art-help

to other mentally ill artists who are obsessed with getting better

- Finished Pieces TM are NOT the only works that matter. That half-lined sketch is good. That page of nothing but shapes and doodles is progress. If you’re doing whatever it is that you CAN do that day, you’re doing well

- take. BREAKS. as often as you need to. stop when you gotta. if you try to dig into tomorrow’s spoons to finish something, trust me, you’re going to hate yourself and whatever you’re working on later

- if you really want to, you CAN draw (or paint, or sculpt, or craft etc.) every day

- everything counts. everything. can’t draw for more than 20 minutes today? you drew. less than 5? you drew. take a pencil and draw three different circles on a sticky note. you drew. lay out your arm and trace whatever comes to mind with you finger. everything counts.

- if you drew SOMETHING today, you gained more experience than someone who did not

- draw whatever you want

- reward yourself for it

- don’t get so wrapped up in something that you forget to eat, drink water or sleep please. if you can’t make yourself care about what it does to your body, remember it WILL affect your productivity, which will lead to Bad Times, again, trust me

- you are SOMEONE’S art goals

- your art is good

- “this person doesn’t know me or my art, how do they know it’s good-” shh. doesn’t matter. its good

2

Hey, guys! I’ve noticed that there are a lot of artists who struggle with “same face syndrome,” or the tendency to draw all their characters with the same face. To help you combat this, I’ve created two different challenges!

The first (pink) one is mainly geared towards artists who are struggling with same face syndrome and want to start branching out. It covers topics that a lot of artists struggle with when drawing faces, such as age, weight, and face shapes. It’s not super specific, so you still have some wiggle room.

The second (yellow) one is a bit harder and is mainly geared towards artists who want to really challenge themselves to diversify their faces. Personally, I think this one’s the most fun to work with despite it being more difficult. Chances are with this one, you’re not going to be drawing a whole bunch of beautiful people. You don’t have to roll for every option on this one either.  A certain combination of rolls from 10/13 of the options may give you a great character idea, and that’s great!

I hope you guys enjoy these! I’d love for you to send me your drawings if you do one (or both) of them.

Okay, so Yuuri’s hobby is gaming.

Has there been art done of him playing video games? Is there an artist somewhere who also finds the idea of Yuuri gaming in baggy house clothes, thick socks, in the zone and ignoring a whining Viktor in the background cute as hell?

PLEASE I NEED THESE THINGS.

For some reason, I imagine Yuuri to be a console gamer? I think we have only seen him with his laptop, but still, I don’t know. Somehow I imagine him playing solitary games and RPGs. He probably tried MMORPGs, I guess. While I think Yuuri would get stressed out by the demands of real-time gaming - not to mention the weird-ass angry players… yeah, I’m looking at you Russians - it’s also fun to imagine him as that Asian kid with a strong af high-level mage trouncing everyone else. But maybe his one true online friend is Phichit, lol.

Plot twist: Yuri Plisetsky is an Angry Russian Gamer™ and probably encountered Yuuri at some point online without either of them knowing.

anonymous asked:

I love the purple gradient on the line art thing you do! Is it something you add after you finish the drawing?

Yep, I add it after the sketch is 100% done otherwise:

Original ^

Drawing over the sketch with a darkish purple (note: this color must be lighter than the original color used for lineart) w/ mode set to lighten ^

Same step, again, with a lighter purple-red.

Then redraw (w/ normal mode on) certain areas in black to make em pop.

anonymous asked:

Cis gender boys are so hard to draw ?? Like they have no curves ??? How do I draw that

Cis gender boys are hard to draw because biological woman have obvious curves, like butt and tits, to portray it take less, cause we just need to exxagerate on it to make it look right. But cis gender boys have less obvious curves, but yes, they do have A LOT of curves, maybe more than cis woman! 

Their curves are so delicate that it is more hard to get it right. One distortion and it will look wrong. muscular or not, guys are full of them. You just need more references and practice! 

 Biological woman do have bigger curves couse they need to have a big waist to give birth and bigger brests to feed the child. Guys just have it in a smaller version cause it does not really have function. But yet, they are not that different!

anonymous asked:

Hello there; I've been looking through your blog and, as many others say, I just ADORE your art! I was also wondering if you could give me some advice. For quite a few months now I've utterly lost all motivation to draw. I want to go into something with art, so this devastates me, and whenever I try to draw I just get so easily frustrated. I've been an avid artist since I can remember, so for me to suddenly not want to draw for months on end really concerns me. Any suggestions to fix this?

(hi!! apologies for the late reply. i hope this can still be of some help to you despite that!)

i think that’s a feeling every artist struggles with at some point. you love art, you love making art, and it’s immensely frustrating when that suddenly doesn’t work out despite all the effort you’ve been putting in. and then you start to lose motivation, question yourself and everything you’re doing, and it’s a vicious cycle that’s really hard to break out of. so what can we do?

well, here’s a thing. let’s call it the productivity branch.

i feel like my own creative cycles are very seasonal. not in the sense that my creativity depends on the season, but rather that my creativity itself goes through different seasons.

  • spring: new ideas, motivation, productivity still low 
  • summer: lots of ideas and very productive
  • autumn: still productive drawing leftover ideas, but new ideas are harder to come by. and then 
  • winter: nothing. art-block. lack of ideas, everything-sucks-syndrome, no motivation, the creative part of my brain is basically hibernating

that’s you up there. you’re in a creative winter right now. and without any inspiration or motivation it’ll be hard to find a way to cross that gap over to a new spring (pls bear with the cheesy analogies). and if your cut yourself off from inspirational influence you might start to think that, hey, this isn’t so bad. i mean, who needs spring right? just means you have to do things. be active. yikes. winter’s pretty chill. haha. 

but don’t do that. it’ll come around and bite you at some point, because that lack of motivation and activity might start to seep into other parts of your life, not just the creative one, and you don’t want that.

so! when you don’t have ideas and motivation to create, then don’t create. but instead make an effort to inspire yourself. inspiration entails motivation (and vice versa).

  • read books, short stories, poems, science articles, anything
  • go on walks, explore your surroundings, if affordable maybe even go somewhere farther away
  • let people tell you stories
  • listen to new music
  • try things you haven’t done before (deliberately break old habits)
  • go through other people’s inspiration blogs
  • collaborate with a friend
  • get really invested in something, talk to others about it
  • watch movies, animated shorts, documentaries 
  • or speedpaintings and art tutorials
  • try different techniques, or new brushes
  • look at art that’s so inspiring that you can’t believe you’re still just sitting there not drawing anything yourself
  • and most importantly, be receptive. take in the world around you, rearrange it in your head, and draw whatever you end up with. that’s the core of what creativity is

think about what you want to achieve. make your friends smile? draw something really cool you can print out and hang up in your room? touch people’s hearts? deliver a message? whatever it is, and however small or inconsequential it might seem, keep it in mind. it’s your light at the end of the tunnel.

if want to keep drawing for the sake of muscle memory while you’re still looking for your inspiration: 

  • illustrate your daily activities
  • draw a random shape or find one in a photo (clouds are ideal for this) and turn it into a character or object
  • pick different pictures and combine elements from each of them into one drawing
  • do plain ol’ studies 
  • basically don’t try to come up with things completely from scratch. find something to work with and go from there. that will save you the mentally draining task of coming up with a subject, so you can start actively drawing right away

if you still can’t make yourself pick up a pen, make a schedule. train your brain to turn its creative gears at a specific time of the day, make that a habit. do it for pavlov

approach drawing with the awareness that what you create might suck, especially when you’re out of practice, but this doesn’t mean that it will always suck, and it doesn’t mean you suck. if you learn to dissociate your current creative achievements from your worth as a person and your future potential you will get back to work a lot easier, improve faster, and be more resistant to setbacks. 

find something that makes it worth the effort of working through the frustration. 

you might need to try a lot of different things because everyone copes with this differently, and even when a method worked once that doesn’t mean it always will. so start trying! you can only find inspiration if you start looking for it. 👍

reverie-addict  asked:

Hi, Vetyr! You mentioned that you work on 4000 x 4000 canvas. I wonder how long does it take you to finish a painting on average. Do you actually spend lots of time polishing the soft/hard edges? They seem to be so effortless. ;_; another question is how do you achieve such smooth transition? Does it have anything to do with pressure or flow setting of the brush?

It usually takes about 2.5-4 hours, and yeah I definitely spend a lot of time getting the edges just the way I want them.  Every so often, I’ll touch up areas with a soft brush, but much of the time I can get a pretty smooth transition between values/colors with a hard round brush w/ transfer enabled and set to ‘pen pressure’ (I don’t use flow), and excessive use of the eyedropper tool.  Also, a note for the gif below (which is running at 3x speed): when I’m blending colors and I don’t want the gradient to be muddy, I add a saturated color- in this case, pink- to the mix to keep it vibrant.

obligatory extra pic:

anonymous asked:

Hi so... I'm a 9th grader and I'm an artist as well. Whenever I'm bored, I draw stuff like scarecrows, monsters and dragons. Then one day, my teacher saw me draw and she asked me that offends me SO MUCH! She said, "You always draw scary stuff everytime. Do you have depression?" Calling me a depressed person just for a creepy art is getting on my nerves. Thar's why I never show my art to everyone. It's not the first time people ask me if I was depressed but.. what shall I do with this situation?

Interest varies with each individual. 
Art is displayed in different forms.

When I was in 5th grade, I use to like creative writing but one day I had a teacher took my paper/story away and stuck it on the board and asked everyone to laugh at me.

I understand..its hurtful and it scarred me. But it should not stop your creativity and talents. It took me long enough to regain the courage to display my art/interest in writing again. You can’t let these “people” affect you that way. They are just briefly there in your life and soon they will get out of it. 

It is YOU, YOURSELF that matters and YOU can do what YOU love :)

anonymous asked:

Do you have any tips for composition?? I'm a beginner on that and I really love the way you do it

thank you! (again ive never had any real training in any of this) but i would say! know your basic composition rules/template things- golden ratio, golden spiral, etc, first of all. For me personally, i draw a lot of wide open spaces/backgrounds so MOST of my composition are rule-of-thirds ( i really should try the spiral more often). 

second, think about line balances/unbalance. it’s about the mood you want to set. for example, with the first drawing i wanted a very laid-back tranquil mood, so i wanted a sense of balance with my composition with the upward slope of one hill being canceled out with the downward slope of the second. for the second one, however, i wanted some energy, so i sought to create an upset with the lines.

third, i’d consider color balances/ imbalances. colors have SO much say in where your eye travels around the picture (and also im a color FREAK). you can use darker colors to frame a picture if your piece feels too big and empty and you want the focus to narrow down without actually making the canvas smaller:

if you want the viewer’s eyes to just travel around the picture and take the whole thing in, distribute colors evenly throughout the canvas. (sorry it’s so messy, but you get the point) think about the distribution of hue, saturation, and darkness/lightness.

if you want them to focus on that ONE thing, you can concentrate saturation, brightness, warmness etc to make the area pop. i used all three in these drawings!

also! @genicetea has some NEEAATT stuff on drawing the viewer’s eye and contrasts and composition on her twitter so if you want something that actually makes sense go there!

hope that helps a little! and sorry for the long post but you all should really expect that by now :’)

OKey dokey, uncle Aes has some tips that’ll make your lives a little more easier. This is how to make a picture more believable when having a character interact with an item that is larger than their persons. First tip! -Always draw the object that is being acted upon, FIRST.

Let’s take this chair for example, drawing a character sitting is not an easy task, I know. But with a little know how and can-do it can be pretty fun and satisfying. Drawing the object that is being acted upon first not only lends a little more realism, but it also really helps when you are drawing in perspective, case and point

Here is the difference between 1)drawing the chair first, THEN drawing the figure, versus 2)Drawing the figure first, then drawing everything AROUND that figure. #2 does not make a lot of sense, it’s all wonky and the proportions are all wrong, this is because the chair is conformin to the figure’s weight.

Example 2, stairs. Figure 1 will always look more believable than figure 2. The figure drawing  in example 1, is under the forced perspective that the stairs lend. Example 2 makes for a confusing picture to look at. because we don’t know where the feet fall naturally, and the stairs are uneven and UGLY

With both examples where the character is drawn first, the weight of the character is manipulating the environment around it, instead of the other way around. Perspective is really hard to understand, but it is really important to practice it EVEN if it looks funny. In these examples right above, they do not give a very realistic/believable reading. It’s always gonna be a guessing game of where to put an object, and if you’re gonna have a guessing game it might as well be the CHARACTER you’re guessing about and NOT the environment.

All in all, to those strugglin with drawing characters in an environment, always ALWAYS draw the object that is being acted upon FIRST. I’m not gonna say that my drawings are absolutely accurate, they still look wonky time to time, but it helps to be mindful of these things! Don’t be afraid to try tho, always use a reference and soon enough you’ll get the hang of it too :^y

anonymous asked:

Heyho Maddox! So I need advice. I'm a 12 year old artist. Everyone in school refer me as a "young artist" and I love drawing. It's my passion. But, my parents aren't supporting me and tend to get mad at me everytime I want to draw. They want me to stop and be a doctor but I don't want to. I want to be a successful artist like you. Help please?

My parents didn’t really supported me being an artist till I was 18 (when I decided to do art for good). But I understand why they push us to do something else besides art. They worry and they know its an unstable/unpredictable job. 

You are also really young at the moment. When I was your age, I wanted to be a Fashion Designer or a Veterinarian but ended up doing Animation because believe me when I say ART is just a general term of so many other specialisations that you have to consider.

Its just like if you wanna be a doctor, what kind of doctor you wanna be. Same applied with art, what kind of art based job you wanna pursue? I am currently studying animation but I like illustration very much. And there are a lot more like graphic design, interior design, fashion design, comic artist, and etc. So you do need to do more research and put more thought on what you really want focus on for art.

I will also be very real with you since you are considering this as your future and job. Art is something you really need to love and have 100% passion in doing because there are a lot of factors like rejections, criticisms and conflicts that may make you feel like shit.

If you are very sure if you are gonna give art your all, then go for it. Convince your parents in every way possible because thats ONE of the few conflicts that you need to over come. Its like an endless battle when it comes to the creative industry. Do what you strongly believe in. 

Convince yourself before you convince others.

supersquiddy  asked:

Werid question but how do you get your traditional artwork to look so smooth but also sketchy? If that makes sense.

My main things are (this turned out to be a lot longer than I thought! Srry!)

Loose lines: draw with your whole arm if you can! (drawing anchored to your wrist can lead to Carpal tunnel syndrome.. and no one wants that)

Full lines: try to keep your lines fluid, fast and long (as opposed to short and scratchy lines that make one big line) look for YouTube videos on gesture drawing! Get things down quick and flesh them out later, usually the first thing we mark down will be the most accurate when doing gestures!

Sketch lightly: use heavy lines sparingly! They can really define a sketch but be sparing, there can be too much of a good thing. I always start sketches almost invisibly light to map out the bare bones of my drawings! Then because they’re so light, you don’t have to erase them if you don’t want to!

Shapes: shapes r your friends!! 🌸 use shapes to get the (figurative or literal) skeleton down!! Almost anything can be boiled down to basic shapes!

REFERENCE: IT! IS! OK! TO! REFERENCE! I can’t stress this enough, free reference photo databases are just a google away! Learn that anatomy fam! Even if you’re doing cartoons, it will be so much easier with the anatomical knowledge! Also, I have no problem with learning artists referencing my art when starting out with drawing.. 2 RULES TO REFERENCING PRE-EXISTING ART: 1) don’t claim it’s your art. 2) ask the artist if it’s cool first! Some aren’t okay with it and ya gotta respect it! ❤Also try to get off the crutch of referencing pre-existing art quickly! Referencing art helps you practice, but nothing beats referencing from real, organic life, because that’s where your style will come out.

Simplify: esp. pertaining to expressions, the more you complicate things, the harder it will be for it to read. It will get lost among the busyness. Look at the drawing as a whole as opposed to only paying attention for details. Don’t be concerned with making a masterpiece!! Sketchbooks should be messy!

Get back to basics: anatomy, colour theory and the elements of design!!! they help a whole heck of a lot!!! Never be satisfied with your knowledge of these basic things bc you learned them in like kindergarten,, okay????

A(cting)RT: you can convey a LOT if you have the mindset of telling a story with your sketch!

Cheap: don’t worry abt using fancy shmancy supplies! I get mine from the dollar store (sketchbook, erasers and mechanical pencils! Definitely get good paper if ur using copics or high quality markers but like I literally only sketch traditionally w pencil… ) I find I’m so scared to use expensive sketchbooks that I hardly draw in them and I hate everything I draw. I go through like 1 or more sketchbooks a month so… that would rack up quick if I was using like $20.00 sketchbooks instead of $2.00 ones.

Listen: Listen to music or podcasts or audio books or drawing tutorials if it helps!! It can sometimes even influence the mood of your drawing :0

Sketch often: every day if you can!! It’s a good habit if you want to get better!! And therapeutic!!!

Accept CONSTRUCTIVE criticism!!: It’s not an insult! It’s someone else’s view! Get critiqued often! And actually listen!! Know the difference between constructive and destructive!! Also join a community! Meet other artist! Collaborate! Art isn’t a competition! ❤

quick round!

Study art history: they’re famous for a reason!

Draw inspiration from everywhere!

When referencing, draw what you see, not what you know!

Think about drawing in 3D, more like it’s sculpting instead of drawing! Everything is made of flat plains and will cast shadows!!

If you’re up to it, challenge yourself! You’ll only get better if you step out of your comfort zone! Try to draw one new thing each sketching session!

Lastly

Don’t stress!: most important drawing tip! Drawing is supposed to be fun and therapeutic because it doesn’t have to be anything! All art is art and everyone who makes art is an artist, it’s not some exclusive club, we all start somewhere! This is your art journey! Enjoy the ride!

I know you just wanted to know about how I sketch but I couldn’t help myself!!! Sorry! Hope this helps! 🌸
-hanna ❤