asian is a language

ID #87845

Name: Timi
Age: 19(20 in August)
Country: Slovenia

Heya, my name is Timi and I come from a small country called Slovenia. Currenty I’m in college studying Tourism(don’t really like it tho), but I have to get a degree If I wish to live abroad.

At first I may be Awkward and a bit shy but it gets better with time.

I have quite a wierd sense of humor and may be sarcartic at times.

Love to edit videos and pictures(still learning), taking photographs and doing other multimedia related stuff.

I like all kinds of music (k-pop, rock, metal, edm, hardstyle, trap, …).

Also really interested in the asian culture, martial arts and languages. I also like to play games, watch TV series, sometimes anime, read manga when I have time.

This is some of the more basic information about me. If you wish feel free to contact me.

Preferences: None really

11 questions tag

RULES

1. Always post the rules 2. Answer the questions given by the person who tagged you 3. Write 11 questions of your own 4. Tag 11 people (or however many you want)

I was tagged by sunshine @softgayangel and ty so much for this!!

1. whats ur fav song atm?

im hoe for cherry bomb, my boys r so precious, talented, handsome and this song is just SO FUCKING LIT

2. anything u want to accomplish by the end of the year?

My depression :))))))))

3. any language u want to learn?

(Every single on this planet i love languages) but the most i’d like to learn swedish n and any asian language

4.do u still get along w ur oldest childhood friend?

@19kwan my best buddie, bruh, princess, carrot, mandarynka, gurl, potato i love her so much shes my whole life. I’ve spend all my life with her and no one is so important for me like her (BUZIACZKI JAGÓDKA)

5. any movie u think everyone needs to watch?

the words (bc of one quote at the end of this movie but it just OHHH), lion king bc its fucking lion king and i’d say that batman trilogy bc it’s just fucking art 

6. what makes u smile/ laugh everytime?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kMhw5MFYU0s

7. who do u look up to?

Mainly a lot of artist, especially John Martin. I look up good people tho, it’s really hard to be truly good person

8. a shoutout to a lovely mutual u love 

@19kwan (BUDDIE BRUH PRINCESS)

@softgayangel u know how i fell bout you n how thankful im to you :<

@brokenalaska we dont talk at all but i think that u have to be really cool and i think we have a lot in common bc our blogs n posts r quite similiar (i know it sounds stupid but i really luv ur blog and u)

@95kjh u r just cutie and love my bigbang and ilu! ❤ ❤ ❤

@goddessofbaekhyun u r the freakin weird and i fucking luv u! u even dont know how your tags make me smile! ur the cutest fangirl i ever know and i hope that you’ll meet ur bbh one day❤

9. what is ur summer makeup aesthetic?

no makeup

10. the biggest pet peeve?

probably my life :’)

11. what are u looking forward to the most atm?

any band i like in my country, more will to live, more talent 


my questions: 1. what made u smile recently? / 2. What music genres r ur fav? / 3. Have u got ur fav painting? / 4. Fav actor, actress? / 5. Whats ur 3 fav bands? / 6. Do u watch any tv shows? / 7. How many and what pets u have? / 8. What do u love about yourself? / 9. What disney character do you see as yourself as? / 10. What do you want to do in the future? / 11. Say what good happened to you recently in your native language

and i’m tagging: @19kwan @brokenalaska @lovelyz1win @bipjm @gggloss @bojrk @7syub @k00kiee @caretae @giribouy @2senpai @chimnin @tidesofyouth @vviirgo @jiminsarroz @mounshine @glazen5e @goddessofbaekhyun @95kjh @miumiugirl @10jimin @mlnho @9yoong

☆ THINGS YOU CAN SEND TO YOUR IDOLS/FAVS💕

💚 MORNING TIME/ BEGINNING OF THE DAY.

굿모닝/좋은 아침 - good morning
안녕하세요 - hello
잘 잤어요? - did u sleep well?
화이팅 - fighting
힘내세요 - have strenght
오늘 기분이/컨디션 어때요? - how’s your mood/condition today?
좋은 하루 보내세요 -  have a good day
오늘도 네 곁에 있을게요 -  i’ll be by your side today as well

💙 NIGHT TIME/ THE END OF THE DAY.

굿밤/굿나잇/좋은 밤 - good night
안녕히 주무세요 - good night
잘자요 - sleep well
오늘 수고핬어요 - you’ve worked hard today
오늘 잘했어요 - you did well today
이제 자야 해요 - you should sleep now
내일 봐요 - see you tomorrow

💜 LOVING WORDS TO CHEER THEM UP.

보고싶어요 - i miss you
관찮아요? - are you okay?
사랑해요 - i love you
걱정 마세요 - don’t worry
우리 항상 네 곁에 있을게요 - we will always be by your side
역시 최고이다! - as excepted, you’re the best!
이 노래 정말 좋아요 - this song is really good
이 노래 너무 좋아해요 - i love this song very much
좋은 음악을 줘서 고마워요 - thank you for giving us good music
오늘도 예뻐요 - you’re pretty today as well
잘 들을 게요 - i will listen to it well
축하해요! - congrats!

💛 LOVE REMINDERS.

밥 먹었어요? - did u eat?
맛있게 먹어요 - eat deliciously
잘 먹어요! - eat well!
조심하세요 - please be careful
아프지마세요 - don’t get sick/hurt
감기 조심하세요 - don’t catch a cold

💖 WHEN YOU WANT TO REACT TO WHAT THEY POST (PICTURES, VIDEOS..)

예뻐요 - pretty
잘 생겼어요 - handsome
멋있어요 - cool
귀여워요 - cute
좋아요 - good!
아주 좋아요 - i like (very much)
오빠/언니 짱이에요! - oppa/unnie is the best!

⚠ i will probably add more soon..😄
correct me if u see any mistakes!

aways if u 

support whitewashing /think idols look better white washed

support fat shaming / extreme dieting / idols starving themselves

think idols owe you anything 

think you’re gonna marry an idol 

fetishize asian people/cultures/languages

support dating bans/ boycott idols when they date 

think idols HAVE to speak english / think western validation is the ultimate goal

support anti blackness in kpop / think idols saying the n word is okay

support shipping but are homophobic / don’t think idols are actually lgbt

pls unfollow me

Linguasks

1: What is your native language?
2: Have you learnt any other languages? If yes, what are they?
3: Have you ever read a book in a foreign language?
4: Did you learn any languages at school? If yes, what were they?
5: What is the prettiest language?
6: What is the ugliest language?
7: Have you ever made up your own language?
8: What languages do your parents speak?
9: If you were granted a wish that allowed you to instantly be able to speak any language, which would it be?
10: Have you ever tried to learn sign language?
11: Have you ever watched a movie with subtitles in a different language, or vice versa?
12: Choose a Scandinavian language you’d like to learn.
13. Choose a Slavic (eastern European) language you’d like to learn.
14. Choose an Asian language you’d like to learn.
15. French, Spanish, Greek - which is the best?
16. German, Dutch, Italian - which is the best?
17. Have you ever been embarrassed by a native speaker of the language you are trying to learn?
18. Name a dead language that you wish to make a come back.
19. What is your native language / homeland famous for?
20. What language is overrated?
21. What language do you think is too intimidating to learn?
22. What language should more people speak?
23. What language uses the prettiest alphabet?
24. What language uses the weirdest alphabet?
25. Try to find some foreign currency in your house. Where is it from?

serene-faerie  asked:

Hello! I just want to say that I love this blog. I'm a Tamil girl and I'm currently writing a book series about demons and half-demons. The demons in my novel are based on the legends of demons of various mythologies, and the heroine's love interest is a Japanese demon. However, I found that there are various names for demons in Japanese, like oni, youkai, akuma, etc. Which is the more appropriate term to use? (I should also add, there are both good and bad demons, and the love interest is good)

Names for Japanese Demons

Tossing to the Japanese followers! (If you are not Japanese, we ask that you please refrain from commenting.)

As an Asian American living in America, discovering Kpop made me realize that I don’t have to be white to make it big. I should feel proud of my culture and language, and not feel ashamed about it. It showed me that I’m beautiful with my tan skin, dark hair, and brown eyes. It showed me that no matter what race you are, you can achieve something big! Now learning about Exp, I’m so mad, I’m almost livid, because it’s easy for whites to enter the Kpop industry but Asian Americans struggle with entering the American pop industry Kpop allows Asians to be proud of their race, their language, and their culture.

Yes Exp has different races (the two black members disappeared before debut, and that’s so ironic because Kpop takes from Black Culture as well), they’re not Asian except for one. But the point in Kpop was to represent Asian culture, first Korean culture, now also bringing Chinese, Thai, and Japanese culture (and hopefully more Asian cultures soon). This is important because Kpop gets so much crap because the artists are Asian. In America, Asians are seen as jokes. Kpop needs to be respected for it’s Asian artists.

Now Exp marches into the Kpop industry while other rookies have or are working their asses off to debut and these guys come in here because they’re funded…and this begins white washing everything that Kpop stood for! (This happened before with other music genres)

KEEP OFF WHAT ASIANS HAVE WORKED SO HARD TO ACHIEVE IN THE WORLD, WHICH WAS SHOW THAT YOU DON’T HAVE TO BE WHITE TO MAKE IT BIG, TO MAKE INTERNATIONAL FAME, FOR SOMETHING WONDERFUL AND GREAT. OUR HISTORY, RACE, AND CULTURE, ISN’T A JOKE And if Exp continues promoting and this starts a chain of similar events Kpop will lose what made it important, and that’s not okay with me.

Female Vietnamese-Chinese-Australian

My dad is Vietnamese, but his parents come from China. My mum is from China, but she moved with her family to Hong Kong from an early age. They speak Cantonese (or as you otherwise might know it, traditional Chinese) as a main language, although they can speak (simplified) Chinese too. I was born and raised in Australia so I identify as Australian as well as Chinese and Vietnamese.

My area has some Asians, but you can get other PoC showing up too and as a writer, I like to embrace that (that’s why this profile exists). However, most people here are non-PoC, Australia being a former British colony and whatnot.

  • Clothing

Hand me downs. When your dad has 10 sibings and 2 of them are about an hour’s drive from your house, you can’t deny that’ll happen. However, I do get new clothes every now and again.

  • Food

My family does have a habit of eating rice and/or different Chinese styles of noodles a lot for dinner, but we eat pasta and other cultural foods every now and then. A typical lunch is normally a sandwich or fast food, while breakfast can be anything from dim sims to toast to apple pie (I think the apple pie is just a scrounge-for-money excuse on my mum’s part though).

We do eat Vietnamese food for dinner (a cold vermicelli dish with mint/lettuce, fish sauce and soft shell crab/spring rolls/cha lua/surimi scallops - or a combo of those - known verbally as something along the lines of “moong” to me, although I don’t know its proper name or spelling) or lunch (banh mi or pho), although the likelihood of having Vietnamese food for any given meal is significantly rarer than Western-style food/rice and normally it’s my dad who’ll eat pho.

We used to go out for yum cha for lunch (despite it being breakfast in most cases in Hong Kong) every now and again. When we’re in Hong Kong though, my maternal grandma makes us go to yum cha for breakfast and then to the same restaurant for dinner. There’s one dish I love from yum cha specifically (prawns in cheong fun with soya sauce) which is often on the menu and why I don’t mind yum cha in most cases.

My mum loves Japanese food, but my dad doesn’t like most raw things (I had a childhood friend whose mother used to work at a sushi shop, so we got lots of discounted food - it didn’t help my dad one bit) so me and my sisters have grown up eating sushi/okonomiyaki/sashimi and we’ll eat this stuff on birthdays or special occasions. That’s how we get into anime and learning Japanese at school. 

  • Holidays

My family is atheist, with a mild exception on my smallest sister’s part (she believed in the optional religious education classes a little too much, and so is a bit more insistent on Christianity). We normally go out to Chinese New Year celebrations in our vicinity (we normally buy the spiral potatoes on skewers and/or batter-coated octopus tentacles and eat them if not collecting freebies). We’ll eat mooncake, tang yuan or the like as a celebratory food around the relevant holidays, although we do sometimes eat them out of season if the food is around and cheap. We don’t take days off around Chinese New Year like Chinese are supposed to, but we do take breaks around Easter, Christmas etc. because schools, supermarkets etc. close on those days.

Red pockets (actually red envelopes, they have money in them) are a custom for birthdays, Christmas, New Year, weddings and Chinese New Year. If your birthday is close to one of the other listed holidays, you get one instead of two (see this profile for explanation). There is no set amount for the others, but normally for a 20-something-year old the cap is about AU $50 (we send the equivalent in American money to American relatives, but that’s less often than the ones we see in person and remember the birthdays for), and for weddings you should give more than that. 

We take basically any excuse to get together with extended family and Asian family parties are never dull. The adults, especially, gossip long into the night and if they bust out the alcohol, they go home at midnight or 2 am because…obvious reasons.

  • Identity issues

I thought, when I was younger, my surname was Chinese, but it turned out to be Vietnamese put through American pronunciation. I told my friends…and they didn’t give any reaction. Either they took it in their stride or just continued to think I was Chinese/Chinese-Australian like them.

I’ve been to Vietnam and Hong Kong on family trips before and for some reason, even though Australia is “home” to me, when all the people look closer to what you do and experience life similar to what you do, you feel like you’re “at home” in a weird sense. Can’t speak a speck of Vietnamese and my Cantonese and Chinese have fallen out of good use though, so I’m just berated by older relatives (in Cantonese and most times to my parents’ faces) when I visit them and speak in English.

I’m a bit more tan than my sisters due to neglecting sunscreen on sunny days, but my dad used to joke to me and my sisters that I was Filipino/Indian and looking back on it, that was pretty toxic. (It was also kinda hypocritical because he’s tanner than me, but he never pointed that out.) Some other people may get offended at being called “banana” or “ABC” (Australian-born Chinese), but me and my sisters can take it as a joke.

Talking about the Vietnam War is kinda awkward for me, as my dad escaped from it in his youth. I learnt about the war while doing an international studies course and being to Vietnam - there was this aura of coldness around it all the while and I don’t think I’ll ever get rid of it.

  • Language

I was taught Cantonese from birth, but Australia being as it is means English is my default. I had to learn Chinese and Japanese from language schools and school courses.

Hong Kong was British up until 1997, so there’s lots of English (the language, the people aren’t that common there) around and it’s easier to get by there (for me) than Vietnam. Vietnam was French in the 1800s so my dad knows limited French, but I’ve never learnt French. 

  • Study

I used to try and keep up with my parents’ standards of “play piano!”, “get good grades!” etc. etc. but as time wore on, I found I didn’t want to. In the end, I found they’re not too worried, so long as I do well in what I want to do and pass in what I need to do. 

…I’m also a proud procrastinator, as bad as that is.

  • Micro-aggressions

Notice how I’ve used “Cantonese” as a term for traditional Chinese, and “Chinese” for simplified? Cantonese and Chinese are completely different beasts. (I can get kinda picky about it, even though “Canton” is a somewhat whitewashed term and doesn’t refer to Hong Kong per se…I use the terms because I have no better way of distinguishing between the two.)

  • Tropes I’m tired of seeing

Kung fu Asians. Not all Asians are willing to whip your butt into shape with martial arts - most Asians wouldn’t know martial arts. For that matter, tai chi/taekwondo/karate/gong fu do not equal each other (yeah, Karate Kid with Jaden Smith is a misnomer).

  • Things I’d like to see more of

There’s one show I thought was fairly accurate in depicting a life like mine, and that’s The Family Law. Showing more family dynamics like that would be great.

I’d also like to see close siblings, regardless of genre, gender or race. (Not twins or OreImo, either - that’s a little too close.) I’m very close to my older sister, to the point where if we weren’t blood related, we’d be best friends.

It’s a weird demand, but regardless of where your story’s set or who it’s aimed at, I get kinda disappointed when people have an eating scene and they could check up some weird and wonderful food for it - for a workplace or school scene, a sandwich can make sense and it’s fine, but for one example, in fantasy feasts people eat “boar meat” and sometimes I wish they’d eat char siu instead of being so generic. Just do your research properly, spell the words properly and it’ll fit right in if it’s appropriate and/or relevant.

Read more POC Profiles here or submit your own.

9

Minoritized languages moodboard: Manchu

Manchu (ᠮᠠᠨᠵᡠ ᡤᡳᠰᡠᠨ manju gisun) is a severily endangered language spoken in Manchuria. It was the language of the Qing dynasty, but over the last centuries has been replaced by Mandarin Chinese.

For anon

Expressing Love in ASEAN Languages
  • English: I love you.
  • Bahasa Indonesia: Aku cinta kamu.
  • Bahasa Melayu: Saya sayang awak.
  • Chinese: 我愛你。 (Wo ai ni.)
  • Filipino: Mahal kita.
  • Khmer: ខ្ញុំស្រលាញ់អ្នក។ (Khnhom sraleanh anak.)
  • Lao: ຂ້ອຍຮັກເຈົ້າ. (Khoi huk chau.)
  • Myanmar: မင်းကိုချစ်တယ်။ (Mainnkohkyittaal)
  • Tamil: நான் உன்னை காதலிக்கிறேன். (Nāṉ uṉṉai kātalikkiṟēṉ.)
  • Thai: ผมรักคุณ (Phom rak khun.)
  • Vietnamese: Anh yêu em.
Research:Large to Small Scale, Avoiding Homogenizing East Asian Cultures, & Paralleling Regions Appropriately

I’m currently working on a project set in a secondary world, but with nations that roughly correspond to major cultures in our world. 

By that I mean I’m trying to create amalgamations of cultural groups. For example, one country corresponds to Germanic cultures, one to Celtic, one to Mediterranean. There are, so far, also countries that correspond to Eastern Asia - a mixture of Japanese, Chinese and Korean, mainly - South America, “Arab countries” and so on. My first question, in that regard, would be whether or not this concept - creating a “vibe” that reads Eastern Asian, for example, but is not one specific culture - is offensive and if it is, what I can do to solve it. 

The project I’m working on makes use of so called FaceClaims, which means that, for example, actors are used to represent fictional characters. If I based the country on China alone, then I could only use Chinese FCs and would thus greatly limit the representation. A solution I thought of was to have each country be inofficially split up in itself, so the “East Asian” country would have a “Chinese” region, a “Korean” region and so on.
Secondly, I have a desert region that I thought would be nice for an “African” (I am very much aware that there is no such thing as an “African culture”, so bear with me) cultural group. For this “country”, I thought of a loose union between different nations of people. There, I’m stuck - should I choose one region in Africa, let’s say West Africa, and base each nation on one specific peoples there? Or should I create my own “African-inspired” cultures? Or should I choose cultures from all around Africa and base a nation on each?

My third question goes along a similar line: The “cultures” I have chosen for the countries are by far not all there are in the world. There is no country for Native Americans, for example, none for South-Eastern Asians (unless I integrate them with my “India”), no Central Asian, etc. I know it is impossible to include all cultures there are in the world, but how do I choose which ones to represent in a concept like mine? I don’t want to exclude them, but I simply cannot create as many countries as there are cultural groups.

One possible solution I thought of specifically refers to Jewish people, since I feel it is important to represent them more in fantasy writing. My current idea was to have their story go similar to that of our world: Exile, long travels, and a split into groups, one of which would be the Ashkenazim, living somewhere near the Germanic country, and the other would be the Sephardim, which I imagined to live in between the “Arab” and “African” country, in a semi-autonomous city-state. But is it offensive to adapt what happened to the Jewish people in a secondary world or should I make it so that they have a more positive past and life, no exile like there was in our world? As far as I know, the exile is an important part of Jewish identity and cultural understanding, but I thought I’d ask anyway.

I’m going to preface this that some of this wording might sound very harsh, but I recognize you are genuinely asking out of a place of respect but you just aren’t sure what the best way to respect the world’s diversity is. The problem is it’s still not quite respectful enough, and shows sometimes glaring ignorance of nuances in the region.

I would also like to remind people that just because your exact question hasn’t been answered to the full scope you’re looking at, doesn’t mean you can’t get an answer as a whole. For example, we’ve discussed the concept of how and when to mix different cultures in the East Asian tag. Shira will cover your questions regarding Jewish representation below. 

However, I’m going to specifically tackle this from a research and worldbuilding perspective, primarily talking about a history of forced homogenization and how to avoid recreating colonialism/imperialism.

Notes on Language and False Equivalences

For starters, basically all of these groups are too broad. By a long shot. Either they flatten sometimes dozens to thousands of cultures (“Native American country” is in the thousands, “West Africa” is in the hundreds, “China, Japan, Korea” is in the dozens, if not hundreds, same deal with India). This language use makes people pretty uncomfortable, because it implies that the basis is stereotypes. It implies you haven’t done research, or, at least, haven’t done enough. When discussing nuance, it’s best to imply you understand there is nuance— like you did with Africa and Jewish culture, but neglected to do everywhere else.

You also go very broad with all non-European cultures, but narrow down a general homogeneous part for your European analogues, by picking Germanic and Celtic.

This double standard is something that is exactly what we try to draw attention to at WWC: to our ears, it sounds like “I’m taking Germanic peoples for Europe, but I’m going to mix three East Asian countries because those two regions have the equivalent amount of sameness that I can pass it off.”

While that sounds specific to just you, it’s not. We’ve received this type of question dozens of times in the past and it’s a general cultural attitude we’ve faced lots and lots and lots of times. Western society makes you think the equivalence is equal, because they’ve flattened all non-European countries with the single broadest brush, but it’s not.

I would also caution you on relying on media images for face claims, because media images only represent the idealized version of beauty. We’ve written multiple description guides that point out how much variety exists within all ethnic groups and how people seeing us as all the same is a microaggression.

You are right that you can’t tackle all of the world’s diversity into your worldbuilding, because, well, there is so much. The core of your question is basically how to narrow it down, which is what I’m going to tackle.

My suggestion is twofold: 

  1. Research big, top level things, over a few centuries— namely, keep track of empires that have tried to take over places and look at what groups Western society lumps together when it spreads multiple regions.
  2. Build small with a focus on a very specific place and group— namely, pick the smallest possible region you can and see what you have to build from there.

Researching Big

Researching big helps you catch what not to flatten, or at least, where flattening might be reinforcing situations that a government perpetuated. I’m going to focus on East Asia since that’s the bulk of your question, and it’s also where I’ve spent some time worldbuilding. The principles apply to all groups you’re trying to research.

East Asia— namely Japan, Korea, and China, although that is an oversimplification itself— is composed of two empires: China and Japan. This makes homogenization extremely risky because you’re touching two nerves of countries trying to take over in very recent history.

China has taken over a very large swath of land over centuries, and still has independence fights to this day from their recent history. As a result, they have both a roughly overreaching culture because the empire is so old, and a very fractured culture with over 50 recognized ethnic groups. When you think of “Chinese” you usually think of the dominant Han Chinese, but because of its old empire roots you can get a giant variety. In modern day, some provinces have kept their individual culture, while others have been part of China for so long there is a general “sameness” to them that can capture the flare you want.

Japan’s imperialism is similarly recent, only ending in 1947, and it left wounds across the Pacific (including Korea, China, Taiwan, the Philippines, and Malaysia). Many of their actions are classified as war crimes. They’ve also erased their own Indigenous population by insisting only one ethnicity lived in the country. Both of these factors make mixing Japan into an “East Asian” mix tricky. Japan’s culture, while heavily impacted by China and Korea, is pretty distinct because of its island status.

Big research also lets you see the neighbouring areas at a time borders might not have been the same. For example, in the 1600s, China was much smaller because the Manchu External Expansion hadn’t happened yet. As a result, places we now think of as “Chinese” actually weren’t, and you’ll have to account for these differences in your worldbuilding. You can determine this by looking up historical maps/empires, which might require book research (libraries are wonderful).

This does not mean you can ignore recent history, however. Because the story is set in modern day, people will be viewing it through a modern lens. You need to research both the modern and the historical context in order to understand how to go about crafting a respectful world.

So that’s stuff you would’ve discovered by big research. By tracking empire movements, you can see where old wounds are and what historical contexts exist within whatever region you’re pulling from. If you take North America, you can see how each individual tribe is cast aside in favour of settler stories; in Africa, you can see how multiple empires wanted to plunder the land and didn’t care who it was; in the Middle East, you can see both the recent military involvement, the historical Ottomans, and the historical Persians.

Build Small

You can also see what empires influenced their regions for long enough to create a similar-ish culture throughout multiple regions, which can help you extract the essence you’re looking for. I would add a very large caution to only do this for historical empires where those who suffered under the regime are not fighting in present day/ have living memory of it (such as incorporating too much of England, France, or Spain in the Americas, along with the two examples above).

Now you can build small. If you wanted to give a sense of, say, coastal China with a heavy amount of trade, you can pick a major port city in China and figure out the pluralism in relation to that city. What parts identify it as Chinese (architecture, governance, food, general religious practices— folklore changes by region, but the general gist of practices can remain similar enough to get a vibe), and what parts are borrowed from a distinct enough culture they’re noticeably different?

By going from a city level, you can imply pluralism by throwing in asides of differences “out there” that shows you’ve thought about it, without cramming your world full of cultures you can’t fit in the plot. You can then also narrow down what to include based on map proximity: if there’s an easy sea or land path to an Egyptian analogue, you’re probably going to at least hint at it. This is a known historical trade, btw. Egyptian blue and Han purple are made of similar substances, pointing to an ancient cultural link.

You can research this by simply googling the country and looking under its history in Wikipedia. If you look up “China”, you can see “Imperial Unification” as one of its history points. “Japan” similarly gets you the Meiji period. Turkey shows the Ottoman empire. You can also look up “empires in [region]” that will give you a similar overview. This even works for places you don’t think have historical empires, such as North America (the pre-colonization section notes several).

This also is a starting place for what the borders would’ve been during any given time period, and gives you places to potentially factor in military involvement and recent strife. This is where modern research comes in handy, because you can get an idea of what that strife looked like.

Hope this gives you an idea how to go about worldbuilding a diverse population, and how to avoid paralleling recent wounds. 

~ Mod Lesya

Regarding Your Jewish Characters

I think it’s valid to reflect our real history in fantasy although if you dwell too much on the suffering aspects and not the “richly varied cultural traditions” aspects you’ll probably lose some of us because suffering-porn written from the outside gets old fast (if you’re Jewish yourself you 200% have the right to write this, of course.) Human Jewish characters living in pockets in fake-northern-Europe and fake-Mediterranea and fake-North-Africa (or even Fake China and Fake India; we’re there, too) is actually injecting some well-needed historical accuracy back into a genre that’s been badly whitewashed, gentilewashed, etc by imagining a Europe where nobody but white gentiles existed until they conveniently popped into existence during whatever era the writer thinks is appropriate.

In other words, if your fake Germany has a Jewish neighborhood in its largest city, that’s a way of making pseudo-European fantasy more realistic and less -washy, and is overall a good move, despite the fact that the destruction of the temple is the reason we were in Germany in the first place. (I mean… it’s not like you’re planning on sitting there writing about Tisha b'Av itself, right? You don’t have to say “And the reason there are Jews here is because a bazillion years ago, we wound up getting scattered” just to have Jews.)

By the way, having myself written secondary-world fantasy where entire countries, plural, get to be majority-Jewish, and 100% free of on-screen antisemitism, I think both ways are valid.

–Shira

9

Minoritized languages moodboard: Hmong

Hmong or Mong (lus Hmoob / lug Moob / lol Hmongb) is the language of the Hmong peole, who live in of southern central China, northern Vietnam, Thailand, Myanmar and Laos.

For anon

There are words I wish I could say to you that are lost at the bottom of the sea. When you first came here, you taught your mouth the right way to speak to keep them from questioning you. You tried your best to scale the accent from your serpentine tongue, you were afraid they would find the foreignness unsettling and dangerous. But in secret, you raised me to speak the language of your home because it was the only way you could understand what love sounded like. I have lost it over the years. Left pellets of warmth buried underneath the sand. Unraveled history by the frays from my tired attempts of stringing together a coherent sentence for you. Spilled a cleaner, more eloquent, but American hue on our colors. They say English is the language of success. But I watched you struggle to find the right words to tell your boss you would work overtime. And you watched me give up on finding the right words to say you mean everything to me. How did I not see that there was something missing to this? That I lost something when I stopped trying to get you to hear me. That I let you go when I stopped trying to listen. Sacrifice is hard to grasp when you don’t know you have anything to lose. I didn’t know I had everything to lose.
—  Speak English Unless You Want To Go Home

the-childrens-era  asked:

From what I understand, correct me if I'm wrong, you mostly taught yourself Korean. Do you have any study tips or just miscellaneous tips for those of use wanting to learn Korean or any other language?

Omg. So you’re self-taught in Korean, Kylie? That’s awesome!! How did u do it? Give us tips please! I’ve already learned to read hangul but how/where can I learn/improve vocab and grammar?

Do you have any tips for someone who’s trying to learn Korean?

hi!! how did you pick up korean, and how long did it take you? thank you :)

Do you have any tips for learning Korean? I really want to start but I am not sure of the best method.

Is there any material you would be able to recommend for an English speaker self teaching themselves Korean? If so, thank you!

Okay, so I’m gonna write a lot write now so be prepared. I’ll break it up into sections.

How I learned Korean (to the level I am at right now):

I started learning Korean naturally during 8th grade (2010) or so. I had a really close friend who would teach me Korean words and by this time I was into a few K-pop groups (mainly SHINee) and watched a few Korean dramas. Out of interest in learning new language, I decided to teach myself how to read and write in Korean. Once I hit the summer before my freshman year, I met another really close friend who introduced me to more and more groups and showed me Korean shows. This is probably when I got really into Korean music, culture, etc. I began finding more shows by myself, became more active in fandoms through Twitter, Tumblr, etc. Before I knew it, watching these variety shows, dramas, videos, and reading lyrics allowed me to pick up the language. I never had a formal education as my school (high school and university) did not/do not provide the language. However because of this, most of the Korean I know is conversational and I am most confident in understanding (instead of writing, speaking). Although I translate, I am by no means fluent in the language, although I soon hope to be!

Tips on learning Korean (or any language):

1. Start off by learning hangul or the Korean writing system (or “alphabet”). You can do this by looking up a table of the characters online. 

2. Begin practicing by reading lyrics, tweets by BTS, whatever you can get your hands on. You don’t have to know what you are saying, but it is important to practice and solidify your knowledge of hangul.

3. Figure out your learning style. If you are an auditory learner, try watching videos in Korean like variety shows and dramas (not historical). Read the subtitles carefully and be aware of the words you are hearing as you are reading. I feel like many people unintentionally tune out the audio of a video when watching videos in Korean. If you stay aware, it will be much easier to pick up the language. This is how I picked up Korean. Other ways to learn are through more traditional methods like textbooks and workbooks. If you don’t want physical textbooks there are many apps and online sites that provide PDFs and even podcasts. I don’t use online sites, but I have heard a lot about Talk To Me In Korean.

4. Stay motivated. I know it is really difficult, especially if English is your only language, but you really have to want to learn the language. If you have no interest or motivation, I’m sad to say this, but you won’t be able to learn the language since there is no teacher to force you to learn as there would be in a classroom setting. 

5. Practice/study regularly. I think all people who have learned a language in high school can say this with confidence. If you don’t practice/study the language regularly, all of what you have learned will just fade from your memory. 

Material for learning Korean:

I always refer to this guide, but Tumblr user hobuing made a post as to how she learned Korean and it has a few links to sites and PDFs [here]. 

What do I do when I don’t know a word in Korean: 

Naturally as I am not fluent, I don’t know all the words that I read. When this happens DO NOT USE GOOGLE TRANSLATE. Google Translate is absolutely horrible when translating (at least for Asian languages). I look up words on endic.naver.com (to find the direct English meaning) or dic.naver.com (to find the Korean definition of a word). As slang isn’t present in a typical dictionary, for slang that I don’t know I often google “____ 뜻" (____ meaning) and read what Korean people say the slang means.

- Kylie