artist's resources

docs.google.com
Convention Spending Tracker
Sheet1 Table, Badge, Flight, Hotel, Printing, Misc., Misc., Total Expense, Amount Made, Total, Profit,

I posted this to Twitter earlier this week and it kind of blew up, but I want to post it here too. Just a little something I use to help myself keep track of spending during convention season, made into a rainbow because why not make more things rainbow?

Whether you’re tabling or just attending for fun, conventions can get expensive - especially when you include travel costs! I’ve used this sheet for about three years now, and helps me make decisions for future conventions. Sometimes it turns out I did better at a con than I thought I did! Or maybe I didn’t do so great compared to last year and need to think about coming back again. Oh, and everything listed are purchases that you get e-mail reminders about, so if you can’t remember the cost of a table or flight, it’s probably somewhere in your e-mail. I try to fill mine out as I buy flights and order prints, but sometimes I’m digging up old e-mails after the con is over.

Some things worth considering that are not on this sheet: food costs, gas if you drive to cons, baggage fees, and shipping if you ship your supplies in advance. Please feel free to download and edit this sheet as you see fit for your own needs! I hope it helps. And let me know if you have any questions, I’m happy to answer them!

EDIT: HOLY SMOKES, lenalibrarian on Twitter took my convention spending tracker and made it 100x better!!

–> SMART CONVENTION SPENDING TRACKER <– (original link edited too!)

It now calculates your costs and total profits AUTOMATICALLY!! Which is super useful for someone who’s terrible with numbers like me. I just finished importing all my 2017 convention spending so far, and this smart sheet caught a few mistakes already. I’ll be using this sheet for years to come, thank you lenalibrarian!!

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American Gods: Shadows #4 by Glenn Fabry

Variant cover by David Mack

American Gods: Shadows #4

Neil Gaiman (W), P. Craig Russell (W/A), Scott Hampton (A), Colleen Doran (A), Glenn Fabry (Cover), and David Mack (Variant cover)
Neil Gaiman!
On sale June 14 • FC, 32 pages • $3.99 • Ongoing
During an overnight stay at their home, Shadow awakens to a visit from the third of the Zorya sisters: Zorya Polunochnaya. The Midnight Sister’s advice is ethereal and strange, yet vital … and Shadow can’t seem to separate reality from the dream world.
The Hugo, Bram Stoker, Locus, World Fantasy, and Nebula Award—winning novel and upcoming Starz television series by Neil Gaiman adapted as a comic series for the first time!
A Starz TV show!
“Russell’s lyrical layouts bring Gaiman’s visual, vivid prose to life like no other artist.”—Comic Book Resources

anonymous asked:

What are some good ways to start a story of chapter? I always have a hard time trying to begin the story in an interesting way.

Hi!

I’ve actually answered quite a few asks about this – if you search the tag “starting your story”, they should come up! Not everything in them will be relevant to you, because some are quite specific, but there should still be a few nuggets of information that can help you.

Below I’ll link you to some another post that may help you!

Story introductions to avoid

Best wishes! (Sorry, I would link you to more posts, but my wifi is kind of spotty and I don’t want to keep this ask waiting too long.) The best piece of advice I can give you is not to hold off on the action for too long – place your inciting incident as close to the front of the story as possible.

Hope this at least helps a little bit! If you need anything else, please feel free to ask! - @authors-haven

30 Day Pose Drawing Challenge
  1. Standing Idly
  2. Stretching
  3. Lying down
  4. Sprinting
  5. Peering down a cliff or building
  6. Dancing
  7. Bent in pain
  8. Hung upside down
  9. Sneaking on tip toes
  10. Fighting stance
  11. Sitting and leaning on elbow
  12. Puking over toilet
  13. Doing the bridge
  14. Artistic posing
  15. Delivering a punch
  16. Dancing on a pole
  17. Checking out own ass
  18. Jumping over something
  19. Foetus position
  20. Tripping over
  21. Ballerina pose
  22. Reverse prayer (bondage)
  23. Shooting a rifle
  24. Jumping to catch a ball
  25. Sleeping on the desk
  26. Replication of a pose in a famous painting
  27. Mechanical bull ride
  28. Sitting with criss-crossed legs
  29. Magical girl pose
  30. Holding a “Well done!” banner
Road to Success: Before Opening for Commissions

Artist’s Notes

**First off! I made this specifically for DeviantArt, and then realized that it really applies to every artist who is looking to get into the market of freelance work. I apologize that this journal references that site specifically quite a bit, but the information is still solid.

Commissions. Commissions. Commissions!
It’s all anyone on here seems to talk about. It’s like a measure of popularity.
But there’s a lot of danger in opening for commissions before you’re prepared, and that’s what this particular journal is about. Let’s avoid the common commission pitfalls (a journal for another day  ) and get a healthy, fully prepared start!

Build Your Fanbase

I’ve seen some people join deviantArt (or other sites) and instantly expect to get commissions. We’re talking the same day that they sign up.
Sorry, that’s just not how it works. Actually, you’ll be lucky to get commissions on deviantArt at all. DeviantArt is a community of artists. Sure, there are some buyers on here as well, but very rarely will you find regular work on this site. I like deviantArt because it’s a social network with other artists. It’s a place where I can come to make friends and learn. Sure, I can advertise myself on here, but most of my work comes from my Twitter, Tumblr, and own legwork.
I’d recommend establishing yourself with the same username in as many places as you comfortably can. When you’re narrowing down the prospects, I’d say to avoid small, start-up art communities (you know the ones I’m talking about, those “exclusive”, “by invite only” art sites. Who is going to buy your work there?). Make yourself known on established websites where there is already a user base to be a part of. Twitter, Tumblr, Art Station, Behance, deviantArt, LinkedIn, ConceptCookie and even FurAffinity (if you’re into that kind of thing) are all fantastic options.

Understand Pricing and it’s Consequences 

First off, don’t sell for points. Points is quite literally the equivalent of pocket change. 80 points is $1.
That means that if you’re selling a full color image for 500 points (which I see all the time) you’re selling it for $6.25.
$6.25 for a full picture. A full picture that I can promise you’ve spent more than a half an hour on.
I’ll write a full journal on how pricing works, but generally, you should not be selling your work for less than minimum wage per hour.
I’ll go through a lot of other pricing options in the other journal, but keep in mind that you are working on artwork. This is your time and you should be paid for it. Yes, you might absolutely LOVE doing artwork (so do I!) but you should still be paid for creating images for other people.
If you choose not to be paid now, or to be paid in pocket change now, or to be paid for $5/hr now, you’ll likely regret it later. Your “target market” for lower pricing will not be the same as your target market for average pay. People who pay in dA points likely won’t be returning for more work later, and if they do, it’ll be for the same price. People who are willing to pay what your work is worth are more likely to be repeat customers, are likely to talk more about your work if you do a good job, and are, of course, willing to give you the amount that you deserve so that you’re doing less work for the appropriate amount of money. If you spend most of your time targeting the lower-range market you won’t be able to raise your prices later. (For the record, I’m not talking about general watchers and followers, some people just can’t afford to buy art or don’t need it, but they’re no less valuable in terms of having an awesome fan base. We’re strictly talking about clientele here).

Create a Strong Terms of Service Agreement

Do your research!
Don’t just look at other ToS Agreements on deviantArt, many of them are not strong. If you can’t afford to hire an attorney, do some serious Google searching. There are a ton of really good samples of what your ToS should include.
Again, I’m planning a full journal for this as well, but a few points I could make right now are to include;
A) That you own all rights to your work. Make sure that this is a part of your Terms of Service. Yes, it goes without saying that you own what you make, but many times customers have the misinformed idea that because they’ve paid you they automatically own the artwork and can sell it, make prints of it, etc.
B) A clause about what happens if you become ill. I know it’s likely not something you’re thinking about now, but what if you take a commission and suddenly become ill or are involved in an accident of some kind? You’ll want to detail out what happens. Does the customer get a full refund? Do you require an extension on the work deadline? Do you retain their deposit or the payment for the work that’s been completed, but refund the rest? Think about this now, not later.
C) Bounced checks and returned payments. What if the client pays you in a check and it bounces? What happens if they do a charge-back with PayPal? Is there a fee that you’ll need covered? Most companies have a Returned Payment Fee because they don’t want to get stuck with the fee from the bank or processing center. It’s a smart fee to have included in your contract. From a consumer point of view, I know we all hate that fee, but from a business perspective, it’s a smart idea to have.
D) Do you have a Rush Fee? If a client contacts you and says “I need this done in three days time!” and your average turn around is a month, will there be an additional charge? Keep in mind that this means you’ll be putting all your other clients on the back burner, working longer hours than usual and possibly even weekends or holidays - maybe both. Most artists do have an additional charge for this. Think of it as over time.

**Have a Terms of Service before you open for commissions. Not after. Don’t wait for something to happen where you wish you’d had one.** 

Have Samples of Your Work

Weirdly enough, I felt the need to add this in here. I’ve seen a few people open for commissions that they don’t even have examples for. I’ve been contacted by people who have seriously told me “I don’t have any samples of animation, but I’m a really good animator. I work for $50/30 seconds. When do I start?”.
What?
No!
Don’t be that person. If you’re offering character design commissions, have some samples. If you’re offering storyboard commissions, have some samples. Illustration? Have some samples. Badges? Make some samples. Animation? You guessed it. Samples.
By doing this you’re not only showing your potential customers that you can provide the work you’re claiming you can and giving an example of quality, you’re doing yourself a favor by knowing an approximate of how long it’s going to take you to finish the work so you’re not overcharging your customer or short changing yourself.

In Closing

Remember! These steps aren’t just to help you get more commissions, they’re there for your protection. You don’t want to be involved in an all-too-common horror story scenario where a client can take advantage of you, and you don’t want to give your client a horror story about yourself (that they’ll undoubtedly share with every one of their friends and followers).

Protect your client, protect yourself, and protect your business.

glassrain  asked:

Hi! I was wondering if you would mind helping me with something; my mind has taken the liberty of creating this fantasy world. Which is all fine and well, except I have neither plot nor characters to put with it, and my head's beginning to feel rather crowded. Any ideas on how to create some, or spark my inspiration?

Sure!

One thing you could do is just start writing about your world – introduce yourself and get to know it, not necessarily from any character’s POV, but more like a travel booklet, in which the purpose is to describe and explore. Incorporate all five senses, and don’t hold back – explore every corner of it. In places with people, describe the people: the fat man running the plant shop, the short woman roasting meat over a weak fire, and so forth (you may find an interesting character or two that way!). You don’t necessarily have to write it as a narrative – I always think of details better when I write them out in list form – but you can. Just explore your world, and enjoy it as you do so.

Once you feel you have enough to operate on – once you’re on first-name basis with your world – start listing things that could go wrong somehow. If your world includes magic, what would happen if magic somehow disappeared? If your world’s government fell apart, what would be the effect? Once you have some promising ideas, try to imagine how people would react: say you choose the disappearance of magic as your conflict. Would some people try to get it back? Would others learn to live without it? Would someone figure out a way to bring it back, then use their magic (which is now exclusive to them – no one else has it) to enslave/exploit others? If so, who would rise up to stop them? Just come up with scenarios until you find one you like, then create characters (namely an atagonist and a protagonist) based off of the various positions in that scenario.

Hope this helps! If you need anything else, please feel free to ask! - @authors-haven

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I’ve been going pretty hard on gesture drawing the past few days. ~1-2 min each. My two favorite gesture drawing resources are New Masters Academy and the Croquis Cafe on Youtube. :)

youtube

I’ve been meaning to make this video for a few months now, and finally put it together this week!

daniella501  asked:

Hi! I've been reading your blog and loving every single post. I'm a beginner at writing, and I was wondering: how could you write a realistic character?

Hi, thank you! I’m always glad to hear that this blog is helpful.

How to write realistic characters is always a common question among beginning writers, and I’d be happy to help you answer it. (Here’s my post on general character-building tips – it may help you.)

1. Give every character some sort of flaw.

Just as people aren’t perfect, neither are characters. It doesn’t have to be any huge problem – although it can be – but give each character something, whether it be stubbornness or a bad temper or being too giving. (My post on character flaws may give you some ideas.)

2. However, don’t make characters all good or all bad.

Give your protagonists bad traits and things they’re not good at, and give your antagonists talents and good traits. Chances are even the worst people think they’re doing right – just look at Hitler.

3. Don’t put your characters in boxes or give them limitations.

Just because your character is feminine doesn’t mean they can’t be an awesome streetfighter; just because your character plays varsity football doesn’t mean they can’t be intellectual and well-spoken. People are endless blends of traits, which is why they’re unique – so are characters.

Those are some blanket statements on creating characters – below I’ll link you to posts that may also help you!

Creating Likeable Characters

Building Friendships Between Characters

Writing Dialogue (the way a character speaks can tell a lot about them, which is why I’ve linked you to this post)

5 Ways To Develop A Convincing Character

Writing Dynamic Relationships

Character Mannerisms

Character Development

Writing Romantic Relationships

Also, @thecharactercomma specializes in characterization (and grammar), so that blog will probably be a huge help.

Hope this helps! If you have any more questions, feel free to ask! - @authors-haven

Creating Likeable Characters

Sometimes it’s difficult to make your characters likeable as they are tested and are pushed to further and further lengths. Sometimes they have to make hard decisions, and sometimes the pressure gets to them and they mess up, hurt another character or an innocent bystander. How can you keep them likeable throughout the whole plotline?

- Keep their motivations pure.
It almost always comes back to the heart – if their heart is pure, and that’s established early-on, the audience is more likely to root for them.

- Give them flaws – make them human.
Not every character has to have some huge problem, like an addiction or a traumatic past or a disability – if your entire cast does, it’s no problem, but it’s not necessary. But every character has to have some flaw(s), whether it’s cheating at card games because he can’t stand to lose or being too-closed minded or closing off when she gets too emotional. If your character doesn’t have a flaw, they start to come off as too perfect, too angelic, pretentious.

- Give them permission to mess up.
This ties in with flaws – if your character is inclined to make a bad decision at any point in the plot, don’t steer him away from it because “oh no he’s my protagonist and he must be Good and Whole and Pure and All-Knowing”. Let him walk into that ambush despite the sick feeling in his stomach and get half his army killed; let her rush into a confrontation with a bully and get into a fight with another girl who has a switchblade. Let your characters mess up – it shows that they’re human.

- But if your character messes up, let them own up to it eventually.
The general who killed half his army by ignoring the unease in the back of his mind might cry over their makeshift graves long after the rest of the platoon is asleep; the girl sitting in the infirmary might feel remorse for knocking her opponent’s block off. Or your characters might argue and might be stubborn and might not apologize for weeks. But let them apologize eventually. This goes back to the heart, and what the character knows is right.

- Relationships with other characters are vital.
That’s not to say a loner character can’t be likeable – but the audience’s perception of a loner character is determined by the thoughts/words of other characters. Characters all color each other and define parts of each other, just like people do to each other in real life. If your character is a jerk to other characters and other characters don’t like him (especially if the characters who dislike him are likeable), the audience won’t like him either. The character’s image depends not just on himself, but on his supporting cast.

Hope this helps! - @authors-haven

Character flaws

- Self-image: arrogant // having low self-esteem.
The subtleties: the character getting him/herself into trouble because (s)he thinks (s)he can do more than (s)he actually can // a lack of confidence, which can be annoying to other characters & can possibly be dangerous, if it surfaces at a crucial moment
The extremes: narcissism or a god complex // self-destruction (either conscious or unconscious)

- Temperament: uncontrollable // so controlled the character goes numb.
The subtleties: irritable temperament, which causes conflict between characters // indifference that can be hurtful to other characters, which also causes conflict
The extremes: verbal or physical violence (possibly homicide) // being cold, calculating and ruthless

- Opinions: strong // weak. (Although weak opinions or beliefs make for flawed characters, strong opinions on their own are not necessarily flaws – it depends on what the character believes so strongly, and if they believe so strongly they are no longer open-minded.)
The subtleties: making enemies who have different beliefs than you // being seen as kiss-ass or wishy-washy
The extremes: radicalism or zealotry // untrustworthiness

- Loyalty: loyal // disloyal. (Again, loyalty is not necessarily a flaw – as long as it’s in moderation.)
The subtleties: annoying heroics // hesitation to help the protagonist(s), which, if the character in questions holds important questions/materials, can be problematic
The extremes: zealotry or being foolishly loyal (unnecessarily leading self/others to danger or destruction due to loyalty – particularly pointless if it’s only to prove a point, rather than a practical reason) // untrustworthiness

Please, feel free to reblog with your thoughts/add-ons!

Awesome resource for artists who need help finding their ‘voice’ for the FFXV boys

I recently saw this post going around by @promptae about the FFXV fandom reducing the main 4 boys to very basic and degrading stereotypes. It kind of upset me, because A) I worried that I was doing this to them, too and B) I think they bring up a good point and I would hope other fan artists would work hard to avoid portraying the boys in this way. 

So, I’m working on a fic right now and I needed some inspiration for some of Gladio’s lines, and what’s better for inspiration than canon dialogue? I didn’t, however, want to run around in my own game waiting for banter or scroll endlessly through tumblr looking for gif sets or videos, so I headed over to youtube. 


What I ended up finding was a huge playlist of over 200 banters compiled by YouTube user Savannah Grace NC. This was a HUGE help to me, being able to just sit and listen to banter after banter of the boys in various situations, happy, sad, angry, excited, etc, and I just thought I’d share for anyone else struggling to balance four very distinct personalities and ways of speaking. 

We choose to portray characters out of character for many reasons–for AUs, because we’re looking for a certain reaction out of a character, because we introduced a new character or OC into the mix, because we’re writing a crack fic–and I’m not saying it’s the end of the world if you choose to do this. But, personally I think trying to write/draw/RP a character as in character as possible is a lot of fun, and can be very rewarding for both the artists and other fans reading/observing the art. 


Happy writing/drawing/RPing/head-canon-constructing!!!

“I’d kill for a coffee right about now.”

“I’d kill just for the hell of it.”

nourgelitnius  asked:

I searched your navigation and didn't see an answer to this. Do you know of any blogs or resources for POC face claims? I am a very visual person when it comes to creating all my characters, but this story idea I have has predominantly POC characters. Simply searching "(insert nationality/race) men/women/child" in google doesn't bring up very many varied or usable results that aren't based on Caucasian ideals of beauty. I have a few pictures, but would like more to work from.

Anonymous asked: I really enjoy ‘casting’ my characters, but I’m having huge issues finding POC male actors that are ~20. Do you know any sites with helpful lookups like this, or any actors you recommend looking up?

Sources for POC Face Claims

Howdy! As an artist I personally tend to scour ModelMayhem, since you can specify factors like race, height, age, eye, skin and hair color. 

- Rodríguez

We’ve got a Character Inspiration tag, organized by (WOC) (MOC) (POC). That could also be a start. Many of the sources come from blogs of models and submissions.

- Colette

Commentary: 

@unlessyoudreamofme:

Pinterest can be a great source for this kind of thing. Try searching for “character inspiration” boards (there are loads) and go from there. Some character inspiration boards feature mostly photos of white people, of course, but there are plenty of Pinterest users who collect images of diverse people on their inspiration boards.