arts students league

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The Art Students League – 30x30, restaurant, no cc

This is basically a big, simple block of sim-bricks, hosting an art school for my sims and a small restaurant with a bar and karaoke/bubble blower corner.
Some areas are decorated, some less, some barely xD.

Gameplay tip – I’ve noticed NPCs/townies getting unhealthily obsessed with workbenches, so if you want your sims to get decent service at the restaurant, better remove the door to the “sculpture” studio beforehand, adding it only when needed.

Better placed with MOO on (bb.moveobjects on) – otherwise one of the columns goes missing (EDIT: and some wall deco, as seen in my preview pics).

DLCs used: City Living, Get to Work, Dine Out, Get Together, Outdoor Retreat (plants, rugs and some clutter), Perfect Patio Stuff (exterior wall deco and a sculpture), Cool Kitchen Stuff (posters), Movie Hangout Stuff (a puff/chair) and Backyard Stuff (just the lemons clutter object thingy)

The Art Students League is on the Gallery tagged with #simmingstuff.
Or you can download the tray files clicking below (unzip and place in your Tray only the files from the “tray files” folder):

download

Yet another illustration for the Post section of the Brown Daily Herald, for an article in which the “writer talks about problems with the narrative of sweeping all the Ivy Leagues, the way in which the myth of elite schools is constructed, and extends this phenomenon to other recent events in pop culture.”

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So here’s a speedpaint of the bros. I’ve been working on a college AU

In her biography, Emma Lazarus, Esther Schor traces the multi-faceted life of the woman who gave memorable voice to the American promise: her childhood in a large, Sephardic Jewish family; her friendship with Ralph Waldo Emerson; her literary criticism and translations from the German; her poems satirizing and excoriating anti-Semitism; her activism on behalf of the refugees arriving at New York in the early 1880s (sometimes two thousand per month), not only writing on their behalf but visiting with them and fighting for their access to education and employment. The passage below finds Emma on a trip to Europe–where she meets James Russell Lowell and Robert Browning, among others—just months before she returns to American and, for the first time in her life, sails into New York Harbor.

Excerpt from Emma Lazarus

    In May 1883, while Emma was taking tea with London literati, Chase and his fellow painter J. Carroll Beckwith, both instructors at the Art Students League, agreed to curate an exhibition. The goal was to raise funds toward a pedestal for Frédéric-Auguste Bartholdi’s monumental Liberty Enlightening the World, a gift from the people of France to the United States. The brainchild of the liberal French statesman Laboulaye, the statue was an attempt to subvert the royalist image of France under Napoleon III, showing instead a republican face for the world to admire. Laboulaye, a historian and admirer of the United States, calculated that the statue would be more welcome in an American harbor than in a French one, but to most Americans the statue seemed a very French affair. Congress quailed at a gift that imposed a huge financial burden, agreeing in 1877 to fund only the erection of the statue, its maintenance, and an unveiling ceremony—without alcohol. By 1883, Richard Morris Hunt’s pedestal on Bedloe’s Island was already half complete; in Paris, the statue was ready to ship. But theatrical, musical, and sporting benefits, not to mention direct appeals to Gilded Age captains of industry and grandes dames, had yielded only two fifths of the required funds. Even the raised hand of Liberty, planted in Madison Square Park after its debut at the Centennial Exhibition in Philadelphia, drew more ridicule than cash. As Montague Marks, editor of the Art Amateur magazine (and later the husband of Emma’s sister Agnes), put it, “The torch in the hand of the absent goddess suggests the idea of an immense double tooth which has just been extracted from some unfortunate mastodon, and is held aloft in triumph by the successful operator… .”

    Emma Lazarus had never visited the workshop of Bartholdi in Paris; except for the torch, she had only glimpsed the statue in photographs. But she was one of two poets to whom the writer Constance Cary Harrison turned in assembling a portfolio of writings and sketches to be sold at the exhibition. Years later, Harrison recalled:

    I begged Miss Lazarus to give me some verses appropriate to the occasion. She was at first inclined to rebel against writing anything “To order” as it were, and rather mischievously let play the summer-lightning of her sarcasm upon her friend, “the Portfolio fiend,” and the enterprise in general. “Besides,” she added, “if I attempt anything now, under the circumstances, it will assuredly be flat.” “Think of that Goddess standing on her pedestal down yonder in the bay, and holding her torch out to those Russian refugees of yours you are so fond of visiting at Ward’s Island,” I suggested. The shaft sped home—her dark eyes deepened—her cheek flushed—the time for merriment was passed—she said not a word more, then.

    Like Stedman’s recollection of persuading Emma to write about the Jews, Harrison’s memoir was written years after the fact. As hard as it is to trust the veracity of either memoir, it is unwise to dismiss them; Emma Lazarus thrived on a joining of supple minds, whether in conversation and correspondence or in the acts of translation and criticism. Whatever Harrison’s role in linking the statue to the refugees, it was the sonnet itself that transformed Liberty Enlightening the World into a new sort of colossus altogether.

     Not like the brazen giant of Greek fame,
     With conquering limbs astride from land to land;
     Here at our sea-washed, sunset gates shall stand
     A mighty woman with a torch, whose flame
     Is the imprisoned lightning, and her name
     Mother of Exiles. From her beacon-hand
     Glows world-wide welcome; her mild eyes command
     The air-bridged harbor that twin cities frame.

     “Shall stand”—only this future verb, now that both sonnet and statue have hardened into institutions, reminds us that these were once words of prophecy.

More on this book and author:

flickr

Katherine H. Wagenhals - The Visitor [1916] by Gandalf’s Gallery

<br /><i>Via Flickr:</i>
<br />A Pennsylvania native, Katherine Wagenhals (1883 - 1966) studied at Smith College and at the Art Students League in New York and at the Académie Moderne in Paris before making her way to Fort Wayne, Indiana. There she may have taught t the Fort Wayne School of Art with her talented relatives the printmakers Jessie and Norah Hamilton.

This prim lady in a blue suit and rather assertive bonnet won Wagenhals the Art Association of Indianapolis Purchase Prize in 1916. Although the genteel setting falls within the tradition of interiors painted by the Boston School artists, the thick, simple strokes used to suggest the visitor’s hands show Wagenhals’ familiarity with bolder painting styles. The tidy background of straight lines and 90 degree angles reinforces the impression of propriety. If not for the sitter’s intelligent expression and alert bearing, the door in the background might be interpreted as a symbol of a highly desired departure rather than a welcome arrival.

[Indianapolis Museum of Art - Oil on canvas, 66.4 x 51.1 cm]

Will Eisner and the modern comic

For @hansbekhart and other aficionados of Steve Rogers and history, how about a look at one of Steve’s historic contemporaries–Will Eisner, one of the essential men behind modern comics.

Eisner grew up in Brooklyn, and he was born March 6, 1917 (a few days before Bucky Barnes, for an amusing coincidence) and went to Dewitt Clinton High School, along with Bob Kane, of Batman fame. Then studied for a year at the Art Student League of New York, and then became a newspaper cartoonist, with a sideline in illustrations for pulp magazine stories at $10 a page (more economic background for Steve!). He did pass up a chance to draw Tijuana bibles for $3 a page. He and Jerry Iger then started a company which was one of the first comic book packagers. In late 1939 (he was 22) he was offered the deal that lead to his most famous creation, The Spirit. The rest is comics history.

Jack Kirby, whose name should be blessed by the fans of Captain America, was also born in 1917, on August 28. He bounced off both the art program at the Educational Alliance and the Pratt Institute. By 1936, he was working as a cartoonist for the Lincoln Newspaper Syndicate.

Bob Kane was born October 24, 1915, and went from DeWitt Clinton High School to Cooper Union, and then worked as an animator at the Max Fleischer Studios, and like Jack Kirby, later worked for Eisner and Iger.

It’s possible Steve Rogers became involved with more serious aspects of the 1930s New York art scene, or worked for the WPA art programs. But it would also be likely for him to know, and perhaps submit work to the same places as Eisner, Kane, Kirby, and his other contemporaries.

I suspect he’d have had the same inner struggle over the Tijuana bibles Eisner did.

A Moment of Leisure (1890). Ernest Lee Major (American, 1864-1950). Oil on canvas. 

Major first studied under E. C. Messer at the Corcoran Gallery of Art, then at the Art Students League of New York with William Merritt Chase. A Harper Hargarten Prize let him travel to Europe, where he studied under Gustave Boulanger and Jules Joseph Lefebvre.

flickr

Katherine H. Wagenhals - The Visitor [1916] by Gandalf
Via Flickr:
A Pennsylvania native, Katherine Wagenhals (1883 - 1966) studied at Smith College and at the Art Students League in New York and at the Académie Moderne in Paris before making her way to Fort Wayne, Indiana. There she may have taught t the Fort Wayne School of Art with her talented relatives the printmakers Jessie and Norah Hamilton.

This prim lady in a blue suit and rather assertive bonnet won Wagenhals the Art Association of Indianapolis Purchase Prize in 1916. Although the genteel setting falls within the tradition of interiors painted by the Boston School artists, the thick, simple strokes used to suggest the visitor’s hands show Wagenhals’ familiarity with bolder painting styles. The tidy background of straight lines and 90 degree angles reinforces the impression of propriety. If not for the sitter’s intelligent expression and alert bearing, the door in the background might be interpreted as a symbol of a highly desired departure rather than a welcome arrival.

[Indianapolis Museum of Art - Oil on canvas, 66.4 x 51.1 cm]

Merlin reading. Color plate from King Arthur and His Knights. Elizabeth Lodor Merchant. Published by Winston, 1927. Illustration by Frank Godwin. 

Studying in New York at the Art Students League, Godwin became friends with James Montgomery Flagg and two shared a studio together. Godwin was influenced by Flagg and Charles Dana Gibson, and reflections of both can be seen in Godwin’s work.

Black Inventors Day 13

John Thompson - Born 1959 John Thompson invented lingo programming used in Macromedia Director and Shockwave. According John Thompson, “Lingo is a scripting language in the Macromedia Director authoring tool. The content created with Macromedia Director is delivered on the World Wide Web as shockwave movies.

Thompson studied art at the New York Student Art League and the Boston Museum School and earned a degree in Computer Science and Visual Studies from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the 1983. By combining these two seemingly disparate disciplines, Thompson wanted to bridge the gap between art and technology. Four years later as a chief scientist at Macromedia™, he was able to make progress towards this goal. He developed a number of products, many of them based on his most famous invention, Lingo programming: a scripting language that helps render visuals in computer programs. Thompson used Lingo in one of his better-known computer inventions, Macromedia™ Director. Macromedia™ Director is able to incorporate different graphic formats (such as BMP, AVI, JPEG, QuickTime, PNG, RealVideo and vector graphics) to create multi-media content and applications, thus combining computer programming language with visual art.

Lingo is now used with many programs that have interactive simulations with graphics, animation, sound, and video. Along with Macromedia™ Director, Thompson has helped develop MediaMaker, Actions, VideoWorks Accelerator, and Video Works II. Lingo has also been used to create flash and shockwave programs that now are prevalent in video games, web design, animation, and graphics.

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Ernest Lawson (1873 – 1939) studied at the Art Students League, New York, with J. Alden Weir and John Twachtman, and later in Paris at the Académie Julien. Upon his return to the United States he produced his famous impressionistic urban landscapes that linked him to the Ashcan school.

Inktober Day 11 – Transport

In this case, public transport. The year is 1937 or 38. Steve is taking night classes at the Art Students League in Manhattan. Every once in awhile Bucky will show up at the end of Steve’s classes and they ride the subway together back to Brooklyn. Bucky falls asleep, or at least appears so. Somehow he still manages to murmur something silly that only Steve can hear. 


day 1, day 2, day 3, day 4 , day 5 , day 6, day 7, day 8, day 9, day 10

day 11

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BMW Art Car #3: Roy Lichtenstein 320i 1977. 

In 1977, Roy Lichtenstein designed the third vehicle in the BMW Art Car Collection, a BMW 320 Group 5. The colourful, vibrant Pop-art landscape reflects his famous comic strip style in the paintwork, the surroundings flashing by depicting the driver’s view from the moving racing car. 

“I pondered on it for a long time and put as much into it as I possibly could. I wanted the lines I painted to be a depiction the road showing the car where to go. The design also shows the countryside through which the car has travelled. One could call it an enumeration of everything a car experiences – only that this car reflects all of these things before actually having been on a road,” said Roy Lichtenstein commenting on his design of the BMW 320i.

Roy Lichtenstein, who was born in New York in 1923, is considered to be one of the founders of American pop art. Until 1938 he painted portraits of jazz musicians, attended the “Art Students League”, finally studying art in Ohio. His earlier works range from cubism to expressionism. He did not become interested in trivial culture such as comics and advertising until the late fifties. His pop art paintings were created in 1961. These were followed by caricatures of the “American way of life”, experiments with well-known works of art, sculptures and films. He died in New York in 1997.

Roy Lichtenstein – The BMW 320 group 5 racing version

  •  four-cylinder in-line engine
  • 4 valves per cylinder
  •  twin overhead camshafts
  • displacement: 1999 cm³
  • power output: 300 bhp
  • top speed: 290 km/h 

After its completion, Roy Lichtenstein’s Art Car was able to celebrate its premiere twice – as a work of art at the Centre Pompidou in Paris and as a racing car in the 24-hour race at Le Mans in June 1977. The car was driven by Hervé Poulain and Marcel Mignot from France. The car with the number 50 achieved a ninth place in the overall rating and finished first in its class.

Robert Lewis Reid (American artist, 1862-1939) Pond Lilies

Robert Lewis Reid (1862-1939), was born in Massachusetts. He attended the School of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston; in 1884 he moved to New York to study at the Art Students League, and a year later he sailed for Paris to study at the Julian Academy, returning to New York in 1889.

Women Dancing (Dance of the Forest Nymphs)

Warren B. Davis


Bio from 1st Dibs “Warren B. Davis (1865–1928) is an American painter and illustrator known for his dry-point etchings and tempera paintings of idealized young women. Davis studied at the Art Students League in New York and is often compared to similar artists of his time, N.C. Wyeth and Maxfield Parrish.

His commercial work include illustrations for Vanity Fair, Life Magazine, and The Ladies World.

Now his work can be seen at The Richter Gallery in Bellows Falls, Vermont and at the Cleveland Museum of Art”