associates in arts

something that people really dont understand about ADHD is that we dont “jump from one idea to the next”

we have very fast, very associative minds that connect ideas. we have a train of thought, it just goes WAY faster than yours!

example: im thinking about dogs. that makes me think of pitbulls, which makes me think of an animal planet show i enjoy. the show connects to tv in general, which makes me think of my favorite cartoon. i associate my favorite cartoon with art and animation, and i wind up thinking about shading techniques.


TL;DR: having ADHD is kinda like playing a lifelong game of 7 Degrees of Kevin Bacon

4

and this is the wonder that’s keeping the stars apart

2

i feel like i owe the Foxes at least one group drawing considering i read all the books in like 3 days…

To the boy with the universe in his cape and whose eyes shine brighter than the stars. It’s our dear starry price! ☆

To the boy who also doesn’t wear matching socks, but they have stars so it’s cool// Based off the DLC chat! 

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John Alvin’s poster concepts for Disney’s Beauty and the Beast (1991).

John Alvin is the artist behind the iconic movie posters for such Disney classics as The Little Mermaid, Beauty and the Beast, Aladdin, The Lion King and The Hunchback of Notre Dame. In addition to his work in animation, Alvin also did posters for live-action films like E.T., Blade Runner and Jurassic Park.

Alvin’s wife, Andrea, has released a GORGEOUS book highlighting her husband’s many illustrated accomplishments – The Art of John Alvin. As Mrs. Alvin frequently assisted her husband with his work, she also has a lot of fascinating back-stories about the paintings. Reprinted below is her account of the creation of the poster for Disney’s Beauty and the Beast:

“There were many concept sketches done of the two main characters in various settings and poses, both by the staff at Disney and by John. John’s method of working on this aspect of a job was to do very rough thumbnails of various ideas. From that point he would do a larger sketch, around 8.5 x 11 inches, with more attention to detail and composition. He would then move on to color sketches and color comps.

“John did not do too many small color comps on this film. Instead, he did several medium size paintings as color comps and at least two paintings that would be considered finishes. One was the couple dancing in front of a stained glass window featuring a rose, and the other was an image of the couple bathed in an ethereal light. The second was the image used on the one-sheet.

“The poster was done before the film was complete and the characters were not completely finalized when John started painting. That was one of the reasons to have them in somewhat of a silhouette. His technique to create the mood was to begin with a dark background and bring the subjects into the light. He applied the paint with an airbrush, building his paint in transparent layers, similar to a watercolorist. Most airbrush artists use a number of elaborate friskets or masks to protect the areas they don’t want painted at that time. However, John felt that light didn’t have hard edges, and so his painting shouldn’t really have hard edges. It was a game for him to see how few friskets he could use in a piece of finished art. He was fascinated by what he called “heavy light”—the light Steven Spielberg had used in E.T. and Close Encounters of the Third Kind. That was the look he was trying to emulate in the Beauty and the Beast art.

“The final piece was a hit and John was very pleased with it. The printers had some difficulty reproducing the magentas in the art, but in the end did a beautiful job. It was the beginning of a long and successful relationship with Disney feature animation.”

Amazon Associates link: The Art of John Alvin by Andrea Alvin

Little Break 2/2   -Guide dog

Long ago, I met a person who walking with a guide dog at a certain station in Tokyo.
That person and a guide dog got on a crowded train. I could not do anything.
And it was a very hot day. I thought, The dog is sorry.
But that way of thinking is wrong.
I’m involved with a little bit volunteer, and I learned that guide dogs love their work.
Someday, I was thinking of trying to draw about guide dogs.

いつだったか、都心の駅で盲導犬を連れたユーザに出会いました。ユーザと盲導犬は、満員電車に乗って行きました。盲導犬ユーザの方に、声をかけることもできなかった自分。そしてそれはとても暑い日で、私はその時思いました。犬が気の毒だということ。でもその考え方は間違っていたと思う。
私は少しボランティアで関わり、盲導犬は彼らの仕事が大好きであるということを知りました。
そして私は理解できる範囲で、いつか彼らを描いてみたいと思っていました