astrochelys

All a visual does in a kpop group is stand there and look pretty, they provide nothing.

THAT’S LITERALLY NO- ok they do look very handsome/beautiful BUT SO DO THE OTHER BOYS/GIRLS IN THE GROUP. 

ALL OF THE VISUALS IN A GROUP HAVE TALENT NO MATTER WHAT. WETHER IT BE SINGING, RAPPING, DANCING, AND ETC. THEY ARE NOT JUST OBJECTS AND THEY ARE SUCH CUTIES, I CAN’T. (gifs are obviously not mine)

VISUALS/ FACE OF THE GROUP ARE TWO DIFFERENT THINGS (look it up) THIS POST IS IN NO PARTICULAR ORDER. IF THE GROUP HAS MULTIPLE VISUALS ADD HIM/HER, I’M GOING BY RANDOM. IF YOUR FAVES AREN’T UP HERE, ADD THEM!!! (I’m tired of people saying I forgot someone WHEN I LITERALLY TOLD YOU TO ADD THEM, IT ISN’T HARD. thanks :)

Kim Seokjin (Jin) BTS

Originally posted by openlyselfish

Moon Byulyi (Moonbyul) MAMAMOO

Originally posted by moongayi

Shin Jiho (Xero) Topp Dogg

Originally posted by yuusangdo

Kim Mingyu (Mingyu) Seventeen

Originally posted by moncheriwonwoo

Kim Jisoo (Jisoo) Blackpink

Originally posted by yooyoung

Kim Sojung (Sowon) Gfriend

Originally posted by amberlpreston

Lee Hongbin (Hongbin) VIXX

Originally posted by hakyeon-etc

Kim Himchan (Himchan) B.A.P

Originally posted by stanbap

Kim Jinwoo (Jinwoo) Winner

Originally posted by jinfinitely

Park Seungjun (Seungjun) KNK

Originally posted by twikeun

Kim Minhwi (Minsung) Romeo

Originally posted by multifankpop

Krystal Jung (Krystal) F(x)

Originally posted by deathbyjung

Choi Minho (Minho) SHINee

Originally posted by dayumonew

Lee Dongmin (Cha Eunwoo) ASTRO

Originally posted by astroyals

Chou Tzuyu (Tzuyu) Twice

Originally posted by gayish-twice-trash

Koo Junhoe (Ju-Ne) or Song Yoonhyung (Yunhyeong) iKon (Different websites say different things so here’s both cuties)

Originally posted by 1junhoe

Originally posted by ygboys-ot11

Kim Seokwoo (Rowoon) SF9

Originally posted by softseong

Ahn Jaehyo (Jaehyo) Block B

Originally posted by jaehyohoe

Kim Wonpil (Wonpil) Day6

Originally posted by jaetime

Jeon Somin (Somin) K.A.R.D

Originally posted by wahsabi

The leader of a kpop group must…

The rapper(s) of a kpop group must…

The vocalist(s) of a kpop group must…

The maknae of a kpop group must…

VISUALS/ FACE OF THE GROUP ARE TWO DIFFERENT THINGS (look it up) THIS POST IS IN NO PARTICULAR ORDER. IF THE GROUP HAS MULTIPLE VISUALS ADD HIM/HER, I’M GOING BY RANDOM. IF YOUR FAVES AREN’T UP HERE, ADD THEM!!! (I’m tired of people saying I forgot someone WHEN I LITERALLY TOLD YOU TO ADD THEM, IT ISN’T HARD. thanks :) ADD MORE!

uromastyxornata  asked:

Hello! I'm doing my senior project on breeding reptiles and wondered if you could answer a question to help me on it. What's your view on how breeding reptiles helps or hurts conservation? Just reptiles in general, not morph breeding though if you want to get into that it would help me have a side against it in my report. Thank you for your time!

Alright, let’s get one thing out of the way: nothing you do as a private reptile keeper has any possible benefit for wild animals except stopping more from being extracted from the wild. The exception being those individuals who set up institution-recognised, carefully managed breeding centres using private funding in their own private space without commercialising it. But 99.999% of herp keepers and breeders are not in that camp.

The trouble is, the majority of breeders are producing inbred offspring (either through negligence or on purpose for the creation of morphs) and are not tracking their blood lines through studbooks. A lot of the breeding is also done at a diffuse level - numerous individuals exchanging animals across the country or the world - and in these cases the record-keeping is even worse. Without a studbook or records of bloodlines, it is easy to wind up with genetically inviable populations and smaller than expected effective population sizes. The result is that any potential re-introduction might suffer from serious inbreeding depression, and result in a collapse of the reintroduced population.

When animals are initially imported into the pet trade, exact locations are often ignored. This can be a serious problem in cases where the taxonomy of a given species is not entirely clear, even when studbooks are relatively meticulously kept. For instance, the entire population of Uroplatus ebenaui in captivity is completely invalid from a conservation perspective, because the origins of the animals coming out of the wild have not been traced, and we now know that U. ebenaui is in fact nine species which are probably able to interbreed in captivity. Without keeping track of where the imports came from the existing population is worthless, and only record-keeping from here on in will be in any way meaningful for the conservation of these nine different evolutionary lineages.

Axolotls are another really good example. The axolotl is Critically Endangered and nearing extinction in the wild. It is easy to shrug this off as not being a big deal because there are so many axolotl in captivity that the idea that they might soon be extinct altogether is ludicrous. The trouble is, the animals in captivity (except those maintained in research institutions, breeding facilities, and zoos) are completely inviable for the re-establishment of the wild axolotl. Many have been crossed with the Tiger Salamander to create the albino axolotl morph, and of course hybrids are useless for conservation, and the rest have not had their bloodlines carefully traced. So while you might argue that the axolotl is going to survive, the loss of the wild axolotls may prove irreversible. Certainly pet owners and breeders are not going to be involved in its recovery.

I have come across a lot of people online claiming that they are somehow helping the conservation of species by keeping and breeding them in captivity, and selling the offspring. Almost 100% of the time this is bullshit. As I’ve said, yes, it is good for the wild animals to be producing captive-bred individuals to remove pet-industry pressure of collection from the wild. However, we must remember that pet-industry collection as a threat to the survival of most species is faaar down the list of threats to a species. That is, until the species is Critically Endangered. For example, the ploughshare tortoise (Astrochelys yniphora) from Madagascar is now Critically Endangered. Somewhere between 300 and 600 individuals exist in the wild. The initial population decline was not because of the pet trade, but rather due to loss of habitat, introduced livestock, and especially consumption as food. Now, however, the major threat really is the pet trade: rich individuals from Eastern Asia and the US are funding the black market collection and export of this species, and as much as 20% of the known population has been found in a suitcase bound for the back yards of rich assholes who think their own desire to own one of these precious animals is more important than the survival of the whole species.

I would be reluctant to say that breeding animals in captivity necessarily harms conservation efforts. Certainly it is not as beneficial as the average keeper might like to think it is, but as long as the animals being bred in captivity are not escaping and/or interbreeding with wild populations, it can’t be particularly damaging to conservation efforts, except that perhaps people don’t realise just how threatened axolotls are.

A Tortoise Guardian with one of the few remaining Ploughshare Tortoises (Astrochelys yniphora) in Madagascar. Local villagers are hired as Para-rangers to help protect wild Ploughshare populations. The Turtle Conservancy works diligently with our global partners to stop the poaching and illegal trade of this Critically Endangered species.

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Members of the TC team are currently in Antananarivo, Madagascar where 400 Critically Endangered juvenile Radiated Tortoises (Astrochelys radiata) were confiscated at the airport last week. Another 900 were confiscated in southern Madagascar yesterday. The trade continues almost unabated with many many thousands of smuggled tortoises flowing though Madagascar’s porous airports heading to asian markets annually.

Coveted for their striking patterns, Critically Endangered Radiated Tortoises (Astrochelys radiata) are common victims of the escalating illegal wildlife trade.

New Hatchlings!

The Turtle Conservancy has had some exciting new hatchlings during the month of October!


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We hatched five more Critically Endangered Golden Coin Turtles (Cuora trifasciata) as part of our ongoing participation in the reintroduction program run by Kadoorie Farm and Botanic Garden in Hong Kong and the Agriculture, Fisheries, and Conservation Department of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region Government. This lovable turtle is prized in “traditional” Chinese medicine for its purported health benefits; recently it was proclaimed by turtle farmers to provide a cure for cancer. Local farmers are slowly becoming poachers of this species because for the price of one turtle, they can buy a house!

The Turtle Conservancy joined the Golden Coin Turtle conservation effort in January of 2013 when we executed the first-ever repatriation of captive-born turtles for a reintroduction program. Today we have now produced 26 offspring of this rare species at our conservation breeding center and are continuing to repatriate them for eventual reintroduction into a highly protected area of their natural habitat in Hong Kong.


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We hatched one more Endangered Forsten’s Tortoise (Indotestudo forstenii). We know very little about the wild populations of this incredible tortoise. It is endemic to Sulawesi, Indonesia, where it is restricted to the northern arm of the island and is collected for local consumption and the pet trade. The Turtle Conservancy traveled to Indonesia to study this species in June of 2012. The TC’s Christine Light is the North American studbook keeper for this species, and we are looking into future fieldwork opportunities to better understand this tortoise.


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We hatched one Critically Endangered Radiated Tortoise (Astrochelys radiata). This striking tortoise is endemic to Madagascar and is found on the southern tip of the island. Heavy collection for local consumption and the pet trade is driving this tortoise to the brink of extinction.


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We hatched one Critically Endangered Pancake Tortoise (Malacochersus tornieri). The carapace of this remarkable species is flattened, hence its name. It is commonly found squeezed in rock crevices in Tanzania and Kenya. Collection for the pet trade is destroying wild populations of this tortoise.