as a pinoy

Welcome to the A Court of Thorns and Roses fandom

Welcome to the ACOTAR fandom where the name is to long that we don’t bother saying it all, where you regret your old ships, where we laugh over wingspans, we think of the first book as a prologue and we struggle to pronounce our favourite characters names. Enjoy your stay.

What’s happening in Marawi City is an emergency and a tragedy but PLEASE avoid calling them ISIS fighters. They are part of the Maute Group, an Islamist group that has pledged allegiance to ISIS and Abu Bakr.

Calling them ISIS fighters would make many people think that foreign terrorists have made their way into the Philippines, making this seem like an issue of international security instead of domestic/regional. What that does is put the Philippines at further risk of imperialist intervention in this era of the global ‘war on terror’.

So please avoid rhetoric that plays into imperialist hysteria, because if there’s one thing that will make this situation a whole lot worse, it will be a whole bunch of Westerners calling for Western powers to come ‘save’ the Phillipines.

Salamat sa lahat 

A guide to pretending you speak Tagalog/Filipino

1. Add “’di ba?” (right?/innit?) to the end of your sentences.

2. Replace “really”/”very” with “talagang” or the question “Really?” with “talaga.”

3. Sprinkle a dash of “kasi” (because, or the “that’s why” that you add to the end of a sentence instead of saying “because.”)

You didn’t ask for directions, that’s why kasi.


4. Use Google Translate to find the most obscure word for what you’re trying to say. Deep Tagalog points.

You’re hair is so marilag and maluwalhati today.

Instagram: @iamkimberlyt

My hair isn’t perfectly curly.
My jeans don’t hug my butt.
I don’t wear fake nails.
I don’t wear makeup everyday.
I have shirts I still wear from middle school.
I still will wear my highschool sweats and sweatshirts….. at the same time.
I don’t fit under the label cool and trendy.
And I’m okay with that.

Love yourself 💘

Growing up as a Filipino kid in America who loved reading comic books, I didn’t see original, leading Asian (especially Filipino) superheroes in the mainstream. When you don’t see yourself or your experiences reflected in heroes in pop culture, it’s damaging. Now that I’m older and see that not much has changed, I realize how important it is to create narratives for the underrepresented, especially the next generation of kids who don’t feel like they belong. In honor of Asian-American & Pacific Islander Heritage month, here is what I imagine a mainstream Filipino superhero in America might look like.

I notice everything. And by everything. I literally mean everything. I notice when someone stops hitting me up like they used to. I notice when the way someone talks to me starts changing. I notice the little things that people do, and the little things they used to do. I notice when things changed, and when it’s no longer the same. I notice every single detail. I just don’t say anything.