art as research

Tag Yourself as 18th Century Art Movements

Neoclassicism

  • read Percy Jackson & now thinks they know everything abt Ancient Greece
  • probably owns a sword or two
  • really dramatic but like. silently.
  • likes to stand on things to be impressive

Rococo

  • runs a pastel fashion blog
  • probably a secret weeaboo??
  • snapchat story is full of the dog filter and pictures of picnics
  • adorable but hella fragile

Romanticism

  • *dramatically looks into rainstorm* Life… is meaningless
  • didn’t get the memo that being emo isn’t in anymore
  • probably an english major
  • claims to like thunderstorms but will 100% hide under the bed when it thunders

Baroque

  • that loud and obnoxious kid in your class. u know the one.
  • claims to be the perfect christian
  • really dramatic and definitely not silently
  • will climb onto dangerous things just to be taller than Neoclassicism
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Women’s Art History Masterpost

In honor of International Women’s Day and Women’s History Month, feminist art scholar and research specialist at the Getty Research Institute, Anja Foerschner, selected key publications and journals for those want to explore art by women and feminist art.

The Feminist Art Journal (produced from 1972 to 1977).

The Power of Women and the Subversion of the Community by Mariarosa Dalla Costa and Selma James (1975).

Woman Artists 1550–1950 by Ann S. Harris (1977).

Chrysalis: A Magazine of Women’s Culture. (Produced from 1977 to 1980).
Free Download

Feminist Art Criticism: An Anthology by Arlene Raven, Cassandra Langer, and Joanna Ellen Frueh (1988).

Women, Art, and Power: And other Essays by Linda Nochlin (1988).

Women, Art, and Society by Whitney Chadwick (1990).

Art on My Mind: Visual Politics by Bell Hooks (1995).

Woven by the Grandmothers: Nineteenth-Century Navajo Textiles from the National Museum of the American Indian by Eulalie H. Bonar (1996).

Sexual Politics: Judy Chicago’s Dinner Party in Feminist Art History by Amelia Jones and Laura Cottingham (1996).

Beyond the Flower: The Autobiography of a Feminist Artist by Judy Chicago (1997).

Angry Women by Andrea Juno and V. Vale (1999).

Lesbian Art in America: A Contemporary History by Harmony Hammond (2000).

Black Feminist Cultural Criticism by Jacqueline Bobo (2001).

The Black Female Body: A Photographic History by Deborah Willis and Carla Williams (2002).

Art/Women/California, 1950–2000: Parallels and Intersections by Diana Burgess Fuller and Daniela Salvioni (2002).

Dark Designs and Visual Culture by Michele Wallace (2004).

Into Performance: Japanese Women Artists in New York by Midori Yoshimoto (2005).

WACK!: Art and the Feminist Revolution by Cornelia Butler and Lisa Gabrielle Mark (2007).

The Color of Stone: Sculpting the Black Female Subject in Nineteenth-Century America by Charmaine A. Nelson (2007).

Chicana Art: The Politics of Spiritual and Aesthetic Altarities by Laura E. Pérez (2007).

Ana Mendieta by María Ruido (2008).

Visual and Other Pleasures by L. Mulvey (2009).

Modern Women: Women artists at the Museum of Modern Art by Cornelia H. Butler and Alexandra Schwartz (2010).

EyeMinded: Living and Writing Contemporary Art by Kellie Jones (2011).

Women Building History: Public Art at the 1893 Columbian Exposition by Wanda M. Corn, Charlene G. Garfinkle, and Annelise K. Madsen (2011).

After the Revolution: Women Who Transformed Contemporary Art by Eleanor Heartney, Helaine Posner, Nancy Princenthal, Sue Scott, Linda Nochlin (2013).

Visualizing Guadalupe: From Black Madonna to Queen of the Americas by Jeanette Favrot Peterson (2014).

Live Form: Women, Ceramics, and Community by Jenni Sorkin (2016).


We want this list to grow, so please reblog with your favorite resources on art by women and feminist art.

sharpington  asked:

when you reblogged that face tutorial you mentioned you rarely see your hairline depicted in art--which hairline is that? I've never thought to pay attention to them before

Hey hey!! I’m so glad you posed this question!!

Hairlines aren’t really extensively talked about in terms of design, and I find that people just tend to use the same old ‘rounded’ or ‘squared-off’ hairlines when designing characters, ignoring the fact that natural hairlines are just as diverse as our other facial features. We lack proper language to describe them, and outside of the black natural hair community, people often don’t give hairlines a thought until they start to go bald. This problem with lack of terminology actually made it hard for me to find good reference for you!!

My hairline actually isn’t that rare in East Asian ethnicities, yet because it’s undesirable and doesn’t conform to beauty standards, no one ever depicts it in art save for a very select few that make it a part of their distinct style. The two artists that immediately come to my mind are illustrators Hayashi Seiichi and He Jiaying. Here is an excerpt from a Hayashi illustration:

And one from He Jiaying:

(He’s illustrations actually helped me come to love my hairline, after years of hiding it and being ashamed of it. Nowdays I don’t stare at my hairline in the mirror, feeling insecure and self-conscious, fervently wishing I could make my baby hairs grow thicker. I now rock a bun nearly daily. Representation matters!!)

My hairline was once described to me as ‘a variation of the classic straight’- though it looks normal when my hair is down, when it’s pulled up, two sharp triangles of baby hair immediately make themselves distinctly visible, too short to get pulled back along with the rest. These two patches right above the temples are thin and fluffy, different in texture to the rest of the scalp.

Here are some examples I yanked from the internet. Pay attention to how the patches of baby hair are visible only when the hair is pulled back:

You can even see it in some of the selfies I’ve posted onto tumblr, lmao!! (#truffs face) My mother, grandmother and both blood related aunts (all entirely Korean) share this hairline with me. It’s entirely genetic, very common and nothing we should be ashamed of.

Now that I’ve embraced my hairline, whenever I draw myself or my characters who share this trait, I tend to deliberately draw in these patches of thinner hair, making sure to pay attention to the directional pull of the strands and visually communicate that it’s less full in these areas. I know my own insecurity made me hyper-aware of hairlines since youth, and normally people don’t pay attention to them at all. But I still objectively feel that they are an important feature of how a head is designed overall, and mine is a distinct physical aspect of myself, and I want people to know that I LOVE my hairline and I know that it’s worth being represented!!

Royalty AU - Crown Princess Marinette of the Dupain-Cheng Twin Kingdoms

Read the fic here

(Adrien, Alya, Nino, Chloé, Sabrina, Juleka, Rose, Nathaniel, Alix, Kim) (other classmates coming soon)

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I’ve been working on designs for a new project I was invited to. 

Mage Oikawa who wanders into the woods looking for a rare hearb and gets lost and meet the Forest’s Guardian, the Fairy King, Iwachan….. or smth xP

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The first time Nishinoya asked him out, Asahi’s insecurity made him question why somebody so optimistic would want somebody like him. Nishinoya decided to take this opportunity to help Asahi understand his reasons before he made his second attempt.

Asahi kept finding new notes long after they started dating and kept every single one as a reminder.

chibifox2002  asked:

Hello Bendy! What's your favorite thing to do? (I've never asked a question on a ask blog before so sorry if this question is kinda boring)

B: i only like you for your alcohol
MM: so… you still like me.
B: Piss off.

(FUN FACT: Back in the good ol’ mafia days,  if a gang wanted control over a business they would ask for half or more of the entire profit, bleed the business dry, and burn the place down if/when they went bankrupt. If the business owner did not comply to begin with, they would go after the owners family and torture/kill them, and if THAT didn’t go through to the owner, they would be assassinated. Or “whacked” as they liked to put it lmao. But the thing that Moon Man and Bendy have goin on is sort of a special case.
-Mod Moon Man)

protect him