s better to keep the decibels low.
That’s why innovators at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory have developed a new handheld drilling device, suitable for a variety of operations, that is portable, rapid and quiet. Noise from drilling operations often becomes problematic because of the location or time of operations. Nighttime drilling can be particularly bothersome and the use of hearing protection in the high-noise areas may be difficult in some instances due to space restrictions or local hazards. This drill also weighs less than five pounds – talk about portable power.  

7. Damage Detection System for Flat Surfaces

The ability to detect damage to surfaces can be crucial, especially on a sealed environment that sustains human life or critical equipment. Enter Kennedy Space Center’s damage detection system for flat composite surfaces.
The system is made up of layered composite material, with some of those layers containing the detection system imbedded right in.
Besides one day potentially keeping humans safe on Mars, this tech can also be used on aircrafts, military shelters, inflatable structures and more.

8. Sucrose-Treated Carbon Nanotube and Graphene Yarns and Sheets

We all know what a spoonful of sugar is capable of. But, who knew it could help make some materials stronger? Innovators at NASA’s Langley Research Center did! They use dehydrated sucrose to create yarns and woven sheets of carbon nanotubes and graphene.

The resulting materials are lightweight and strong. Sucrose is inexpensive and readily available, making the process cost-effective. Makes you look at the sweet substance a little differently, doesn’t it?

9. Ultrasonic Stir Welding

NASA scientists needed to find a way to friction weld that would be gentler on their welding equipment. Meet our next tech, ultrasonic stir welding.

NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center engineers developed ultrasonic stir welding to join large pieces of very high-strength, high-melting-temperature metals such as titanium and Inconel. The addition of ultrasonic energy reduces damaging forces to the stir rod (or the piece of the unit that vibrates so fast, it joins the welding material together), extending its life. The technology also leaves behind a smoother, higher-quality weld.

10. A Field Deployable PiezoElectric Gravimeter (PEG)

It’s important to know that the fuel pumping into rockets has remained fully liquid or if a harmful chemical is leaking out of its container. But each of those things, and the many other places sensors are routinely used, tends to require a specially designed, one-use device.

That can result in time-consuming and costly cycles of design, test and build, since there is no real standardized sensor that can be adapted and used more widely.

To meet this need, the PiezoElectric Gravimeter (PEG) was developed to provide a sensing system and method that can serve as the foundation for a wide variety of sensing applications.

See anything your business could use? Did anything inspire you to start your own company? If so, head to our website at technology.nasa.gov to check them out.

When you’ve found what you need, click, “Apply Now!” Our licensing system, ATLAS, will guide you through the rest.

If the items on this round-up didn’t grab you, that’s ok, too. We have hundreds of other technologies available and ready to license on our website.

And if you want to learn more about the technologies already being used all around you, visit spinoff.nasa.gov.

Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space: http://nasa.tumblr.com

You can’t ask for more LGBT / mentally ill / disabled / POC representation in media if you don’t believe that fiction affects reality. That’s complete bullshit.

Fiction has always affected reality. Popular media has influenced generations of people & always gives us insight to common attitudes and beliefs in the past.

If fiction doesn’t affect reality, why are so many black cats killed or left unadopted. Why did two girls try and kill their friend because of Slenderman. Why do so many young girls think they can become astronauts, scientists, or even the president after they watch TV shows with women in high positions of power. Why are sharks feared more than they ever have been after the movie Jaws. Why do North Korean citizens who obtain smuggled contraband videos and flashdrives full of American shows and movies become motivated to leave their country. Why do so many serial killers have similar tastes in favorite books and movies. Why did so many young girls braid their hair after Disney’s Frozen or The Hunger Games came out. Why was it reported that kids who grew up reading Harry Potter became adults more tolerant and accepting of people from different cultures.

You learn shit from media. That’s the goddamn truth. It’s why kids shows are so vastly different from adults’ ones–you learn morality and ethics from others. You learn how to act and behave, and what’s right or wrong. What content you consume shapes you as a person.

Fiction. Affects. Reality.

NASA just graduated its newest class of astronauts. Out of the over 18,300 applicants from all around the United States, the District of Columbia, Guam, American Samoa, and Puerto Rico, there are the 12 who were selected. For those doing the math, that puts the odds of being selected at less than 1 in 1,500. 2017’s class is full of incredibly talented people with backgrounds ranging from engineering, the Navy, the Marines, to geoscience. One of the most exciting parts? Roughly half of them are women!

Jessica Watkins may be a new astronaut, but she isn’t new to space exploration. Already exploring Mars as part of the JPL team that operates the Curiosity rover, the Stanford graduate enjoys a rich life outside of work. With a Ph.D. from UCLA and a postdoctorate from Caltech working to discover Mars’ geological history, Watkins also writes short stories, flies planes, and plays rugby.

All these “humans are the weird ones” posts always assume humans are the everyman, and talk in slang and colloquialisms, while the aliens in these posts, for some reason, always talk in scientific terms and technobabble. Why? I mean, why would human scientists and astronauts suddenly stop talking in scientific terms, or the other way, why would aliens talk in these scientific terms in situations where humans use colloquial, or simple language? Why not the other way round?

“Excuse me, crewman Qlurx?”

“Yes, crewman Smith?”

“The electron microscope is broken. Do you know who can fix it?”

“I’m sorry, the what?”

“The…electron microscope. You know, the white machine in the lab that we use to examine organic specimens?”

“…or-ga-…”

“…the plants and mushrooms.”

“Ooooooh, you mean the ‘Look At Small Things Machine’! Sure, I’ll send a thing repairer over to look at it.”

“…okay. Good thing that’s settled then. I was afraid there was a problem with your xenotranslation module.”

“My…”

“…ear talking thing.”