art feminism

I channeled some of my rage and despair into this piece today, it helped a little. To all my sisters marching tomorrow, stay safe, be aware of your surroundings but most importantly, show them that we will not be stopped, we will not conform. This battle rages on. Stay Angry, my friends.



EDIT: by popular demand, I made this illustration available as a print and other merchandise, if you’re interested please visit my soc6 page right over >>>> here <<<< thank you for all the love and support. And to all of you that are marching today with me, say it loud sisters, stay strong and stay safe!! <3

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Ohio bookstore shelves male-authored books backward to spotlight women

  • Ohio bookstore Loganberry Books is giving female authors the floor on International Women’s Day with a visual reminder of the publishing industry’s stunning gender disparity.
  • Starting on March 1, the staff began turning all male-authored books on the store’s hardcover and paperback fiction and poetry shelves backward, leaving only the spines of books by women visible.
  • Harriet Logan, the store’s owner, said the project serves the dual purpose of illustrating an injustice while simultaneously seeking to rectify it.
  • “By turning the books around, the whiteness of the page creates a different contour and color than what you’re used to seeing on a wall of books,” Harriet Logan said in a Wednesday interview.
  • “It’s also, of course, very easy to find women’s books because they jump off the selves. And browsing, you’re probably more likely to pick one up.” Read more (3/17/18 1:13 PM)
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Eve’s Glory series by A. Tamboly

A hundred years after the First World War, modern women demonstrate military prestige by donning vintage uniforms historically exclusive to men. Highlighting uniforms from the Second Industrial Revolution until the end of the Weimar Republic, Eve’s Glory compares the ceremonial attitudes historically associated with the military to the proud independence of modern women.

Military uniforms are symbols of heroic and elite social status. The authentic uniforms belong to officers from several countries, symbolizing the strict value system of the period from 1868 to the 1930s. If women had been granted the same status as men, how would they have been perceived? Would society focus on delicate femininity or strength? Melting away the barriers by integrating women into this masculine world, this project questions the gender divide.

I am interested in challenging the conventional ways in which females are visually presented. Women in fashion magazines, TV commercials, and mainstream films are usually dressed in a way that speaks to a structure of social expectations. Characterized by a sharp division between masculinity and femininity, dominance and passivity, toughness and delicacy, women are narrowly defined. A woman in uniform is a visual impossibility.

Showing the contrast between two different worlds—the masculine and the feminine—Eve’s Glory deals with unique characters regardless of age, health, and origin to show women who fought their way through life and the young women who strive for their own path.

—A. Tamboly