ashton johnson

Writing Prompt Quotes

This is for everyone else to use. Tag me in your works, I would love to read them!


1. “When did I ever imply that I wanted you?”

2. “Let’s take a trip.”

3. “This place is for children.”

4. “Go home.”

5. “Stay away.”

6. “There’s nothing you could say to me that would ever make me stop.” 

7. “You’re scared.”

8. “I may be wrong, but…”

9. “I don’t bite.”

10. “Okay, darling.”

11. “Get me out of here.”

12. “You’ve been gone for so long.”

13. “Don’t fall asleep.”

14. “I adore you.”

15. “Do you love me?”

16. “You pop that gum one more time…”

17. “You’re such a fucking gemini.” (or any other horoscope sign you’d like)

18. “There’s a difference between being happy and being distracted.”

19. “You look just like… Nevermind.”

20. “I was angry and I took it out on you, which is totally unfair.”

21. “That was in the past.”

22. “Can you believe we did that?”

23. “I don’t like when you do that.”

24. “Get the hell out.”

25. “I never said that.”

26. “I don’t think we can do this anymore.”

27. “I told you not to say anything!”

28. “What’s wrong?”

29. “It meant nothing.”

30. “I miss this.”

31. “If I spend $4,250 on alcohol, it better kill me.”

32. “I want answers.”

33. “I don’t have anything to say.”

34. “If I gave you a chance, would you take it?”

35. “Look, look, look!”

36. “My sims get more action than I do.”

37. “You have to do it.”

38. “What are you laughing at?”

39. “Coraline is terrifying!”

40. “I heard you! Damn.”

41. “Do you think we were made for each other?”

42. “Can I text you?”

43. “Should I be worried?”

44. “Stop right there.”

45. “You’ve listened to it six times in a row.”

46. “Take a chance.”

47. “Disney or die!”

48. “Maybe you should move your hand.” 

49. “I only speak in iconic vine quotes.” 

50. “Forever and ever.”

51. “Your color is beautiful.”

52. “Your aura is irresistible.”

53. “Why are you staring at me like that?”

54. “You did that? While five months pregnant?”

55. “You’re only allowed to use the ‘F’ word three times a day.”

56. “We’re closer than we used to be.”

57. “I missed this.” 

58. “We have the house all to ourselves… I’ll get the board games!”

59. “I’m broke, but…”

60. “You’re so beautiful in the sun.”

8

2017 U.S. Classic x Leotards

I can't lose you, not again ALEX EARNEST

Sometimes, your brain brings up the memories you wish you would forget. The ones that bring pain, and insecurity to the surface.

It was one of those nights for you. You couldn’t shut your brain off, you tried your best. Nothing was stopping and you kept being transported back to that god awful night.

The night of your boyfriends birthday party. It started off amazing, and everything you wanted it to be. You threw it for him, paid a lot for it so it could be a great day for him, he deserved it. He always treated you and like his queen so you decided to go all out for his birthday. Lots of alcohol, good friends and great music. What could go wrong. Ha, you laugh to yourself now, how little did you know that In just a few hours your heart would face its biggest and most deadly crack. You went to look for your boyfriend, he had disappeared and it was time to cut the cake. You checked everywhere but the bedroom, it was your last place to check. You reach the door and hear moans, moans of pure pleasure. Hmm, you open the door, to see the love of your life, his lips attached to another female, and his hands in her underwear. You stood there, frozen, tears rolling down your face.

You left him, you grabbed your suitcase, packed then headed to a friends. Alex texted and called constantly, begging for you to talk to him, begging to explain himself. You couldn’t bear it, you just weren’t ready to hear his voice yet, it took you six months for you to be ready to face him. When you guys finally talked, you decided you could forgive him and make things work.

You hated nights like this, you get up off your couch and head to the freezer, hoping that there is still some ice cream left so you can binge eat and binge watch some Netflix. Ugh, nothing in here. And Alex wouldn’t be home for another hour. You throw your shoes on and head to the store across from your house. You head out the door, and start making your way to the store. As you’re crossing the street, you hear a screech and everything goes black.


Alex gets a call on his phone from your mom, saying to meet her at the hospital, she won’t tell him why, just to get there as fast as he can. He speeds, and is surprised no cops pulled him over for doing over 90 miles on a 35 mph street.
When he gets there, your mom tells him. You were walking to the store, less than 100 feet from your house, when a drunk driver hits you, you were barely hanging on to your life.

All he is thinking about how he can’t lose you, not again. He just got you back. And then the tears flood down his eyes and he just can’t stop them

Early last August, an envelope with extraordinary handling restrictions arrived at the White House. Sent by courier from the CIA, it carried “eyes only” instructions that its contents be shown to just four people: President Barack Obama and three senior aides.

Inside was an intelligence bombshell, a report drawn from sourcing deep inside the Russian government that detailed Russian President Vladi­mir Putin’s direct involvement in a cyber campaign to disrupt and discredit the U.S. presidential race.

But it went further. The intelligence captured Putin’s specific instructions on the operation’s audacious objectives — defeat or at least damage the Democratic nominee, Hillary Clinton, and help elect her opponent, Donald Trump.

At that point, the outlines of the Russian assault on the U.S. election were increasingly apparent. Hackers with ties to Russian intelligence services had been rummaging through Democratic Party computer networks, as well as some Republican systems, for more than a year. In July, the FBI had opened an investigation of contacts between Russian officials and Trump associates. And on July 22, nearly 20,000 emails stolen from the Democratic National Committee were dumped online by WikiLeaks.

But at the highest levels of government, among those responsible for managing the crisis, the first moment of true foreboding about Russia’s intentions arrived with that CIA intelligence.

The material was so sensitive that CIA Director John Brennan kept it out of the President’s Daily Brief, concerned that even that restricted report’s distribution was too broad. The CIA package came with instructions that it be returned immediately after it was read. To guard against leaks, subsequent meetings in the Situation Room followed the same protocols as planning sessions for the Osama bin Laden raid.

It took time for other parts of the intelligence community to endorse the CIA’s view. Only in the administration’s final weeks in office did it tell the public, in a declassified report, what officials had learned from Brennan in August — that Putin was working to elect Trump.

[Putin ‘ordered’ effort to undermine faith in U.S. election and help Trump, report says]

Over that five-month interval, the Obama administration secretly debated dozens of options for deterring or punishing Russia, including cyberattacks on Russian infrastructure, the release of CIA-gathered material that might embarrass Putin and sanctions that officials said could “crater” the Russian economy.

But in the end, in late December, Obama approved a modest package combining measures that had been drawn up to punish Russia for other issues — expulsions of 35 diplomats and the closure of two Russian compounds — with economic sanctions so narrowly targeted that even those who helped design them describe their impact as largely symbolic.

Obama also approved a previously undisclosed covert measure that authorized planting cyber weapons in Russia’s infrastructure, the digital equivalent of bombs that could be detonated if the United States found itself in an escalating exchange with Moscow. The project, which Obama approved in a covert-action finding, was still in its planning stages when Obama left office. It would be up to President Trump to decide whether to use the capability.

In political terms, Russia’s interference was the crime of the century, an unprecedented and largely successful destabilizing attack on American democracy. It was a case that took almost no time to solve, traced to the Kremlin through cyber-forensics and intelligence on Putin’s involvement. And yet, because of the divergent ways Obama and Trump have handled the matter, Moscow appears unlikely to face proportionate consequences.

Those closest to Obama defend the administration’s response to Russia’s meddling. They note that by August it was too late to prevent the transfer to WikiLeaks and other groups of the troves of emails that would spill out in the ensuing months. They believe that a series of warnings — including one that Obama delivered to Putin in September — prompted Moscow to abandon any plans of further aggression, such as sabotage of U.S. voting systems.


Denis McDonough, who served as Obama’s chief of staff, said that the administration regarded Russia’s interference as an attack on the “heart of our system.”

“We set out from a first-order principle that required us to defend the integrity of the vote,” McDonough said in an interview. “Importantly, we did that. It’s also important to establish what happened and what they attempted to do so as to ensure that we take the steps necessary to stop it from happening again.”

But other administration officials look back on the Russia period with remorse.

“It is the hardest thing about my entire time in government to defend,” said a former senior Obama administration official involved in White House deliberations on Russia. “I feel like we sort of choked.”

The post-election period has been dominated by the overlapping investigations into whether Trump associates colluded with Russia before the election and whether the president sought to obstruct the FBI probe afterward. That spectacle has obscured the magnitude of Moscow’s attempt to hijack a precious and now vulnerable-seeming American democratic process.

Beset by allegations of hidden ties between his campaign and Russia, Trump has shown no inclination to revisit the matter and has denied any collusion or obstruction on his part. As a result, the expulsions and modest sanctions announced by Obama on Dec. 29 continue to stand as the United States’ most forceful response.

“The punishment did not fit the crime,” said Michael McFaul, who served as U.S. ambassador to Russia for the Obama administration from 2012 to 2014. “Russia violated our sovereignty, meddling in one of our most sacred acts as a democracy — electing our president. The Kremlin should have paid a much higher price for that attack. And U.S. policymakers now — both in the White House and Congress — should consider new actions to deter future Russian interventions.”

The Senate this month passed a bill that would impose additional election- and Ukraine-related sanctions on Moscow and limit Trump’s ability to lift them. The measure requires House approval, however, and Trump’s signature.

This account of the Obama administration’s response to Russia’s interference is based on interviews with more than three dozen current and former U.S. officials in senior positions in government, including at the White House, the State, Defense and Homeland Security departments, and U.S. intelligence services. Most agreed to speak only on the condition of anonymity, citing the sensitivity of the issue.

The White House, the CIA, the FBI, the National Security Agency and the Office of the Director of National Intelligence declined to comment.

[…]

The secrecy extended into the White House.
Susan Rice, Avril Haines and White House homeland-security adviser Lisa Monaco convened meetings in the Situation Room to weigh the mounting evidence of Russian interference and generate options for how to respond. At first, only four senior security officials were allowed to attend: Brennan, Clapper, Attorney General Loretta E. Lynch and FBI Director James B. Comey. Aides ordinarily allowed entry as “plus-ones” were barred.

Gradually, the circle widened to include Vice President Biden and others. Agendas sent to Cabinet secretaries — including John F. Kerry at the State Department and Ashton B. Carter at the Pentagon — arrived in envelopes that subordinates were not supposed to open. Sometimes the agendas were withheld until participants had taken their seats in the Situation Room.

Throughout his presidency, Obama’s approach to national security challenges was deliberate and cautious. He came into office seeking to end wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. He was loath to act without support from allies overseas and firm political footing at home. He was drawn only reluctantly into foreign crises, such as the civil war in Syria, that presented no clear exit for the United States.

Obama’s approach often seemed reducible to a single imperative: Don’t make things worse. As brazen as the Russian attacks on the election seemed, Obama and his top advisers feared that things could get far worse.

They were concerned that any pre-election response could provoke an escalation from Putin. Moscow’s meddling to that point was seen as deeply concerning but unlikely to materially affect the outcome of the election. Far more worrisome to the Obama team was the prospect of a cyber-assault on voting systems before and on Election Day.

They also worried that any action they took would be perceived as political interference in an already volatile campaign. By August, Trump was predicting that the election would be rigged. Obama officials feared providing fuel to such claims, playing into Russia’s efforts to discredit the outcome and potentially contaminating the expected Clinton triumph.

Before departing for an August vacation to Martha’s Vineyard, Obama instructed aides to pursue ways to deter Moscow and proceed along three main paths: Get a high-confidence assessment from U.S. intelligence agencies on Russia’s role and intent; shore up any vulnerabilities in state-run election systems; and seek bipartisan support from congressional leaders for a statement condemning Moscow and urging states to accept federal help.

— 

Greg Miller, Ellen Nakashima, and Adam Entous at The Washington Post on former President Obama’s attempts to punish Russia for its role in meddling in the 2016 elections (06.23.2017)

In an envelope from the CIA shown to just former President Obama and 3 other aides of his in August 2016, the letter revealed that Putin had a gameplan: defeat (or least severely weaken) Hillary and elect Trump as the 45th President.


See Also: Washington Post: The Post’s new findings in Russia’s bold campaign to influence the U.S. election

When your fav is finally in your country but you can’t see them

When you and your friend at the lunchroom and you and your friend are Fan of 5sos/Magcon/1D and someone sits with ya’ll talking shit about them…

December 2015 Snapchat Masterpost

The December list:

Anthony Quintal (Lohanthony) ~ aanthoony

Aaron Carpenter ~ aaron-carp

Alex Reininga ~ alex_reininga

Alex Aiono ~ alexaiono

Alex Constancio ~ alexcons

Alx James ~ alxjames10

Amanda Steele ~ amandasteele24

Andrea Russett ~ andwizzle

Ansel Elgort ~ anselelgort

Ben J Pierce ~ benjpierce

Noah Pierce ~ bhcfidhbbdud

Brandon Calvillo ~ bjcalvillo

Calvin Harris ~ calvinharris

Christian Akridge ~ christianisms

Chris Collins ~ weekly-chris

Crawford Collins ~ crawfordcollins

Carl Chiasson ~ carl_chiasonn

Caspar Lee ~ casparlee1994

Jc Caylen ~ chamclouder

Chase Goehring ~ chasegoehring

Chris O'Flyng ~ chrisoflyng

Cody Johns ~ codyjohns

Colby Brock ~ colbyvlogs

Conan Gray ~ conanxcanon

Cole Pendery ~ capim5

Conor Richard ~ conor-richard

Courtney Eaton ~ courteaton

Corey Bowler ~ coreybowler

Dana Vaughns ~ whatchutrynado

Danny Edge ~ dannytheedge

Lia Marie Johnson ~ dappyhays

Devin Hayes ~ devinhayes

Dinah Jane ~ dinahdime

Jake Foushee ~ drfoosh

Eben Franckewitz ~ ebenfranckewitz

Edwin Burgos ~ edtertaining

Bryant Eslava ~ eslava

Ethan Dolan ~ ethandolan8

Thomas Sanders ~ foster_dawg

Frankie Grande ~ frankiejg8

George Shelly ~ higeorgeshelly

Louis Cole ~ funforlouis

GloZell Green ~ glozellg

Golden ~ goldenthe24k

Grayson Dolan ~ graysonbdolan

Harrison Webb ~ harrisonwebb007

Tyler Iacona ~ iamtyleriacona

Lilly Singh (Superwoman) ~ iisuperwomanii

Alfie Deyes ~ itsalfiedeyes

Chris Klemens ~ itschrisklemens

Corey Scherer ~ itscoreyscherer

LaurDIY ~ itslaurdiy

Tyler White ~ itylerhd

Jack Johnson ~ jaaackjohnson2

Jack Dail ~ jaackdail

Jack Baran (ThatSoJack) ~jackmtthw

Jacob Whitesides ~ jacobontour

Jai Brooks ~ jaibroo95

The Janoskians ~ janoskians

Cameron Phillips ~ jcameronp

Jeffrey Boyle ~ jeffreyboyle

Jeremy Shayne ~ jeremyshayne

Jim Chapman ~ jimchapman

Joey Graceffa ~ joeygraceffa16

John Green ~ johngreensnaps

Joey Kidney ~ joeykidney

Josh Peck ~ joshuapeck

Jenn McAllister ~ jxnnpxnn

Kenny Holland ~ kennyholland

Kian and Jc ~ kianandjc

James Yammouni ~ kingyammouni

Ross Lynch ~ ledcorsair

Nash Grier ~ lifeofnash

Little Mix ~ littlemix_offic

Tyde Levi ~ m.tyde

Margarita Elizabeth ~ margarita4444

Mac Harmon ~ macharmon

Maroon 5 ~ maroon5

Matt Skajem ~ mattowto

Mazzi Maz ~ mazzi_maz

Michael Clifford (private rn) ~ michaelgcliffor

Ariana Grande ~ moonlightbae

Nick Jonas ~ jicknonas

Dylan Dauzat ~ ohdauzat

Normani Kordei ~ moniloves31

Chris Cabanatan ~ notlikechris

Matt Espinosa ~ notmattespinosa

Zoe Sugg ~ officialzoella

Oli White ~ oliwhite1

One Direction ~ onedirection

Jack Gilinsky ~ jackgilinsky

Paul Zimmer ~ paulzimmersnap

Pierson Fode ~ piersonfode

Playlist Live ~ playlistsnaps

Pierson Oglesby ~ proglesby

r5 ~ r5snaps

Rebecca Black ~ rbeezle

Mamrie Hart ~ realmametown

Justin Bieber ~ rickthesizzler

Ricky Dillon ~ ricky.dillon

Rihanna ~ rihanna

Romeo Lacoste ~ romeolacoste

Sam Golbach ~ samgolbach

Sam Pottorff ~ sammpott

Sam Wilkinson ~ sammywilk11

Sawyer Hartman ~ sawyerhartman

David Scarzone ~ scarzone0207

Shawn Mendes ~ shawnmendes1

Sierra Dallas ~ sierra-dallas

Michael Mancari (sighmike) ~ sighmikedie

Nate Maloley ~ natemaloley

Alex Holtti ~ smokingalex

Tyler Oakley ~ snaptyleroakley

Dakota Brooks ~ soccerplayer321

Sebastian Olzanski ~ spaceshipseb

Kian Lawley ~ swifferme

Taylor Caniff ~ taylorcaniff

Ed Sheeran ~ teddysdaytoday

Joe Sugg ~ thatcherjoe

Cameron Dallas ~ camerondallas

Brent Rivera ~ thebrentrivera

Connor Franta ~ itsconnorfranta

Hayes Grier ~ yaboyhayesg

Rixton ~ rixtonofficial

Marcus Butler ~ themarcusbutler

Payte Parker ~ thepayteparker

Taylor Baxter ~ thetaylorbaxter

Trevor Moran ~ trevormoran

Troye Sivan ~ troyesivan

Teala Dunn ~ ttlyteala

Issa (Twaimz) ~ twaimz

Tanner Zagarino ~ tzagofficial

Luke Korns ~ unclekornicob

The Vamps ~ vampssnap

Victoria Justice ~ victoriajustice

Vidcon ~ vidconsnaps

5 Seconds of Summer ~ wearefivesos

Wesley Stromberg ~ wessnapinchats

Mikey Murphy ~ whatsamikey

Austin Mahone ~ yungmahone

Selfie C ~ xxselfiecxx

Zendaya Coleman ~ zendaya_96

Alyss ~ alyssisme