ask the vegan

Group Chat for Ana’s

Guys, I’m starting a group chat on kik for anyone who wants to join. Here are the rules below, and please message me your kik username and I will add you.

Btw, my username on kik is @._Cheese_.

  • Be active 😊 I will kick inactive people
  • Please don’t be mean, I will kick rude people
  • Give some good recipes to try 💚 (personally I’m vegan)
  • Ask questions if you want 😋
  • Message me your username to add you
  • Be at least 12
  • Don’t spam completely random pictures
  • You can post thinspo but please no nude pictures
  • Message me if you can’t be active for some reason 💜
  • Be nice! Let’s make some new friends and encourage people 😁😚

anonymous asked:

Is using honey bad? It would be hard for me to give that up because I love it so much.

16 oz of honey requires 1152 bees to travel 112,000 miles and visit 4.5 million flowers.

Most of the honey we get at supermarkets and stores don’t come from natural hives. 

Honey is an animal product, produced when bees digest nectar they have collected and then regurgitate it. It is an animal product, just like an egg or milk. Yes, a bee is an insect and not technically considered an animal by many people, but a bee’s body changes the composition of what it ingests, just like other animals.

However, there is another reason vegans won’t eat honey, and that is because it is harmful to another living creature. According to Daniel Hammer, bees do experience pain and suffering while they are being exploited for their products (not just honey but also beeswax, royal jelly, and more). There is simply no way beekeepers, humane or otherwise, can avoid harming or killing bees while they are extracting the bees’ products. Many vegans choose their lifestyle because they wish to avoid harming any other creature, and so they choose not to eat honey.

Check out this couple of articles that are pretty complete about everything around this topic :) 

hey? friendly reminder that it’s better to go 90%, 80%, or even like 50% vegan than to not try at all? (besides, no one can be truly 100% vegan, and we know that)

i’d infinitely rather talk to a vegetarian who has attempted going vegan, than a carnist who has never done any self reflection in their lifetime

pretty much all vegans will acknowledge that not everyone can go all or even most of the way vegan, but reducing some harm is better than turning a blind eye and not even trying

fruitkink  asked:

hey i was wondering how you feel about zoos and aquariums? ive been seeing a lot of people (idk if theyre vegan) trying to support them by saying theyre non profit, accredited animal rehabilitation centers, & that makes them okay? i have a problem with this cos most zoos i know definitely arent for that purpose, they just seem to cage animals up&like ones with zoos r killing polar bears cos its not their natural habitat, & i know many actual rehabilitation centers tht never call themselves a zoo

Hi there fruitkink! 🐙

I totally agree with you on that, Zoos are businesses! Sanctuaries, Natural Reserves, National Parks and such are truly for conservation and nature’s well-being. 

How did I lose the weight?

I really hate to be redundant, because I’m sure you’ve been told this plenty of times already, (and so have I), but it is the actual answer: eat healthier foods and smaller portions, and exercise HARD at least 3-4 times a week. 

I think it is especially important to add heavy lifting training into your fitness regime because it will shape your body better than an all cardio schedule. Also, muscle burns more calories even while resting so the more muscle you have, the faster you will see change! I heavy lift at least 3 times a week now, and that jump started my weight loss. Cardio is still done, but I do less endurance cardio (just running for a long time at a normal pace), and more high intensity cardio. For example, I will do short sprints at my fastest pace for 1/8 of a mile, then walk the rest of the lap. Then I will repeat this until I’ve finished one mile, usually. It is healthier for your heart to learn how to beat faster and then cool down faster, too. This will actually reduce your resting BPM, which is very healthy for your heart! 

I also take pro-biotics daily now, and it has helped my stomach immensely and therefore helped my metabolism. That coupled with a daily multi-vitamin and LOTS of water has helped my body and mind feel better in general. I drink a lot of coffee, too, so I have to remember to drink DOUBLE the water for each coffee. So many bathroom breaks. So worth it. 

I started using the app/website MyFitnessPal to track my intake and my output! I have a 67 day streak going on right now for logging my meals and my exercise. I find that app extremely helpful because it is encouraging and it tells you if you are eating enough/too little, not just if you are eating too much. It really is a good app for your health, and I think it has a good social community too that keeps me motivated! Before using MFP, I never thought too much about what I was putting into my body and my workouts were not as regimented. This made it harder for me to lose weight in a pleasing pattern. Now the scale goes down about 1 pound each week. That is a super healthy pattern of weight loss because it is not too fast. 

However, I do not want to just lose weight! When I reach my desired weight, a healthy BMI, I wish to gain a little back in muscle. More muscle = MORE FOOD. And I sure do love food. 

I hope this helps! Any other questions more specifically aimed at my diet and exercise, please feel free to ask me! 

Here’s How to Eat Vegan for a Week For Under $50

Some of the most affordable foods on the planet are vegan, including rice, beans, legumes, pasta, and all kinds of fruits and veggies. Despite this, people will often ask us about eating vegan on a budget.

So we’ve compiled some handy tips and tricks that will keep you veg without breaking the bank:

Dry beans are worth the wait.
Sure, you have to soak them overnight, but dry beans are exponentially cheaper than canned. They’re also a delicious, protein-packed essential in a budget-friendly vegan diet.

Buy it frozen.
One great way to save money is to reduce food waste. Frozen veggies like corn, peas, and green beans are great because they last almost forever.

Get into oatmeal.
Yeah, oatmeal is a super secret vegan hack. It’s filling, loaded with iron and calcium, and one of the cheapest things you could eat for breakfast.

Stick with produce under $2 per pound.
When choosing fresh fruits and veggies, try to stick with items under $2/lb.

If you want to splurge, buy some Vegenaise.
Of course you can just use it like mayo, but you can also create sour cream (just add lemon juice), salad dressings, and sauces with this must-have specialty item.

Soup is a thing.
Soups loaded with veggies, grains, and beans hold well as leftovers, stretch your dollars, and make great filling meals!

Stick with staples.
Rice, pasta, and peanut butter are all great choices for affordability and versatility.

Every night can be taco night.
Put those tasty veggies and beans to use inside a toasted tortilla! Add some Vegenaise sour cream and you’ve got yourself a tasty and inexpensive vegan dinner.

anonymous asked:

Veganism is a rich people diet

Right yeah, that must be why an estimated 4 billion live primarily on a plant-based diet, That must also be why most people in poverty throughout the world subsist on a  primarily vegetarian diet, and why across the Chinese-Japanese, Australian, Hindustani, Central Asian, Near Eastern, Mediterranean, European-Siberian, South American,  North American, Central American and Mexican regions, every single staple food is vegan.

Despite what McDonald’s might tell you, meat is a luxury. The only reason it isn’t seen as a luxury in the western world is because we heavily subsidise it with taxpayer’s money. A full 63% of all food subsidies go to meat and dairy, compared to <1% towards fruits and vegetables. 62% of your average American farmer’s earnings come from the United States government, meaning that people pay for less than half of the real terms cost of their meat. If full ecological costs -including fossil fuel use, groundwater depletion and agricultural-chemical pollution were factored in the price of meat would double or triple. The rest is paid for in tax dollars, and this is the case in most western countries. You can dismiss veganism as “a rich person diet” all you want, but it is the very definition of privilege to expect someone else to pick up the tab for your meal.

Stop erasing poor vegans and using us as pawns in your poorly thought out, knee-jerk reaction, anti-vegan bullshit. It isn’t cute, it isn’t funny, we do exist and we’re sick to death of people like you pretending that we don’t. If you don’t want to be vegan then I can’t make you, but at least have the integrity to not throw thousands of poor people under the bus just to make yourself feel better about it.

anonymous asked:

vegans have to stop acting like someone eating meat is whats really causing climate change. most fossil fuels come from corporations, rarely this is due to individual households themselves. the myth that climate change can be reduced if every individual cuts back is false. even if every house turned off their lights more, reduced fires in their backyards, etc you still have corporations committing over 70% of the cause of climate change.

First, I would like to know where you got your information because typically our changing planet is not measured in climate change, but rather deforestation, rising temperatures, shifting snow and rainfall patterns, number of ocean dead zones, extreme climate events, and specie extension. Climate change is the term for the whole shabang. 

More and more studies are showing that the consumption of animal products is the largest contributor to serious environmental issues that we are facing. 

  •     91% of deforestation in the Amazon rainforest is due to animal agriculture. (https://www.pachamama.org/blog/how-animal-agriculture-affects-our-planet)
  •     51% of global greenhouse gas emissions are due to livestock production. (This number takes into account the gasses livestock produce on their own, like carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, hydrofluorocarbons, perfluorocarbons, and sulphur hexafluoride.) http://www.worldwatch.org/files/pdf/Livestock%20and%20Climate%20Change.pdf
  •    According to the same World Watch Institute, animal agriculture is       responsible for 32 billion tons of carbon dioxide a year.
  •  According to the U.S Department of Agriculture (USDA), Factory farms produce 500 million tons of untreated manure annually. (3 times the amount of sewage produced by humans in the United States.)
  •  The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has blamed current factory farming practices for 70% of the pollution in the nation’s rivers and streams.
  • The water pollution affects marine wildlife as well and there are now 500 reported “dead zones” around the world that have collapsed due to animal agricultural chemical runoff and waste.

Sadly, this list goes on.

Yes, in today’s world it seems unlikely that we, as individuals can ever even hope to make an impact. But actually, it’s more imperative then ever. WE are the consumers which means WE have the power to change an industry.

All movements that demand change start with individuals.

pretty-love-ly  asked:

Isn't supporting bee keepers by buying honey kind of a good thing? Like its a double edged sword bc we shouldn't use animals as food and all but right now with the changing climate and GMO crops and colony collapse disorder it's killing off bees and we desperately need them, so isn't it a good thing that bee keepers are keeping bees alive?

Hi there pretty-love-ly!

We’ve been tricked into believing that honey is simply a byproduct of the essential pollination provided by farmed honeybees. Did you know though that the honeybee’s wild counterparts (such as bumblebees, carpenter and digger bees) are much better pollinators? They are also less likely than farmed honeybees to be affected by mites and Africanized bees. The issue is that these native bees can hibernate for up to 11 months out of the year and do not live in large colonies. Thus, they do not produce massive amounts of honey for a  $157 million dollar a year industry.

Honey and the Different Types of Bees

Honey bees: Honey bees make a large quantity of honey (possible due to the size of colonies – that is, many worker bees collecting nectar). Honey consists of nectar combined with a ‘bee enzyme’ that goes through a process of concentration in the honeycomb before it is capped by the bees.

Bumblebees: Bumblebees, in one sense, make a form of honey, which they collect in nectar pots to be eaten by the colony, including the newly hatched worker females. However, the process of concentrating, capping, and the making of honey combs does not happen in bumblebee colonies, nor is nectar stored over winter, since only the queen survives and hibernates, whilst the rest of the colony do not.

Solitary bees: Solitary bees do not make honeycombs. They construct egg cells which they provision with a ball of nectar and pollen that will be consumed by the new larvae.

Honey bees will pollinate many plant species that are not native to their natural habitat but are often inefficient pollinators of such plants.

The crops that can be only pollinated by honey bees are:

• Guar Bean
• Quince
• Lemon
• Lime
• Karite
• Tamarind

The crops that are pollinated by bees, in general, are:

• Apples
• Mangos
• Rambutan
• Kiwi Fruit
• Plums
• Peaches
• Nectarines
• Guava
• Rose Hips
• Pomegranites
• Pears
• Black and Red Currants
• Alfalfa
• Okra
• Strawberries
• Onions
• Cashews
• Cactus
• Prickly Pear
• Apricots
• Allspice
• Avocados
• Passion Fruit
• Lima Beans
• Kidney Beans
• Adzuki Beans
• Green Beans
• Orchid Plants
• Custard Apples
• Cherries
• Celery
• Coffee
• Walnut
• Cotton
• Lychee
• Flax
• Acerola – used in Vitamin C supplements
• Macadamia Nuts
• Sunflower Oil
• Goa beans
• Lemons
• Buckwheat
• Figs
• Fennel
• Limes
• Quince
• Carrots
• Persimmons
• Palm Oil
• Loquat
• Durian
• Cucumber
• Hazelnut
• Cantaloupe
• Tangelos
• Coriander
• Caraway
• Chestnut
• Watermelon
• Star Apples
• Coconut
• Tangerines
• Boysenberries
• Starfruit
• Brazil Nuts
• Beets
• Mustard Seed
• Rapeseed
• Broccoli
• Cauliflower
• Cabbage
• Brussels Sprouts
• Bok Choy (Chinese Cabbage)
• Turnips
• Congo Beans
• Sword beans
• Chili peppers, red peppers, bell peppers, green peppers
• Papaya
• Safflower
• Sesame
• Eggplant
• Raspberries
• Elderberries
• Blackberries
• Clover
• Tamarind
• Cocoa
• Black Eyed Peas
• Vanilla
• Cranberries
• Tomatoes
• Grapes

Check this chart to see which type of bees can pollinate those crops.

While you may spread a heaping tablespoon of honey on your morning toast without thinking, creating each drop is no small feat. To make one pound of honey, a colony must visit over two million flowers, flying over 55,000 miles, at up to 15 miles per hour to do so. During a bee’s lifetime, she will only make approximately one teaspoon of honey, which is essential to the hive for times when nectar is scarce, such as during winter. At times, there may be an excess in the hive, but this amount is difficult to determine and large-scale beekeepers often remove all or most of it and replace it with a sugar or corn syrup substitute. Can you imagine someone removing all the fruit juice from your house and replacing it with fruit-flavored soda? It may still give you energy, but eventually, it will probably make you sick.

BEES DIE FOR YOUR HONEY

Another thing to think about while you sit by your beeswax candle and contemplate the lives of these little fellows is that bees must consume approximately eight pounds of honey to produce each pound of wax! And the more we take from them (bee pollen, royal jelly, propolis) the harder these creatures must work and the more bees are needed, which isn’t good news for a population that is dwindling.

When you see a jar of honey, you may think of the sweet cartoon hives depicted in childhood stories such as Winnie the Pooh. But most hives are now confined to large boxes (a completely foreign shape to bees) that are jostled and shipped around the country to pollinate crops and produce honey. This is stressful and confusing to the bees’ natural navigation systems. Along the way, bees are lost and killed, and may spread diseases from one infected hive to another. The practice of bee farming often limits the bees’ diet to monoculture crops, introduces large amounts of pesticides into their systems and causes the farmed bees to crowd out the native wild pollinators that may have been otherwise present. Beekeepers (even small-scale backyard beekeepers) will also kill the queens if they feel the hive is in danger of swarming (fleeing their file cabinet shaped homes) or drones* that they deem unnecessary to honey production. * The drones’ main function is to fertilize the queen when needed.

We have got to the point where we mass exploit honeybees as pollinators to fix a problem that should be fixed from the roots and not partially.

“At certain times of the year, three or four trucks carrying beehives rumble along Highway 20 every week. Their destination: California, where the bees are required for pollination services. During my time in California researching dairy farms, I learned about an extraordinary consequence of intensive farming taken to extremes: industrialized pollination - a business that is rapidly expanding as the natural bee population collapses. In certain parts of the world, as a result of industrial farming, there are no longer enough bees to pollinate the crops. Farmers are forced to hire or rent them in”
— Farmagedon. The True Cost of Cheap Meat

The Case of the Disappearing Bees

The question of what will happen if bees disappear may not be far from being answered. Over the past couple of years, stories about bees disappearing and Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) have been popping up in the The New York Times, Star Tribune, Huffington Post, PBS, Discovery News and more. If nothing else wakes us up, perhaps the fact that the disappearance of bees has become front page news will. Scientists are rushing to discover what’s causing this problem before it’s too late and before we lose the important environmental link created by bees.

Thus far, there are three main theories/contributing factors:

  • Pesticides

Pennsylvania State University published a study in 2010 that found “unprecedented levels” of pesticides in honeybees and hives in the United States. (If it’s in the bees and hives, what do you think is in your honey?) Some of these chemicals are killing bees, and guess what? The EPA knows about it.

“The EPA identifies two specific neonicotinoids, imidacloprid and clothianidin, as highly toxic to bees. Both chemicals cause symptoms in bees such as memory loss, navigation disruption, paralysis, and death.

Both chemicals have been linked to dramatic honeybee deaths and subsequent suspensions of their use in France and Germany. Several European countries have already suspended them. Last year Slovenia and Italy also suspended their use for what they consider a significant risk to honeybee populations.”

– Mother Earth News

This is old news; this story came out in 2009. But has anything changed here? Not as far as I can tell.

  • Mites and Viruses

With weakened immune systems (stress, inferior food sources, pesticides etc.) bees have become more susceptible to viruses, fungal infections, and mites. Many of these invasive bugs are spread as hives are moved around the country or transferred from country to country.

While there are a number of treatments on the market for the mites, viruses, fungus and other pests that are attacking our colonies, none have solved the problem completely. These treatments can also introduce antibiotics, pesticides and other chemicals into the hives in an attempt to prevent or heal the infection. If these chemicals (often on strips) are not removed from the hive after they lose potency, they can, in fact, help the viruses or mites become resistant to treatment in the future.

  • Cell phones

This is one of the newest theories on CCD and may need further testing.

“According to a Swiss researcher who recently published a paper on the subject, the electromagnetic waves from mobile phones have a significant impact on the behavior of honeybees and could potentially be harming honeybees around the world.”

“To test the relationship between honeybees and buzzing cell phones, he placed phones inside bee hives and then monitored the bees’ reaction. He found that in the presence of actively communicating cellphones (those not in standby mode), bees produced the sounds known as “worker piping,” which tends to indicate disturbance in a bee colony.”

– ABC News

Cell phones, pesticides and viruses aside, commercial bee farming – whether organic (where bee deaths are fewer, but still occur) or conventional – does not provide bees with the opportunity to live out their normal life cycle. No matter how small the animal, farming is farming. Whether you choose to buy backyard honey or a large brand, eating honey and using other bee products encourages using bees for profit.

If you truly want to save bees as a whole and not only honey bees because is much more convenient.. then support bee sanctuaries, boycott the agribusiness and its use of chemicals everywhere. Here I leave some ideas and ways to help bees.

  • Sanctuaries
  1. Spikenard Farm  Honeybee Sanctuary | • Virginia, USA •
  2. New York Bee Sanctuary | • New York, USA •
  3. Native Bee Sanctuary | • Australia •
  4. Artemis Smiles - Honey Bee Sanctuary | • Hawaii, USA •
  5. Urban Evergreen Bee Sanctuary | • Washington, USA •
  6. The Honeybee Helpers | • North West, Ireland •
  7. Bee Sanctuary - The Bee School | • North Carolina, USA •
  8. Bellingen Bee Sanctuary | • Australia •
  9. Morgan Freeman Converted His 124 Acre Ranch Into A Bee Sanctuary To Help Save The Bees
  • Plant your garden with bee-friendly plants

In areas of the country where there are few agricultural crops, honeybees rely upon garden flowers to ensure they have a diverse diet and to provide nectar and pollen. Encourage honeybees to visit your garden by planting single flowering plants and vegetables. Go for all the allium family, all the mints, all beans except French beans and flowering herbs. Bees like daisy-shaped flowers - asters and sunflowers, also tall plants like hollyhocks, larkspur and foxgloves. Bees need a lot of pollen and trees are a good source of food. Willows and lime trees are exceptionally good.

  • Encourage local authorities to use bee-friendly plants in public spaces

Some of the country’s best gardens and open spaces are managed by local authorities. Recently these authorities have recognised the value of planning gardens, roundabouts and other areas with flowers that attract bees. Encourage your authority to improve the area you live in by adventurous planting schemes. These can often be maintained by local residents if the authority feels they do not have sufficient resources.

  • Weeds can be a good thing

Contrary to popular belief, a lawn full of clover and dandelions is not just a good thing—it’s a great thing! A haven for honeybees (and other native pollinators too). Don’t be so nervous about letting your lawn live a little. Wildflowers, many of which we might classify as weeds, are some of the most important food sources for native North American bees. If some of these are “weeds” you chose to get rid of (say you want to pull out that blackberry bush that’s taking over), let it bloom first for the bees and then before it goes to seed, pull it out or trim it back!

  • Don’t use chemicals or pesticides to treat your lawn or garden

Yes, they make your lawn look pristine and pretty, but they’re actually doing the opposite to the life in your biosphere. The chemicals and pest treatments you put on your lawn and garden can cause damage to the honeybees systems. These treatments are especially damaging if applied while the flowers are in bloom as they will get into the pollen and nectar and be taken back to the bee hive where they also get into the honey—which in turn means they can get into us. Pesticides, specifically neo-nicotinoid varieties have been one of the major culprits in Colony Collapse Disorder.

  • Bees are thirsty. Put a small basin of fresh water outside your home

You may not have known this one—but it’s easy and it’s true! If you have a lot of bees starting to come to your new garden of native plants, wildflowers, and flowering herbs, put a little water basin out (a bird bath with some stones in it for them to crawl on does a nice trick). They will appreciate it!

  • Let dandelions and clover grow in your yard.

Dandelions and clover are two of the bees’ favorite foods – they provide tons of nourishment and pollen for our pollinators to make honey and to feed their young (look at this bee frolicking in a dandelion below – like a pig in shit!) And these flowers could not be any easier to grow – all you have to do is not do anything.

I highly recommend also taking a look at this article too as honey is tested on animals, yes, as it says and the article explains honey is tested on dogs, cats, goats, rabbits, mice, rats…

As you can see, there is much more than saying “let’s help the bees by eating honey, vegans are dumb, they need to eat honey because what they eat relies on it”... We can save the bees without taking away the honey they produce, that’s a fact.

Honey is meant as a health food; a healthy food for bees. The more we interfere with their natural processes, both by relying on farmed bees as pollinators (rather than other native wild bees, insects or animals) and to feed our desires for “sweets,” the close we’re coming to agricultural disaster.

Sources

Keep reading

I find that “how do you know when someone is vegan” joke so fucking hysterical because have you ever looked at the comments section on a vegan recipe post? Or the reviews on a vegan restaurant’s website? It’s almost always composed of 80% meat eaters who feel the need to tell everyone they’re not vegan before they can even admit that they enjoyed the food.

anonymous asked:

i'm a vegan (yes, yes, found the vegan, cut the jokes) and i'm new to the solarpunk movement. i noticed that the question of our eating habits isn't discussed much (or at all) and to me, a solarpunk-future is only possible if we cut meat, dairy products and eggs out of our diets. it's probably only because i choose this lifestyle for me and it seems so obvious to me, but why no one talks about this? any thoughts or ideas about this?

I think veganism makes a lot of sense in relation to solarpunk, but I think it’s not the only reasonable approach to diet – particularly because of the social, cultural, and survival implications it can have for a lot of marginalized groups and individuals. 

I do think that it’s absolutely necessary to end industrial-scale production of animal products, and that a more heavily plant-based diet for the vast majority is the only sustainable way forward. 

There are people in solarpunk who are vegan, and who advocate veganism as part of what it means to them to be solarpunk. There are also people in the community who are critical of veganism, for its connection in some cases to efforts to suspend cultural practices of marginalized communities, or the insensitivity that some vegans have shown to people whose economic constraints or health needs complicate the matter.

Personally, I’m not vegan – I’m a weekday vegetarian – but I support vegans and veganism. I feel a bit iffy about the way that some folks treat it as a personal moral responsibility, because acting like systematic harms can be solved by lots of people just individually making extremely complex decisions perfectly is a really good way to diffuse and undermine activist energy. (It also can have some purity undertones that I think are counterproductive to ethical decisionmaking.)

But I think veganism as a movement is effective as a boycott, creating a sustained and systematic demand for alternatives to animal product dependence which over time makes those kinds of choices easier and easier for more and more people.

There has been some conversation back and forth about diet in solarpunk, but I think it’s been a while since it came up, and it’s not always super easy to find histories of thought on Tumblr. 

All that said – I hope you feel welcome, and I’m glad you’re getting into the community!