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Everyone always jokes about Danse being super obsessed with weapon/armour modding in an almost sexual way but I like to think that weapons/armour (especially power armour) are his special interests and he totally infodumps all he knows about parts etc to the Sole whenever they’re using a workbench.

Imagine Danse sitting up all night studying the parts of a laser rifle, or re-reading old manuals until they fall apart, or studying every detail of his power armour until he knows every joint and surface off by heart.

Need to talk to fellow Aspies (Aspergers people)

I’ve never mentioned this on my blog but I am on the autistic spectrum and for my current university project I would like to focus it on aspergers/ASD. I don’t know many other people with the syndrome so it would be great for anyone who has it to send me a message (it can be anonymous as I will be using them for illustrations that I may post on my blog as well as using them in my research and sketchbook so if you’d rather not have your name used that is fine) I am going to lay it out like a Q&A just to keep it a bit more organised so here it goes!

1. Tell me about an experience you had that involves your Aspergers 2. Have you had people say things to you about it that have been positive or negative? 3. How do you feel about being on the autistic spectrum? 4. How does it affect your daily life? 5. Do you have any routines or strong interests in certain things? Also if you don’t feel comfortable about answering every question don’t feel like you have to, even if you only answer one that’s fine! Thanks!

I’ve seen a few comments bandied back and forth about how we don’t need awareness, we need acceptance, so I made this. I do think that people need to be aware before they can start to be accepting, but I’d rather people came at us from a point of view of trying to understand our differences rather than just being aware of them - a more involved point of view than that of a zoo visitor goggling in through the glass.

REBLOG ONCE to enter to win the Unpuzzled Project’s stim toy giveaway! A winner will be randomly chosen on March 31, 2016!

Rules:

  • You must be 18 to enter, but we’re not going to demand to see your ID, so please use your own judgement.
  • You must have your inbox open so that we can contact you if you win.
  • You must be willing to tell us your address so that we can send you your prizes if you win.
  • You must be autistic (professionally diagnosed OR self-diagnosed).

What do you win??

  • One spinner ring of your choice from Stimtastic; choose from squids, planets, dinosaurs, infinity, or waves
  • One Tangle Jr. from Stimtastic; colors available: black, blue, purple, green, or red
  • One handheld chewable owl from Stimtastic; colors available: mint, sky blue, grey, purple
  • One Spiral Color in Motion (Water timer) from Stimtastic;
An Open Letter To Neurotypicals

(A piece I wrote for my school’s first ever poetry slam night)

Dear neurotypicals,

I mean all you “normal people”,

All you who don’t twitch when you see a cup just *this much* too far to the right,

Who don’t have to work yourself up to telling a joke only to find the conversation has moved on without you,

Those of you who don’t worry if you’re making the right facial expressions,

Who don’t worry that your smile is too small, your face not showing enough joy when your friends tell you some good news.

Dear Neurotypicals,

Those of you who don’t shake at the thought of asking that guy at the counter at McDonald’s for some barbeque sauce,

You who don’t struggle to focus even when you want to,

And I don’t mean “this class is soooo boring, I can’t even focus”,

No, I mean focusing so hard on staying focussed that you don’t even hear the words being said.

Dear Neurotypicals,

Who can get through a day without being emotionally drained,

Who don’t get home and lock themselves away because the day was too overwhelming,

Who don’t have to keep track of how much mental energy they can use, cause I don’t know how but ya’ll don’t run out of it,

Who don’t have to worry about remembering to take your medication just to function “normally”,

Who don’t flinch at the sound of a slur, all too commonly used to sound “cool”.

Dear Neurotypicals,

Anyone who can make eye contact like it’s nothing, who can go a day without putting the same six things in your pockets and panicking when you can’t find one.

Who don’t cry at the thought of someone touching your neck,

And no, because there’s always, always that one person that wants to try it,

I’m not joking. Don’t touch my neck. Ever.

I mean, unless you want me crying on the floor.

Dear Neurotypicals,

You are not “depressed” because you broke up with your girlfriend,

You are not “OCD” for having a tidy room at home,

You didn’t “have an autistic moment” because you had a “weird smile”?

Autistic people don’t have “weird smiles”? We have smiles.

Dear Neurotypicals,

You are not “Bipolar” because you have mood swings,

You are not “ADD” for getting distracted once when you’re talking,

Getting nervous over a test is not the same thing as having anxiety, because when you’re just nervous about a test you don’t cry and hyperventilate for three hours.

Dear Neurotypicals,

Stop telling us to “just be happy” and “don’t be anxious”

If someone walks up to me while I’m having an anxiety attack and goes “calm down”,

I’m not gonna be like “thank goodness you told me to calm down, now I’m cured”

Dear Neurotypicals,

My breakdown is not about how inconvenient it is for you,

The ways I keep myself focused aren’t a danger to society,

My inability to talk in a “socially appropriate way” isn’t your problem,

My self worth is not determined by how neurotypical, I mean how “normal”, I appear.

Dear Neurotypicals,

My mental illness, my neurotype is not a tragedy,

Mental illness isn’t “cool” or “cute”, it just is,

My brain is not something to be joked about,

It’s my brain.

My tapping foot,

My steady rocking,

My “weird smile”,

My lack of eye contact,

My way of speaking,

My habits,

My routines,

My happily flapping hands,

My fingers oh so carefully pulling my hair out one, two, three at a time,

and the information I keep from you is none of your concern.

Because it’s my life.

And I don’t have to explain it to you.

goo.gl
Autism in Private Renting
This study is looking at the unique challenges faced by autistic people in the private rented sector (renting from someone other than the government or registered social landlords). No identifying information will be collected (such as names, addresses or emails), making this completely anonymous. The aggregated information will be used in my dissertation and may be shared on my website (myautisticpov.com) but, again, you will in no way be identified. Thank you.

Hey, so remember how I talked about my dissertation a while back?

I’m looking for autistic people who have rented privately (not council housing or your country’s equivalent) in the past five years to fill out the questionnaire to tell me about their experiences.

I’m going to be collecting replies between now and Monday the 7th of March.

If other people could signal boost this as well, I would be super grateful.

Thanks.

Brain differences in premature babies who later develop autism

Extremely premature babies run a much higher risk of developing autism in later childhood, and even during the neonate period differences are seen in the brains of those who do. This according to a new study by researchers from Karolinska Institutet and Karolinska University Hospital in Sweden. The findings, which are published in the journal Cerebral Cortex, suggest that environmental factors can lead to autism.

Extremely preterm neonates survive at increasingly early gestation periods thanks to the advances made in intensive care in the past decades. However, babies born more than 13 weeks prematurely run a serious risk of brain damage, autism, ADHD and learning difficulties. They are exposed to numerous stress factors during a period critical to brain development, and it is possible that this plays a key part in the development of autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

In this present study, the researchers examined over 100 babies who had been born extremely prematurely (i.e. before week 27, the beginning of the third trimester). With the parents’ permission they studied the growth of the babies’ brains using magnetic resonance imaging during the neonate period, and then screened the children for autistic features when they had reached the age of six.

“We were surprised by how many – almost 30 per cent – of the extremely preterm-born children had developed ASD symptoms,” says Ulrika Ådén, researcher at the Department of Women’s and Children’s Health at Karolinska Institutet and neonatologist at the Neonatology clinic at Karolinska University Hospital in Sweden. “Amongst children born after full term pregnancy, the corresponding figure is 1 per cent.”

The researchers found that it was more common in the group of children who had developed ASD for there to have been complications during the neonate period, such as surgery, than it was amongst their prematurely born peers who had not developed ASD. Already in the neonatal period, long before the children had manifested signs of autism, differences could be observed between the extremely preterm babies who went on to develop ASD and those who did not, with diminished growth of the parts of the brain involved in social contact, empathy and language acquisition – functions that are impaired in autistic children.

Autism is generally attributed to genetic factors, even if no specific autism gene has been identified. This new study supports previous findings indicating that birth weight and complications can increase the risk of autism.

“Our study shows that environmental factors can also cause autism,” says Dr Ådén. “The brain grows best in the womb, and if the developmental environment changes too early to a life in the atmosphere, it can disrupt the organisation of cerebral networks. With new therapeutic regimes to stimulate the development of such babies and avoid stress, maybe we can reduce the risk of their developing ASD.”

I think Autism should have an animal mascot here is what has been suggested to me:

Red wolf: bad ass wolf/coyote hybrid, red=autism acceptance

Red Panda: so adorable red=autism acceptance


Macaw: beautiful red=autism acceptance rainbow like rainbow puzzle symbol

honey badger: not red or rainbow but doesn’t give a shit


kit fox: redish tint adorable red=autism acceptance

Octopus- How about an octopus? Reasons:
•the blend in to keep themselves safe but it tires them after a while
•they communicate in ways specific to types
•they spin
•they are solitary and have odd social mannerisms
•they are incredibly intelligent
•they often focus on one thing they love, i.e. Coconut shells.
•when they play, they never really look at the other octopus
•they can be red
•nobody really truly understands them besides themselves
•people research them constantly
•octopus are absolutely Amazing.

External image

Which one do you think should be our mascot?

-Im hearing a lot of honey badger and red panda. the Idea for octopus and the reasoning is very cool

Welcome to the Autistic Community!

Hi there! My name is Liese, and this is a new blog aimed at being a safe place for people who are new to the autistic community to ask questions and explore, without having to be afraid of being wrong, or of being yelled at for not knowing things. Of course, older members of the community who are willing to be patient with those still learning are also welcome!

The blog is still a work in progress, so please bear with me! I am working on a resource page that will cover common topics such as Person First Language vs. Identity First Language, stimming, sensory processing, and other such topics.

The ask and submit are open, so feel free to ask or submit anything! If you have any feedback on the accessibility of the theme, please let me know. I have tried to pick a theme that is easy to read and navigate, but let me know if it’s causing you problems.

And since I am sure people will ask: Yes, you can follow us if you’re not autistic! I am not going to be checking people’s blogs. All I ask is that you respect the purpose of the blog.

I think that’s all! I look forward to trying to help and support the newcomers to our community!

You can find my personal blog here, too.

Thank you for reading!

-Liese

walkin-our-shoes.blogspot.com.au
Walk in OUR shoes: The things you say

“The things you say” by Ally Grace.

(cn: emotional abuse)

There are lots of things you, and people like you, say. To me, and to people like me.

“Use your words.”
(But, I can’t.)

“Whats wrong with you?!”
(I don’t know; everything I guess.)

“Come on, it’s not that hard.”
(It is though.)

“Show some respect!”
(But, you don’t respect me.)

“You selfish girl!”
(Basic needs are selfish?)

“Why are you doing this to me?”
(I’m not.)

“What did I do to deserve this?”
(I don’t know.)

“You stupid girl!”
(I just don’t understand.)

“See what I have to put up with?!”
(I’m sorry for who I am.)

(And I’m not the only one.)

theaspieteacher.wordpress.com
Spectrum of Functioning – What does it all mean? – A Personal Viewpoint
I posted this meme created by Un-Boxed Brain to my Facebook page the other day with me commenting, "Exactly!". If you haven't done so already, I suggest checking out the blog by Un-Boxed Brain. [I...

Newest Blog!

I posted this meme created by Un-Boxed Brain to my Facebook page the other day with me commenting, “Exactly!”. If you haven’t done so already, I suggest checking out the blog by Un-Boxed Brain.

[Image description: A darkly textured rainbow coloured square on which embossed text says: There are no “ends” on the spectrum. Below that, white text says: When you say “ends”, you devalue some of us and dismiss all of us.]

A friend of mine posed the following question regarding it:

 I think this is interesting since functioning is a social construct (much like gender). I am curious though, since functioning should not be viewed linearly, how should one understand the spectrum of functioning in your eyes?

This really got my brain going. How should one understand the spectrum of functioning in my eyes? How do I even explain my perception of what it means to be on a “spectrum of functioning”?