as resolution for the character

Prison Break

While Yoriko Kuroiwa is imprisoned, this chapter repeats cage imagery again and again. Bujin is in a holding cell, Iwao stands with Furuta in a room adorned with barred windows, the entrance to both Kaneki and Touka’s room has physical bars that they can easily walk in and out of, while Yoriko herself slowly wastes away in the sealed off interrogation room her own execution day set.


The question is, if the jailbreak arc already happened, if Kaneki supposedly broke his cage and cracked his egg, and if Goat right now is fighting to break the structure of the world then why are all of these characters being shown with clear prisoner imagery?

Perhaps the simpler question is, why are these characters in cages in the first place? Who put them there?

Keep reading

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I really HATE finishing everything and then that’s when I notice I missed something. Happens every single time. 

Anyways, I really missed drawing these dorks so I’m making up for lost time. Have another transformation gif set among the sea of many. I forgot animation could be tedious but it’s still so fun. I also wanted to announce that I’m planning to open a patreon account very soon. I need some extra cash to pay off a few bills. ;_;

Keep reading

D&D: How to Use Character Arcs as a Dungeon Master

In my previous post on character arcs, I talked about how a player should determine how they want their character’s arc to begin and end. It was from a player’s perspective. But how does a DM write an adventure that will make that player’s arc happen?

First, get the information you need. Ask your players to each determine how their characters will begin the campaign and how they want them to change by the end of it. Then ask for copies of their character’s traits, flaws, ideals, and bonds. Note whether a player’s character is going to die tragically and if they are okay with that. With this information, you can give the players what I call a moral quandary, personalized for their own character’s arc. A moral quandary is giving the player two difficult options that the player must decide how their character would choose. The character should lean to one side of a moral quandary at the beginning of an adventure, but gradually start to lean the other way as their arc comes to completion. 

For instance, a cleric might be presented with a choice to kill an evildoer or merely capture them. If the cleric is heading down an arc where their ideal changes from “all life is precious” to “evil must be stopped at all costs” in their character arc is going to make very different choices in that situation depending on where they are on their arc.

Let’s figure out how we can use this info as a DM and where to put moral quandaries using a 9-point story structure. These are not an entire campaign, but you can use each point as a fixed point in the narrative; a story outline based on the characters’ arcs. Plenty of different stuff can happen between each point, but the points must happen to create a robust story.

Call to Action

The player is given an initial call to action. Essentially, a moral quandary disguised as a quest hook. Try to have a separate but related call to action for each player. Ideally, the players should refuse the call to action, as they haven’t been “changed” yet. If they play to their characters’ initial backgrounds and traits, they will refuse the call. You can even enforce this by loading your call with descriptions of how the character is feeling. “You are offended that someone would even offer something so morally reprehensible to you, despite the fact that you could use the money.”

A good-hearted rogue is starting a tragic fall arc and is offered a chance to make millions from some morally questionable actions involving an evil regime, but decides it is wrong. An innocent paladin starting a coming of age arc could be offered a chance to rise against an evil regime, but values their own safety. A studious apprentice wizard starting a corruption arc is offered power in exchange for service to an evil regime, but decides they can get power on their own.

Inciting Incident

Something happens to force the player to action, whether they are ready or not. Try to come up with an inciting incident that involves all of the players, not just one. The inciting incident can act as where the adventuring party finally meets.

The evil regime in the Call to Action ends up invading the players’ quiet suburb to enforce martial law. The players escape or fight back or else they and their loved ones die or are enslaved. The rogue decides to run from their debts by joining the party. The paladin has seen firsthand what the regime can do, and will now join the party to find someone else who can help them stop it. The wizard seeks out more power to stop the regime.

1st Plot Point

The players learn the first shreds of information about the overarching narrative of the campaign. After the inciting incident, some characters might not be convinced and want to turn back. This gives them a reason to continue onward together, as a team. There should be no turning back from the 1st plot point.

Players learn how this evil regime has been spreading across the kingdom. It still holds many mysteries, but its power is great and threatening. Its power is centered in a capital city, which the players now opt to travel to in order to find the things they currently desire.

1st Pinch Point

A pinch point is the first real display of power from the antagonist or opposing force. In D&D this should be actual combat, though it doesn’t have to be. As long as the players see firsthand what the antagonist can do to their characters, this part will add the tension/drama that it should. If you want to have a 1st Pinch Point for each character, then this display of force should directly target the player’s character arc and spark the desire to change through a moral quandary. It’s an awakening. Create tension by ending a session with this pinch point.

The players come across a thieves’ guild run by the evil regime. The rogue takes note of how rich, glamorous, and lawless the life of a criminal is to spark their tragic fall arc. The paladin realizes how deep the corruption of the world runs and sparks their coming of age arc as their innocence starts to fade. The wizard realizes how much resources the evil regime has, and wonders what sorts of power they had in mind for him sparking their corruption arc.

Midpoint

More info is revealed about the antagonist and the perception of the characters change. They have an epiphany and decide to continue onward through their arc. This can, and most likely will, happen at different times for each character and their varying arcs.

The players learn about the leader of the regime. They have been pushed to the breaking point by the regime’s forces. The rogue decides join the regime and start doing crime for the regime and acting as a double agent against the party. The paladin no longer cares about finding someone else to help them stop the regime, vowing to end it themselves. The wizard gets an unholy tome and decides to learn how to make a pact with the demon the regime mentioned to overpower the regime. They are all still heading to the capital, though now with severely divergent goals.

2nd Pinch Point

The antagonist reveals their full power and threatens the completion of the characters’ arcs. The entire party should, in general, be at their lowest moment and completely without hope. This should happen at the same time for everyone. Ideally, end a session with this pinch point to create a cliffhanger and highlight the hopelessness.

The players reach the capital of the evil regime. The rogue is faced with a moral test, where they will be offered riches and allowed to live if they rat out their adventuring party. They choose to take the offer and are betrayed by the regime’s leader and sentenced to death anyway. The paladin comes face to face with the regime’s leader after being ratted out by the rogue. They fail the encounter and barely manage to escape with their life. The wizard is also defeated and their unholy tome is destroyed in the battle. The rogue is imprisoned and the paladin and rogue escape the leader and are being hunted in the capital.

2nd Plot Point

The last piece of the puzzle has come together in the second plot point. The characters finish their arc and learn how to overcome the antagonist. This can happen at different points and doesn’t have to happen quickly. For a tragic character, this is the part where they finally meet their end. Tragic characters fail to change or their change is self-destructive and they fail to overcome the antagonist of the story (tragic, isn’t it?). Think of this part as a moral quandary that characters’ finally “know the answer” to, as far as their character arc is concerned.

The rogue tries to escape, succeeds, but heads back to the thieves’ guild instead of his adventuring allies, and they ultimately betray and kill him. The paladin’s innocence is shattered and they gather rebel forces over time to take on the regime’s leader, becoming a leader themselves. They also find an unlikely ally in the wizard, who has finally succumbed to evil. The wizard still doesn’t know how to summon the demon, but they have already gotten a taste of evil’s power by performing vile rituals on captured regime members and will now use their power for vengeance against the regime’s leader.

Climax

The characters finally face off with the antagonist. The promise set out at the beginning of the campaign is fulfilled. The characters, having completed their arcs, are now changed enough to be able to defeat the antagonist. This should be the players at their most powerful and should be the most epic battle to take place in the campaign.

The paladin’s rebel army and the wizard’s evil magic face off against the evil regime’s leader. The battle is long and epic, but the characters succeed, freeing the kingdom of the evil regime.

Resolution

The game shouldn’t abruptly end after the antagonist is defeated! There needs to be closure. The players’ characters find out the results and the aftermath of defeating the antagonist, for better or for worse. In the case of an ongoing game, you should now set up the next campaign here.

The paladin and wizard regard each other as unsteady allies who no longer have a common enemy. The wizard seeks more power, even seeking to possibly usurp the void of power left from the regime’s defeat. The paladin and their rebel army gather in defiance of the wizard. The paladin tells the wizard to leave the kingdom and not threaten anyone with their evil, else the paladin will smite them down. The wizard, not having many spells left after the battle and not being ready to face an entire army, teleports away to parts unknown with a puff of green smoke. The paladin is placed in power, and the wizard now acts as a looming threat. Perhaps an NPC and villain for the next campaign?


This character arc outline is not cut-and-dry. You should use it as a guide, not a rule. Some characters might abruptly choose to change. Some will reach different parts of the outline at different times or out of order. Some characters might waffle between two sides of their arc before deciding which side they want to be on. But the more you talk to your players about it, the easier it is to come up with a generalized plan for your campaign’s story. Heck, your story might even change from what you initially intended by the end of it (a character with a bad roll can still end up dying before even finishing their arc!) But hopefully this will aid you in making the players love their characters even more and have fun as they grow and change in your campaign’s world. That’s what it’s all about, after all.

The 8 Steps of a CHARACTER ARC

You know that moment as a writer, when you’ve been charging through the story, high on how fantastic it is, and then suddenly…it all STOPS.  The next scene doesn’t form in your head. You’ve got nothing. 

Behind your characters, a string of bright and captivating scenes mark the trail of that rocket of inspiration; ahead of your characters, a foggy expanse, stretching to who-knows-where, a few shapeless blobs that should be scenes floating in the nothingness. The rocket is dead, and not refueling any time soon.

Well, to everybody who’s suffered this, or is currently suffering it, there’s a way to navigate through that fog. A map. Directions and a destination.

Or, more specifically, events that form the underlying structure of the story. 

This post is going to focus on one facet of story structure: character arc. Structure is something people subconsciously recognize and expect, and if the story doesn’t match those expectations, they feel cheated (though usually can’t explain why). Every good story follows a structure. So if you know structure, you’ll always know where to go next, and won’t get lost in the fog. 

So here are the 8 steps of a character arc:

1) Hero: Strength, Weakness, and Need

This happens in the setup of the story, when the main character’s ordinary world is being introduced. First, the main character’s strengths must be displayed; we must be given a reason to like them, or if not exactly “like” them, empathize with them, and be fascinated by them. The reader needs to bond with the character, feel concerned about how it all turns out for them. Or in other words, feel that the main character is worth experiencing the story. There are easy traits that do this: courage, love, humor, being in danger, being unfairly treated, being highly skilled at something, having a powerful noble goal. (Courage is the one they all need. If the character doesn’t have the gumption to actively pursue what they want, they are automatically a background character.) 

After this, still in the beginning of your story, let the character exhibit what needs to change. Show their weaknesses of character and self awareness.
And lastly, hint at what they NEED to learn. Sometimes this is even stated to the character, and they don’t understand it, refuse to believe it, or condemn it. Like “A Christmas Carol”, when Scrooge’s nephew says his speech about Christmas and how wonderful it is, and Scrooge replies “Bah Humbug!" 

2) Desire: This is the moment when the character knows what they need to pursue, in order to obtain what they inwardly want. It is not the inciting incident or catalyst, the event in a story that disrupts the ordinary world and calls the hero on an adventure. This is a separate step entirely, occurring after that catalyst has shattered life as the main character knows it. They believe obtaining this goal will calm whatever inner turmoil or conflict they’re battling. And always, they’re not quite right.
Think of Mr Fredricksen: His goal is to get the house – a  symbolic representation of Ellie and the life he shared with her – to Paradise Falls, which he believes will heal his grief and guilt. It won’t. Once he obtains it, the achievement feels hollow. But I’m getting ahead of myself. So on we go! 

3) Plan: Once in Act Two, the character is going to scramble for a plan of action. The inner want has solidified into a tangible goal, but they need a strategy to achieve it. This also spells out for the reader what to expect in that second act.  

4) Conflict: What’s going to try stopping them? A hero with a goal is one thing, but to make it a story we need something that stands in the way. An obstacle. A force of opposition. If we didn’t have obstacles, books would be as interesting as "Harry Potter and the Trip to the Grocery Store.” (Although honestly, I’d probably read that.) After the catalyst has changed everything, after the character crosses the threshold into Act Two, everything from here on out will be laden with conflict. This is usually when enemies, or more accurately forces of opposition, begin to appear. Everything is accumulating to complicate the main character’s pathway to achieving what they want. The forces of opposition come from not only the villains, but from the actions that have to be taken to achieve the desire. Whatever this action is, it’s exactly what the main character is not suited to do, an action that pressures their flaws, exposes them to exactly what they need to become but can’t right now. 

Like Stitch being forced to be the family dog. He’s not suited to this task.

5) Battle: The forces of opposition are amping up, growing stronger, fighting with greater intensity. The main character is taking the punches and working around them, relentlessly plowing forward. Hero and allies are usually punching back too.

6) Midpoint: This is the event where they first encounter what they need to learn, what they need to become. Something happens that forces them to behave in this new, life-saving way. But once they’ve seen it, they don’t know what to do with this knowledge. 

7) Dark Night, Revelation, Choice:
This is always the darkest point in the story, where all seems lost, and death – of a literal or spiritual nature – is in the air. And in this moment, something usually happens that makes the main character wake up to what is wrong, and what they need. More often than not, this revelation will arrive from the “love story” or relationship of the plot, and will be the thing that helps them pull themselves out of despair and see the light. And once this is uncovered, once the revelation of the truth about themselves is recognized, they are faced with a choice. Of course, they’ve been faced with choices in every beat of every scene, but this is the big choice that is going to determine if their story has a happy ending or a tragic one. The choice is this: “You are being faced the truth that you need to heal. Are you going to choose what you need, let your old self die, and become someone better?” And always, always, always this is a hard choice. The revelation must be significant to them. And it’s never easy. It can’t be. We don’t write stories about heroes who make easy choices. Villains have it easy. Are you going to adopt this new way of living, adopt this truth, and let your old self die? Or are you going to stay the way you are (which feels safer and is much less challenging) but end up stuck in a sort of living death? Most of the time, of course, they choose the right thing. 

This moment is usually always the saddest scene in the thing. Like this scene with Stitch.

8) New Life: This is their changed life. After experiencing the trials of the story, after realizing what they need and choosing to be reborn, they are going to be different people – and are going to live a different life. This is what follows the statement “And every day after …” What has changed? Show the audience how things are different, how things are better, because they want to see that. This is the resolution, the wrapping up of everything we’ve been through with the main character, and having this in the story is often what gives that feeling of satisfaction after seeing a really well-told story. 

So! To show off how this works, I’ve chosen the character arc of Carl from Up. 

1) Hero: Strengths, Weakness, Need

Strengths: Reasons to like Carl are packed into that heartbreaking opening sequence. By the end of it, we love him, love Ellie, and are crying our eyes out.

Weaknesses: Now Carl is curmudgeonly, grumpy, cold, and won’t pay attention to a living soul. He’s also plagued by grief, regret, guilt, and loneliness. (Which we are all 100% okay with, because we already like him.)

Need: He needs Russel. The statement of what he needs to learn isn’t outright said (as it will be later) but Russel represents it. 

Step Two: The catalyst was when a truck knocked down Ellie’s mailbox, Carl hit a construction worker in the head with his cane, and for this a judge declares him a public menace and orders him to go to Shady Oaks Retirement Village. The DESIRE is this moment. 

Carl escapes in a flying house, thousands of balloons lifting him skyward. He even says the desire of the whole story out loud, “So long boys! I’ll send you a postcard from Paradise Falls!” The tangible goal is “live out the rest of his days in his and Ellie’s house, on the edge of Paradise Falls, South America.” (“It’s like America … but South.”)

Step Three: The plan and the conflict overlap, as they are wont to do. We have a scene where Carl is unfurling sails, setting a compass, and settling back in his chair for a smooth journey. But later on, after some conflict has arrived, we have Russel figuring out how to actually make it there. And after even more conflict has arrived, we have him telling Russel “We’re going to walk to the falls quickly and quietly, with no rap music or flash-dancing.”

Step Four: The moment he settles back into his armchair, high above the city, and here’s a knock on the front door, nothing is going to be easy for Carl. First, we have opposition in the form of Russel. Then we have a storm. Then the house lands miles away from the Falls, so they’ll have to walk it. Then we have Kevin, the giant bird. Then we have Dug. Which means they’re also being chased by a legion of talking dogs. Which brings us to Muntz, the main villain, and Carl’s shadow – the representation of Carl’s flaws, and the consequences of refusing to let go of the past. 

Step Five: This is the trek to the Falls. It’s also the battle with every complication that arises. And it’s also exactly what Carl is not suited to do. He’s a curmudgeonly old guy, bent on living out the rest of his life alone. Well, the story says “Nope, Carl, that’s not how it’s going to be” and promptly gives him a surrogate grandson to take care of, a dog who adores him, and even a giant mythical bird. And he has to lead them all, if he’s going to get to the Falls. 

Step Six: The moment when Russel invades Carl’s heart. Which is what he needs, but he doesn’t understand. (I have the scene beated out in the previous post.)

Step Seven: Finally, he gives in to the worst of himself and chooses his goal of living in his broken house on the edge of Paradise Falls. But somehow this doesn’t feel like victory. He’s still alone, next to Ellie’s empty chair, and she is still beyond his reach. 

He picks up her adventure book, and leafs through the photographs, missing her; he pauses on the page scrawled with the words “Stuff I’m Going To Do”, lets his hand rest on it, grief and regret overwhelming him. He begins to close the book, and the page shifts … revealing the edge of another picture. Surprised, he turns the page. It’s their wedding picture.

Ellie added picture after picture of their happy marriage, the whole wonderful life they shared, all the things she did. And on the bottom of the last page is her last message to him: “Thanks for the adventure! Now go have a new one! Love, Ellie.” Exactly what Carl needs. He doesn’t need to be guilty, he doesn’t need to regret the past. The past was beautiful, and she will never truly leave him. 

Choice: So, Carl can make the choice to throw everything out of the house to go save Russel. 

New Life: Sitting on a curb, eating ice cream with Russel.

In the credits, we see a whole new life – or new adventure – with Carl, Russel, Dug, and even a bunch of new puppies.

So, it’s actually pretty simple. And once again, it’s fun to develop your own stories like this, but it’s surprisingly fun to analyze movies and books with it too. It improves your storytelling ability, I’ve found. Practice makes perfect.

I hope this post helps somebody out. It’ll make the ten times I cried while writing it, while watching scenes from Up, worth it.

How do I write?: Dialog

For writers, speaking scenes are either the bane of your existence, or the highlight of your day. On one hand, when characters are talking, it can really help further a scene and help with character development….but on the other hand…writing dialog is such a chore….blugh. So here’s some ways to write better dialog in your stories!

Give Your Characters Voices

Is your character southern? Do they have a lisp? Are they shy? Outspoken? Do they use a lot of big words, or are they an easy talker? Are they more likely to lie with confidence, or do they need to pause a lot to collect their thoughts? These are all factors that help build up a character’s profile, and to add realism to your dialog. Make sure to keep each character consistent – example: if Character A is an angry and resolute character, they wouldn’t stammer or blush when they’re caught off guard – so that your characters keep their individuality.

Embrace the Power of Verbs

Obviously, there’s a huge difference between ‘said’ and ‘yelled’ and ‘screamed’, but there are so many fics where ‘mumbled’ is an overused verb. Unless your character is incredibly shy – or loves to whisper insults under their breath – nobody mumbles every other sentence. ‘Quipped’, ‘snarked,’ ‘said indignantly’, ‘joked’, and ‘laughed’ are some of my favorite verbs.

Moving the Scene Through Dialog 

If you’re ever terrified of having a scene turn into a monotonous he said/she said conversation, then break it up with actions! Have Character A yell at Character B as they angrily slam the car door, or Character C say “huh?” as they try to clear water out of their ears. Here’s a few examples.

  • “You look like crap!” Madison tried to touch the side of her face, but Liz jerked her head back. “Are you like, sick? Your eyes are all red and puffy.”
  • “Yeah, just a second.” Jade watched as the bright orange petals swirled down the drain.
  • Scout visibly recoiled from him. “Uh, no. I’ll pass.”

Talk to Yourself

This is the best trick; it’s what I do when I’m writing dialog. I’ll put on different voices and talk aloud to myself in order to feel what sounds natural and what sounds plastic-y. You may feel ridiculous when you’re up at 2am and repeating the same lines over and over again to yourself, but believe me, it will show in the final drafts when your characters are interacting.

Finally, Have Fun

It’s such a cliche tip that it makes me want to cry from boredom, but having fun with your dialog makes it infinitely easier to write. If your inspiration is just bone dry, have your characters get silly with their dialog – “Sir, that really hella dangerous experiment is going critical” “oh dang, lmao, we should probably leave?” “yes most definitely” – because even then, you’re getting your ideas out and you can come back later. Also, it’s hilarious. In the end, writing is supposed to be a fun hobby, so find what works for you and keep on doing it!

Three Types of Act 1 Closers

1…Big, full-cast musical spectacles where the musical motifs converge and signify a turning point in the characters’ journeys

2…A riveting, show-stopping solo by the main character where they make a life-changing resolution

3…Six minutes of cannibal puns

One day, I hope I’ll be able to write exposition half as good as this…

  • What she says: I'm fine.
  • What she means: I've seen Wonder Woman twice now and I still think that Ares should've been Doctor Poison herself Isabel Maru because her character was consistently and noticeably integral to the plot, creating the most destructive weapon that mankind had ever seen, assisting Ludendorff and strengthening him to superhuman levels; Diana at one point is overcome by rage and becomes destructive so it is completely within believability that the rage of a woman i.e. Doctor Isabel Maru could be the rage of a war god, there is never any concrete resolution for her character because we don't know if she somehow survives that final battle or dies, and for such an important antagonist this feels like a complete loose end whereas when Ares was revealed I didn't even know the character's name until the second time I watched it and when he showed up onscreen the first time my only thought was "whomst?"
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[HIGH RESOLUTION]  Beauty and the Beast characters (Ending Credits) - Part 1/2

I repost these images but this time with high resolution (so you can use them as wallpapers, headers, backgrounds, etc. if you want :))

 Here you can find the same screenshots but with small resolution.

2

I’d like to play an ‘every man’ role. I don’t have to play a hero with a lot of action sequences. I’d love to play a character in a film that you watch more than once because you feel like you have to watch again – because you want to relive experience. I love ‘It’s A Wonderful Life.’ I love the message, I love the acting, and by the end of the movie, I’m ready to watch it again. ‘Boogie Nights’ is another film I love to watch. I want to be a part of role that takes you on a ride, where you can totally relate to the characters and experience the conflict and the resolution.

The Sims 4 Parenthood: Cheat Sheet Master List by TwistedMexi

 TwistedMexi has published a Sims 4 Parenthood Master Cheat List! Check it out!

Please note testingcheats must be turned on for these cheats to work.

Parenting Skill

Change the level of skill for your Parenting capabilities.
Valid values are 1 through 10.

  • stats.set_skill_level AdultMajor_Parenting <value> 

Curfew Cheat

Quickly change the curfew of the current household with this cheat.
Valid values for <time> are 19, 21, and 23. (7PM, 9PM, and 11PM respectively)

  • curfew.set_curfew <time> 

Character Value Cheats

These cheats will let you set your sims character values, -100 for completely negative, and 100 for completely positive.
0 is neutral.
<value> should be a value between -100 and 100.

  • Empathy - stats.set_stat lifeSkillStatistic_Empathy <value>
  • Manners - stats.set_stat lifeSkillStatistic_Manners <value>
  • Responsibility - stats.set_stat lifeSkillStatistic_Responsibility <value>
  • Conflict Resolution - stats.set_stat lifeSkillStatistic_ConflictResolution <value>
  • Emotional Control - stats.set_stat lifeSkillStatistic_EmotionalControl <value>

Character Trait Cheats

These cheats are for the traits that are normally rewarded for having a certain character value. Opposite traits can not be added at the same time, and you may use traits.remove_trait to remove the existing trait if you wish to add the other one.

  • Good Manners - traits.equip_trait GoodManners
  • Bad Manners - traits.equip_trait BadManners
  • Responsible - traits.equip_trait LifeSkills_Responsible
  • Irresponsible - traits.equip_trait Irresponsible
  • Mediator - traits.equip_trait Mediator
  • Argumentative - traits.equip_trait Argumentative
  • Compassionate - traits.equip_trait Compassionate
  • Insensitive - traits.equip_trait LifeSkills_Unfeeling
  • Emotional Control- traits.equip_trait EmotionalControl
  • Uncontrolled - traits.equip_trait Uncontrolled

Childhood Phase Traits

These cheats are for the traits that are normally part of the childhood phases system. Conflicting traits can not be added at the same time, and you may use traits.remove_trait to remove the existing trait if you wish to add the other one.

  • Picky Eater A - traits.equip_trait ChildhoodPhase_PickyEater_A
  • Picky Eater B - traits.equip_trait childhoodphase_PickyEater_B
  • Picky Eater C - traits.equip_trait childhoodphase_PickyEater_C
  • Picky Eater D - traits.equip_trait childhoodphase_PickyEater_D
  • Picky Eater E - traits.equip_trait childhoodphase_PickyEater_DisgustedByFood
  • Clingy - traits.equip_trait ChildhoodPhase_Clingy 
  • Picky Eater F - traits.equip_trait childhoodphase_PickyEater_F
  • Loud - traits.equip_trait ChildhoodPhase_Loud
  • Rebellious - traits.equip_trait ChildhoodPhase_Rebellious
  • Mean Streak - traits.equip_trait ChildhoodPhase_MeanStreak
  • Bear - traits.equip_trait ChildhoodPhase_Bear
  • Distant - traits.equip_trait ChildhoodPhase_Distant

anonymous asked:

Do you have any tips for writing short stories?

After three years and a degree in creative writing where 95% of the time we wrote short stories, I’m sorry to report that they are still the bane of my existence. I can never seen to focus in on one idea for so short of time; once I have a plot, I want to expand it, to see it grow, to find all its intricacies and stretch it out for a 60k+ word novel. But in truth, short stories are not so very different from novels except that they generally should stick with one plot rather than have one over arching plot and several sub plots woven in. They still need a strong character, still need rising action, resolution, still need to grasp a reader’s attention from the first sentence. 

Here are some resources I hope will help:

In my experience, I find it easiest to write short stories if I am focused on a single scene. For example “this is the story of what happened during one traffic jam.” Many interesting things can happen here, but perhaps not enough to fill a novel. If I am stuck with one location and one short burst of time, I am forced to really hone in on that one story, and this helps to fight off my instinct to tell 10 stories at once.

You may also want to check out these links:

Restarting This Tumblr. Win A Cintiq!

Hi guys,

As some of you may be aware I used to use this tumblr a lot to collate channel art for my channel and I have decided to reboot it and try and get some good thumbnails for my channel again.

Basically any art submitted from now until the end of February will enter you to win some prizes. TWO runners up will win a small Wacom art tablet  (similar to this but may not be the exact model https://www.amazon.co.uk/Wacom-Intuos-Draw-Graphics-Tablet/dp/B013ATUR46/ref=sr_1_1?s=computers&ie=UTF8&qid=1486307698&sr=1-1&keywords=wacom+tablet )

The winner will also win a Cintiq 13inch HD (https://www.amazon.co.uk/d/Shops/Wacom-Cintiq-Interactive-Display-English-language-version/B00BSVADDY/ref=sr_1_fkmr1_1?s=computers&ie=UTF8&qid=1486307854&sr=1-1-fkmr1&keywords=cintiq+13inch+hd ) worth a considerable amount.

To have a chance of winning simply submit a thumbnail for one of the following games with the folllowing criteria by hitting the “submit art” button on this tumblr. 

You must be 18 or older - Include your country of residence with the submission (where you want the prize posted to but NOT your full address)

Must be 1280x720 resolution. 

Must feature the “Minx” character (simply look at my channel for reference)

Must be Digital Art

Please leave a blank space for game name / logo

Titlecards in the following themes are accepted: Uno , Cards Against Humanity,  Dead By Daylight, Friday The 13th, Prop Hunt, Golf Games (keep it generic), Town of Salem, A “scared” minx on a transparent background, TTT, Age Of Conan, A transparent background RAGE MINX face.

By submitting your art here you give me (Minx) full permission to use it in whatever context she wishes wherever she wishes.

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IMPORTANT

I am also looking to take on two artists on a permanent basis for paid work for the channel. This will be unrelated to the competition because I realize not everyone wants to commit to making art for me. If you are interested please mark your post with “Interested in paid position” . I’d be looking at a set amount of art for a flat lump sum.

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You can submit as many thumbnails you like in the period.

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Contest ends March 1st and winner(s) will be picked within two weeks, and aim to get their prizes to them by April 1st at the latest.


Best Regards,

Minx

lover-fighter-writer-nerd  asked:

The more i write, the more i realizehow much i love world building and character development. My problem is i cant come up with a good plot to save my life. Any advice?! Please help!

Plot is where I also fall down. I’m not even so much about the world building, I just love characters and how people interact, so I have to actively force myself to write plot.

The way I do it is to break it up into really, really simple things. I think I’ve posted how I structure my novel plans, but this is basically it:

(Sorry for all the blanks, but there’s no way in hell I am letting key plot elements out)

Now, if you’re thinking, but Joy, that’s just a scrap of paper with single descriptor lines numbered together, yes, you’d be correct. I cannot map out plot in any other way, I’ve tried, but this is how my brain apparently works. 

All I know is I need to get from A to Z and I know there are scenes I want to include, so I write the scenes, then fit out where in the alphabet of my novel they fit. I number them, and then I fill in the blanks and connect everything together so that the start, the middle, the catalyst and the resolution all meet up, and then once I have this vague road map of where I’m going, I try and stick to it as much as possible while I write the thing into a whole. Sometimes the plan changes, and that’s okay, but mostly it gives me a sense of direction with where I am going towards something.

I like having my Point of Conflict mapped out clearly, so that I know where I am heading. And I’ll be honest, my plot is not unique. There is a start, a source of conflict, some comedic and romantic relief in between with oodles of world and character development until there is A Not Good Thing Which Causes More Conflict, and then there is The Resolution followed by more Character Stuff.

And that’s it. That is how I write and god help you if you can figure it out because some days I barely can. I guess the point I am making is, your plot doesn’t need to be complex. What’s the theme of your story, how does it start? Write that down as a one liner. What happens next? Write that down.

To give you an idea of how that would look, for most coming of age fantasy novels, it would look like this:

>Be at home on farm. Lament life on farm.
>Visit Market with Friends.
>Get into hijinks which establish Character Dynamics.
>Hear a rumor at market about war, be certain it will never come to you.
>Wake up in middle of night to find farm on fire, the war is here and it has most definitely found you.
>Parents die, run off with pseud-parental figure who seems to know a lot about you.
>Realize adventuring is fucking awful.
>Discover you were adopted and feel confused/betrayed??? 
>Get in fight with dark ancient evil that tells you Things.
>Lose hand as a metaphor for lost innocence.
>Several thousand words later:
>APPARENTLY YOU ARE KING NOW SO GOOD LUCK WITH THAT

And that is…that’s pretty much every popular fantasy story since Tolkein. But it’s the worlds and characters that keep us coming back for more. So your plot? Your plot doesn’t need to be original, there is at this stage, no new ideas. Only interesting and well executed ones, and that’s what you want to aim for. 

So don’t stress over things just yet. Get yourself a vague map, and then see where it takes you. Not everyone knows where they are going when they start out writing. 

The 3rd to last episode of a season is always a set up episode both in terms of characters and plot

There is rarely key emotional payoff for the main character/characters because they need the resolution to happen in the final 2 episodes


As a result, the bellarke in this episode was deeply emotional but it felt incredibly unfinished because they need it to happen in the final few episodes

I’ve seen many people complaining about the lack of a conversation after the gun scene but that’s happening next episode, because these two have reached the point of no return. The narrative confirmed to us tonight that Clarke would choose Bellamy over the human race and her sobs during that gun scene points to a shocking realization that with only 24 hours remaining before the Death Wave can not go unspoken