art architecture design

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The Art of Mehdi Ghadyanloo

Mehdi Ghadyanloo (b. 1981) is an Iranian artist known for his utopian and philosophical paintings that interrogate universal human precepts such as fear, hope and loss. Through the portrayal of minimal heterotopic environments, surreal architectural arrangements, and the repeated use of symbolic elements such as stairs, balloons and aeroplanes, Ghadyanloo invites us to consider new realities and the shared universality of our existence.

Ghadyanloo has always lived in Iran and grew up on a farm during the Iran-Iraq war. The uncertain experiences of war and sanctions had a lasting effect on his psyche. Through his works Ghadyanloo subconsciously encapsulates and expresses a sense of suspension for an entire generation living in Iran. Although at times somber, Ghadyanloo’s work conveys hope that change can be effected, and it speaks with joy of what remains glorious in gloomy times.

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10

Emilio Ambasz

While many of the pioneers of green architecture could arguably be criticized as technocratic and dry, this has never applied to Emilio Ambasz. His concept of “green over gray” has been pushing the debate around sustainability forwards since the 1970s, but alongside this concept he has developed a critical approach to architectural meaning and form-making which competes with many of architecture’s more poetic practitioners. Ahead Vladimir Belogolovsky’s upcoming exhibition of Ambasz’s work, “Emilio Ambasz: Architecture Toward Nature,” which is on show at the Singapore’s Urban Redevelopment Center from February 6th – 28th, Belogolovsky shares his interview with the architect in ArchDaily’s “City of Ideas” column.

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Shinjuku Washington Hotel by Damjan Cvetkov-Dimitrov