art gallery openings

Agnès Varda has always been a shape-shifter. First a still photographer, she became a filmmaker at age twenty-six, and then, over the past decade and a half, a gallery artist. Her serenely beautiful show at Blum & Poe gallery in New York (through April 15) is a hop-skip-jump retrospective of her photography and gallery art that opens with a series of eighteen vintage silver prints from 1954 and is anchored by three photographic self-portraits. Depicting Varda respectively in her youth, midlife, and old age, they differ in their collage techniques but show her sharp-eyed gaze and Joan of Arc bowl haircut poignantly unchanged over sixty years. Elsewhere in the exhibition, three meditative moving-image installations fulfill her succinct self-description—that she has transformed herself “from an old filmmaker into a young artist.”

Gleaner’s Art: An Agnès Varda Exhibition

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While You Were Sleeping | Between The Lines (Sasha Barr

While you were sleeping, artist and designer Sasha Barr’s show Between The Lines, opened at Gallery 135 in Seattle, WA.  His show featured new prints–mono prints, and single color screen-prints individually colored by hand–all of which highlight Sasha’s signature style of clean lines, simple color, and harmonious compositions.  For a better insight into Sasha’s process, make sure to check out his art zone which we featured early in May – In The Studio | Sasha Barr

Photographs courtesy of the artist. 

“You’re too nice.” - h.s.

My friend gave me this idea and I’m just fulfilling her wish.

A one shot in which you are Kendall’s personal clothing consultant and Harry’s ex and see some very risqué pictures of the two of them on New Year’s Eve. But considering you’re a kind person, you let it go and someone you hoped to never see again calls you out for it.

Word Count: 4336

You didn’t have the last name Kardashian but you may as well have been one considering you spent the majority of your time with the family. You were Kendall’s personal clothing consultant and though you technically just worked for Kendall, you had definitely helped the other girls get ready for red carpet events and casual night outings in the past. You were close with them, and you’d appeared on their show a handful of times. There was no avoiding it, considering your business was pretty popular ever since you’d started working with Kendall and the Kardashian camera were everywhere.

You didn’t mind though, considering you and Kendall were ridiculously close ever since you’d started working with her a couple years ago and you were around the same age so you got along rather well. 

She was the one who introduced you to him actually. It was at an event and they came back to the hotel to hang out. You were sitting there zipping bags up and listening to music while drinking wine by yourself when their loud laughter startled you as they stumbled through the door. Everyone thought they were dating at the time but you knew from Kendall that they were just friends. There was absolutely nothing romantic going on between them but you could tell he was rather fond of her the minute you met him.

“Harry!” Kendall squealed, “Oh my gosh meet Y/N! She’s the reason I look so fabulous all the time,” she winked at you and shoved Harry forward so he stumbled over his feet. 

“I think you two will be needing some water,” you chuckled, “Fun night?”

“It’s nice to meet you Y/N,” he smiled a wide smile that split his whole face and offered you his hand. You shook it, chuckling because they were definitely both out of their minds drunk, and shuffled past him towards the kitchen. When they’d woken up the next morning, Harry hadn’t seen you sleeping on the couch when he went to sit down, almost killing you by crashing down on your stomach. An interesting conversation followed and you both hit it off rather well.

You were surprised really, considering you were the ‘behind the scenes’ type of girl and he basked in the spotlight. But somehow you ended up in a relationship. It also surprised you just how much Harry seemed to genuinely like you considering you could have sworn he had feelings for Kendall. But months went by and you two remained strong. You fell in love and you fell hard. It seemed that he did as well because you two were inseparable. He spent every waking and sleeping moment he could with you and you tried hard to fit into his schedule as well when he was on the road. 

It was a relationship full of mutual understandings and you both built each other up rather well. Harry even bought a house in the California area you were at just so he could, as he liked to say, “Come home to you.” 

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Here’s a closer look at my contribution to the Moleskine Project VI at @spoke_art gallery opening July 8th. I’ve seen some amazing work by the artists in this year’s show that has been both inspiring and humbling and makes me want to do something better next time. Hope you keep an eye out for the work as we have a great line up this year with plenty of new artists in the mix. 

How to Be a Great Art Ally to Your Creator Friends

Slightly tweaked from my 2015 post How To Be A Great ART ALLY

I’ve been having a lot of heart to hearts lately with my friends who are authors and artists and we’re all saying the same thing: It is getting harder and harder for everyone who isn’t in the top 5% of their industry to get the word out about work they are doing.

Because of the way the industries are now, many artists are not getting the marketing and push that they deserve or need. Much of that promotion and publicity now falls on the artist’s shoulder. Your artist friend may have a good career, but unless they are crazy lucky, or have the “it” thing of the moment, your artist friend is probably really struggling.

“What. But they have so many books out! They are on tour all the time! They are always doing some wacky play!”
Sadly, about 90% of artists are struggling and barely making a living wage. Most have full-time day jobs on top of their full-time art careers. Remember, every new project that they do is like starting from scratch.
For example, many of the people who I know who are not artists see all the stuff that I am doing and think that it’s going so great for me that I don’t need their help to get the word out about my books. But I do. All of your artist friends (even the most famous ones) need your support all the time.

To be a great Art Ally for any of your author/artist friends I’ve drummed up a list of things that you can do. I’ve focused on books, since I’m an author, but I’ve added helpful tips within to give you ideas on how to help your music, performer, filmmaker, comic book, visual artist and indie game maker friends.

1) Pre-order their stuff. Seriously. If your friend has a book (or CD or DVD or indie game or comic book) coming out pre-order it. Pre-orders give the publishing company an indication of interest and can help with print runs. Good pre-orders sometimes help a book because the publishing company may give a book a little push with extra marketing money and publicity based on those numbers.

2) Show up. If your friend has a reading or something, go to it. “But I went to it once for another book!” That’s great! You are a supporter! But, every book is a whole new thing! (Go to their rock show! Play! Art gallery opening! If your friend is in a film/made a film go opening weekend, that’s when the box office counts. Or order it on VOD the week it drops. Or buy the game the week it comes out. You get the idea.)

3) When you are there, buy the book. “But I already pre-ordered it!” Yeah, I know. But buying it at the store or the reading helps the bookstore and the numbers and will help your friend do another reading there the next time. This is especially important if your friend is doing a reading not in their hometown. (If your friend is a musician, buy merch because that might be how they are paying for gas. If your friend is an artist, buy a piece of art because that might equal a bag of groceries.) (comics peeps put your pals book on your pull list) (etc)

3a) “But argh! This is not my kind of book. I don’t read that genre. It’s not for me. I’m not a kid/teen.” Sure, that’s fair. The book might not be for you. But I bet you one million dollars that you know somebody that the book (or other thing) would be perfect for. Maybe a strange aunt? Maybe your weird nephew? Maybe your co-worker? And remember the holidays are always just around the corner! Why not get it signed? Think of it as a back up present. You can give it at a white elephant exchange. If all else fails, get a copy and donate it to your local library or if it’s a kids book, to the school library nearest you.

4) Signal boost it. While it may look to you like everybody knows about your friend’s book, they probably don’t. Remember that we are all kind of in a bubble when it comes to social media. Authors (and artists of all kinds) are always looking for new readers/audience and you totally have a bunch of friends that your author/artist friend doesn’t know. And those friends might have never heard of your friend’s book, movie, game, music and it might be right up their alley. And those friends have friends that you don’t know. And so on. And so on. So every once in a while, if you like and in a way that you are comfortable with, an easy Art Ally action is to Tweet, Instagram, Pintrest or Facebook (or repost) something about that person’s art thing on the social medias! This signal boosting helps to get new eyeballs on the book (or art thing) that your friend is doing.

5) Review it / Rate it. Perhaps you are on Goodreads? Or perhaps you frequent Amazon or B&N or Powells? If you really are a fan of the book (or art thing), a simple way to help boost your friend’s work is by giving it a star rating or a review. (For musicians you can do this at those places as well. Also you can add their album to your streaming site and rate it! For films rate it on Netflix if it’s there! For games there are places to do this too!)

5a) For books, on Goodreads it’s also helpful if you add it to your to read shelf. It’s both helpful before the book comes out and when the book comes out. So if you haven’t done it already, go to it! Add all your friends books to your to read shelf. It’s not too late!

6) Make sure that it is in your local library branch! Libraries are the biggest purchasers of books! An author wants their book to be read! Libraries help with that! Maybe you are librarian? Or someone super close to you is a librarian? This is where you can really help to get it on the library radar by making sure that it is on the order list for your branch or for your system. Sidenote: Many libraries are too poor to purchase books this is a great place for you to donate that extra book!

7) Many books have reader guides or teacher guides. Are you a teacher? Or is someone super close to you a teacher? If you love the book, consider using it in your class! Or if not that, you can donate the book to your (or your teacher pal’s) school library or classroom library for students to enjoy.

8) Book Club it. If you have a book club, suggest your group read your friend’s book. Or maybe just have a one-off book club and get a group of your friends together to read your friend’s book. If your friend writes for kids, do a mother/ daughter or father /son book club with a group of people. I’m 100% certain that your author friend would be delighted to come over (or if they live far, Skype) to discuss their book with your book club. (for musicians you could host a living room show at your house)

9) Ask your art pal to come in and speak! Maybe your school or library has a budget to bring in a variety of guest speakers for classrooms or assemblies? Your friend would be perfect for this. If your institution has no budget, you can still ask your friend to come and speak! Lots of authors have sliding scales and can organize a way to sell their own books and that can offset a pro bono visit. Also, it will help them to get new readers. Being an art ally is all about getting new audiences for your arty friends. (Your other artist pals would make great classroom / assembly visitors as well.)

10) Vote and Nominate. It’s possible that there are lists that you can vote on or nominate your friends for that they may be eligible for and deserving. This could be anything from your local publicly voted on thing to a list that is for professionals which you might be. It’s easy for everyone to remember to nominate the big best sellers of the year or the debut books that are getting the big pushes. But there are many midlist books that are wonderful and get lost in that shuffle. Make sure to champion the midlist! They really need help to be seen! (This is the same for all of your artist friends. There is always a thing that is going on where they can use your vote or nomination. You’ve gotten those emails / updates.)

11) Hand sell. Maybe you are a bookseller? Make sure that the book is on the shelf. And then, when and if you love it, hand sell it! You can also help by making sure that the book is still on the shelf once it’s sold. Many stores don’t automatically re-order a book if it doesn’t sell more than a certain amount. If you are not a bookseller, you can still hand sell by just talking up the book to people. (Talk up their music, game, comic, play, and movie.)

11a) If you work in retail anywhere and your pal is a musician and you like their music: Try putting their album on at work! Who knows? Maybe someone will ask you who that swell band is? Your pal may gain a new listener!

12) Support their Indiegogo or Kickstarter or Patreon. For your other artist friends who are making movies, plays, albums, comics, indie video games support their crowdfunding or patreon effort. Really. You can totally afford the $5-10 level (even if you think the project is lame.) for a crowdfunding and $1 for patron. And it will really help them and boost morale.

13) Be a good literary citizen. If you are an author, remember to be a good literary citizen. Promote yourself, but also do stuff for the larger literary community. Participate and include others. There are many things you can do. You can organize events. You can pitch panels. You can show up to things. You can volunteer to be a judge for things or to moderate panels (be a good moderator if you do.) You can write essays about other works. Remember to extend past your own inner circle of friends to include people who you might not know. Being an artist is very hard. There are many ups and downs in a career. At some point everyone goes through a hard time and needs help. Avoid the cool kids table mentality. Be kind. When you are on the top, don’t forget to keep helping your community. Diversify your literary and artistic world. (Other artists, you know what this is in your own field. Art citizens for the win!)

14) Invite your friend over to dinner. Or buy them dinner. Or have a potluck. Everyone could use a good night out with friends and conversation. It’s a spirit booster. No lie.

You have the power to be a great ART ALLY! Champion what you love. From all artists everywhere, I thank you for your support!

Random thought?? So Stan is a skilled artist in his own way, he creates taxidermy creatures and cobbles together various crafts. What if one of the tourists who comes in is a snooty gallery curator and sees the stuff around the Shack and is like “Mr. Pines, this is exactly the kind of avant-garde outsider art my gallery is looking for. There is a certain je ne sais quoi to these, and people will pay a hefty sum for these eccentricities”  “Don’t know what Juno says quack is but you had me at ‘hefty sum’. So that’s how  Stan gets to be in an art gallery with all his stuff on display everywhere. He drinks a lot of wine, and eats all the fancy cheeses, and wrangles patrons. “My oh my, what is this delightfully quirky creature?” “What’s it look like, it’s literally a squirrel-duck. Lookin’ at it costs you five bucks.”  I mean, Stan being in a fancy art gallery opening (with his stuff being displayed) is hilarious to me for some reason?

I’ll be home soon- Klance Week Day 4

So I got inspired by @sevenfivetwo voltron k drama au. Now in no way is the things I have in this fic cannon in their AU, I just got inspired by it. Please enjoy.
Welcome Home

“Actually, I just miss you.” Keith smiled as he looked out the window of his hotel at the lit city beneath him. “It’s weird how it came to this didn’t it?”

“Yeah, I mean, 4 months ago I was being paid to kiss you and trying not to fall for you but I did, like we’re in some K-Drama.” Lance replied. “But you really miss me?”

“mmhm.” It was strange how he and Lance got to this point. His family wanted him to marry, but relationships were not something Keith did, so he hired Lance to help him. He paid him to go out with him, paying extra if he got hurt. It wasn’t serious at first but they got to know each other more and more and actual feelings started to develop. It took a while for them to actually admit it to each other but it happened. They were actually celebrating a real 100 days of dating before they knew it.

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Opening today—Gregory Crewdson at FRAC Auvergne, France

May 20, 2017

Gregory Crewdson exhibition “The Becket Pictures” at FRAC Auvergne opens today, May 20.

Gregory Crewdson does not take photos: he makes photos. The characters he stages are always played against type in compositions mired in an utterly silent world, suspended in a listless temporality, frozen like barely quivering sludge which seems to cloister the places and protagonists in a reality untouched by the contemporary era or by its typical devices.

Gregory will also be signing books today at 2:30PM CET at the FRAC Auvergne. Make sure to stop by!
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Image: Gregory Crewdson, Untitled, 2007, digital pigment print, 58 ½  ×  89 ½ inches (148.6 × 227.3 cm) © Gregory Crewdson.

So it was @whelvenwings​ birthday 2 days ago!!! I’m sorry this is so late, but I’d rather give my fave fanfic writer a good present instead of something rushed and icky. Life happens sometimes. 

ANYWAY happy belated (secret) birthday, Emily!

Castiel is an art student.

He wears hole-y jeans and hoodies in bright colors. His hair is an untamable mess and he rarely remembers to shave. His nail beds are always – always ­– caked in paint. He doesn’t do well with structure or authority.

Dean is a literature student.

A deep thinker, a close reader, poised and ready for debate, impeccably and almost obsessively clean. He abhors tardiness. He likes beginnings, middles, and ends.

Which is why partnering the two of them together on an interdepartmental humanities project is probably a really bad idea.

Let’s go back to the beginning.

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