art-davis

Mike Davis was an artist, and the irate company-wide memorandum was his canvas. Few in the history of humankind have recognized the savage beauty in this lowliest of media. But Davis—the erstwhile head of Tiger Oil Company, now dead at eighty-five—shattered the limits of the form with routine ease, showing us just how big an asshole one man could be. Consider his memos a spin-off of the Theater of Cruelty: “ ‘There will be no more birthday celebrations, birthday cakes, levity or celebrations of any kind within the office,’ the boss wrote on Feb. 8, 1978. ‘This is a business office. If you have to celebrate, do it after office hours on your own time.’ … ‘Do not speak to me when you see me,’ the man had ordered in a memo the month before. ‘If I want to speak to you, I will do so. I want to save my throat. I don’t want to ruin it by saying hello to all of you.’ ”


This and more in today’s arts and culture news.

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Artist Ellie Davies Spent 7 Years Turning UK Forests Into Magical Art Pieces

U.K. artist Ellie Davies spent seven years in the forest composing a series of different subjects, where she utilized nature’s organic tools to create surreal art installations. Eerie and beautiful in appearance, fragments of glitter and fabric seem to be suspended in the air. Their surreal appearance defy the laws of gravity; magic exists.

Enchanting in appearance Davies’ work is a meditation on humanity’s perspective on nature. Often seem as spell-binding, the artist emphasizes the forest’s symbol for fantasy and folklore. She admits:

“The forest represents the confluence of nature, culture, and human activity. Forests are potent symbols in folklore, fairy tale and myth, places of enchantment and magic as well as of danger and mystery.  In more recent history they have come to be associated with psychological states relating to the unconscious. Against this backdrop my work explores the ways in which identity is formed by the landscapes we live and grow up in.”

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Great space colonies.

From top to bottom:

  1. Angus McKie - The High Frontier from the book The Flights of Icarus (1977) by Donald Lehmkuhl with Martyn and Roger Dean.
  2. Painting by Don Davis from his Space Colony series, 1975
  3. The Three Island Space Colony by Roy Coombes from Harry Harrison’s book ‘Mechanismo’ (1978).
  4. Space station Illustration by Russian artist Andrei Sokolov, 1981.
  5. Space colony painting by Don Davis (1975)
  6. Stanford Torus colony - Gerard O'Neill 1974
  7. Space Station Interior for National Georgraphic magazine by Syd Mead from the book The Guide to Fantasy Art Techniques (1984)