artistic careers

10

The Miniatures of Joshua Smith 

Joshua Smith is a miniaturist and former stencil artist based in Norwood, South Australia. With a career spanning 17 years he has showcased his work in London, Paris, Berlin, New York, Japan and all over Australia in over 100 exhibitions. Formerly a self taught stencil artist Josh refocused his career to establishing Espionage Gallery, an Art Gallery based in Adelaide, South Australia showcasing both emerging and well established local, interstate and international artists. For 4 years he showcased over 600 artists from over 20 countries.

In 2015 after the closure of Espionage Gallery Josh refocused back onto his own career this time as a self taught miniaturist. His miniature works primarily focus on the often overlooked aspects of the urban environment such as grime, rust, decay to discarded cigarettes and graffiti perfectly recreated in 1:20 scale miniatures.

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  • Me: wow this landscape is gorgeous where is this i wish I could go th...
  • Me: *squints*
  • Me: this is a video game isn't it

So I’ve recently gotten into this show called Dirk Gently’s Holistic Detective Agency (a mouthful, but it’s worth it).

I can’t even properly describe how much I love the character of Dirk Gently in this, how much I relate to him on personal levels. I see so much of myself in him, in how he acts and behaves, and how other people react to him, and the things he says, and I just get him, because in a lot of ways I am him, or very much like him. (In like, a metaphorical way, not a literal “oh my god I’m going to change my name to Dirk” way.)

It’s also made me a huge fan of Samuel Barnett.

So here’s something I’ve been working on for the past two days!

headcanon that a modern!R is a stage set designer 

Okay, hear me out. I always see headcanons for him being an artist, or photographer, and careers along those lines, but what if he was a set designer? And strictly for stage plays and musicals. 

  • He’ll paint the backdrops himself, and enlists “starving artist” college kids to help him make the sets and, to a certain extent, design some props, instead of bringing in sixty year old know it alls.
  • He’s really good at graphic design so he works closely with lighting directors to make incredible digital art and shade the sets to the mood of the scene. 
  • He loves to create sets for revivals because he can take what has already been done and put a modern twist on it. Stays true to what the original designer wanted, while putting his own personality in. 
  • The best sets are the simplest sets. He’s minimalistic regarding the amount of pieces in the show, but puts in an incredible amount of detail and work into every single one. 
  • He’s probably gotten fired once or twice for sneaking in a bottle of wine on set. Probably also quit because companies wouldn’t let him pay the college kids who’s help he wants to enlist. 
  • Ah maybe he meets Jehan while working on a revival of Romeo and Juliet on the west end. Jehan’s playing Benvolio and suggests R “uses red carnation’s on Juliet’s balcony because they’re flowers of love.”
  • Bahorel works as a crew member for the company. The two convince him to join their group of merry men at a local cafe. 
  • Maybe Enj is one of the actors and just so happens to have angelic vocals but that could just be slander 

Victuuri Week // Day 1 // AU: A Different Career - The Artist & The Barista

I can totally imagine Victor as an artist (wanted to add tattoos, but I suck at drawing, so maybe whenever I get more free time to do them properly) and Yuuri as a drawing hobbyist/barista, one day out of the counter and the poor soul gets the foreigners’ attention. Imagine the kid getting on eros mode lol ∠( ᐛ 」∠)_

I’m so sorry for joining so late, I better run if I want to catch up with everyone.

Edit: The idea was referenced from one of Viria’s drawings. In a rush, I forgot to post it before, thankfully an anon reminded me. I’m so embarrassed ( ´△`)

Dealing with Artistic Burnout

Artistic burnout is a problem many artists experience at some point in their career. If you’ve never experienced it, then consider yourself lucky. But if you have, I wanted to talk a little bit about it as someone who has been there.

Let’s be honest, art is a pretty awesome career. We’re extremely fortunate to get paid to do something we really love. It’s a wonderful thing to be able to turn a hobby into a career, and something I am truly grateful for. But like any career, sometimes it’s stressful and difficult, and it requires a lot of effort. It can be frustrating when that thing you used to do for fun in your free time becomes the thing that is causing you stress. It’s the one unfortunate side effect of turning your hobby into your job. Sometimes you’re just not going to enjoy it.

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Neil Tennant of The Pet Shop Boys coined the term “imperial phase” in reference to that point in an artist’s career when they have completely captured the zeitgeist and can do practically nothing wrong. 

Being familiar the concept of the “imperial phase” makes Coldplay’s 2008 song “Viva La Vida” (but especially Lady Gaga’s cover of it) all the more interesting.

Although I know very little of Coldplay, I do know that “Viva La Vida” was released well into the band’s career and biggest successes. The song contains many biblical references and looks back to a time when the narrator “ruled the world”. It’s not a stretch of the imagination to consider that the song may be a reflection upon Coldplay’s own “imperial period”, which lasted sometime around the worldwide success of the single “Yellow” and the release of their 2005 album “X&Y”.

What makes Gaga’s cover of this song most interesting is that she covered it in 2008, shortly after the release of “The Fame”. Gaga’s “imperial” period lasted from this time until the release of “Born This Way” in early 2011.

Gaga’s cover of “Viva La Vida” is in my opinion more musically interesting than Coldplay’s. It’s a live cover, and in the original unedited version she laughs and fumbles with the lyrics several times. It is truly the mark of an “imperial phase” that Gaga could be so charming and interesting even while screwing up the lyrics of a just-released hit. 

It is now 2015 and Gaga’s imperial phase has come and gone. Her career suffered from overexposure and a severe case of hubris, leading to bad press and sliding record sales. Public opinion has changed as of late, and her career seems to be on the upswing, but it will never be the same as that time when she was talked about in every newspaper, beloved by hipsters and teenyboppers, and copied by every girl in the pop world. Gaga’s imperial phase was truly a special moment in time.

Now, for some personal reflection.

I was turning 18 when “Viva La Vida” and “The Fame” were released, and just entering university. I finally felt free to be myself and express who I was: a weird, artsy girl with a lot of opinions and crazy outfits. I also learned just how much I loved partying. I finally had friends! And we all loved Gaga. We went out every night and still made it to class. We got dressed together. We fell asleep on each other’s couches. My life felt truly… fabulous. Gaga and I shared the same imperial phase.

Now, as a post-grad in a university town, I feel much like the narrator of “Viva La Vida”. I remember when the world was mine to conquer, but now I just serve the university students and their friends, trying to scrape by while they party. I can still remember when my friends and I would shut down the clubs. There’s a pretty sad story behind the rise and fall of my imperial phase, but it’s better not to go into it.

When Lady Gaga ruled the world, I felt like I did too. Here’s hoping we both have a comeback.

Occupations Masterlist:

The Music Industry~

OKAY, so under this cut you’ll find a list of #55 jobs your characters can hold in the music industry aside from classic band members/solo artists. I know for bandom RP especially it can be hard to come up with unique jobs for OCs that still enable them to create connections. I’ve organized everything into categories for easy searching and defined even the most intuitive titles, so hopefully this helps!

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4

Artists in Action!

Meet Brian Morante, one of the very talented storyboard artists on SpongeBob SquarePants! Brian has called Nick a creative home for many years, working as an artist on Monsters vs. Aliens and Breadwinners, and teaming with @nickanimatedshorts to create Earmouse and Bottle

Read on to find out how he got started in animation and what inspires him to keep going!

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1) What is your role here at NAS? How long have you worked here?
I’m a storyboard artist on Spongebob SquarePants. I am going into my 6th year at Nick. I started out as a storyboard revisionist on Penguins of Madagascar.

2) How did you get started in Animation?
I’m mostly self taught. I drew a ton, made my own animated shorts and comics, and collected a phat stack of rejection letters from animation studios all around town for years. Eventually my stuff was up to par and I applied to Nickelodeon. The timing and my talent finally matched up, and I got my first job.

3) What is your day-to-day like? Any interesting routines?
I get in and I get a big cup of water and read the news (and the entire internet) to make sure the world still exists. And then I read through the script pages I want to get done for the day (I usually shoot for completing one page per day). I’ll sketch out little thumbnails on the script page and come up with gags or funny ways to play things out. Then I wring my hands about whether or not I’ll finish on time. Flesh out my thumbnails on the computer and hopefully make them funnier. Then wring my hands about whether anything I’ve done is good enough. Talk myself off the ledge and continue. And then there’s lunch with friends somewhere in there.

4) What continues to motivate you to be an artist and work in animation?
It’s a demanding job but it is very fun. And it’s the only thing I’m actually good at. So short answer is: fun and homelessness.

5)    What are the favorite parts of your job?
I have the freedom to go off script and come up with my own gags or funny lines. I love creating that stuff. On a good day storyboarding feels like what it felt like to play with toys when you were a kid. Also, working around so many talented, funny people.

6) Tell us about a project or accomplishment that you consider to be the most significant in your career.
A couple years ago I got the opportunity to make a short I pitched to the Nickelodeon Animated Shorts Program. It’s called Earmouse and Bottle. I learned a ton about the entire production pipeline, and got to work with a lot of talented people who helped create my vision. In the end I got this professionally made, finished product of a silly idea I came up with while doodling at home.

7) What/who inspires you?
When I want to get the inspiration juices flowing I usually go to a book store or a comic book store. I walk around forever and look at EVERYTHING. Something about that gets me inspired to create.

8) What is your advice for aspiring artists or people interested in entering animation?
Draw a lot. Draw everywhere and everything. Fill a sketchbook a month. Find friends that like to draw. Go out sketching with them at coffee shops, the mall, the zoo. Critique each other’s work. Attend life drawing classes/workshops. Look into what jobs there are in a studio. Pick one that plays to your strengths, and work towards that goal of creating a portfolio and then creating a better one. Look at work online from people that do those jobs. Recognize what it takes. Never settle for “good enough” in your work. There’s a line of people behind you who are working harder to become better than “good enough”. Then apply and apply again. Be ready for many rejection letters from many places. And then be ready to take it up a notch and try again. Ultimately your real goal is to become undeniably good. If you can do that, animation jobs will rain from the sky.

9) Who was your mentor?  
My freshman year in high school, my art teacher Nataha Lightfoot built his own animation equipment (light table, pencil tester, etc.). He started the animation club, which I joined immediately. The club turned into a class which I took every semester of high school. Mr. Lightfoot always encouraged me but mostly just helped by giving me access to everything I needed and left me alone to make all the crazy films I wanted. He went on to supply schools across the country with his animation supplies and teach other teachers how to teach animation. If you have an animation class at your school, chances are it’s because of him.

10) What are your favorite hobbies?
I like to go out sketching with friends, and I love going to the movies.

11) What is one of the most challenging aspects of your job?
Taking something that might be mildly entertaining or somewhat funny and pushing it to be something that is going to blow the roof off the place and make people laugh out loud. And doing it in very little time.

12)  What is your spirit animal?
Animal (from the Muppets). If I could make cartoons like Animal plays the drums… watch out!

13)  Favorite Nickelodeon show?
Ren and Stimpy.

14)  Favorite Nickelodeon quote or catchphrase?
“We’re not hitchhiking anymore… we’re riding” - Ren Hoek to bar of soap.

15)  Favorite snack?
This is a really boring answer, but trail mix can really get me through the day if my lunch wasn’t big enough. (If I didn’t care about my aging, bloating body I’d say candy.)

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Follow Brian to see more of his amazing work:

Twitter: @brianmorante 
Tumblr: @brianmoranteart

And watch Brian’s Nick Animated Short Earmouse and Bottle.