art & queer culture

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High resolution posters of two Indigenous Queers taken during the Long Walk/forced removal/ relocation of the Diné to an internment camp located near Bosque Redondo, New Mexico in 1866. As with all our posters, feel liberated to print out and wheatpaste at will!

The photograph shows two Diné Nádleehí (translation: “the one is changing”), which is the equivalent to Indigenous Queer identity in contemporary culture. It is accompanied by text that challenges Western perspectives on homosexuality by asking the viewer to imagine the pre-“history” of terms and issues that have become relevant to contemporary Queer culture. In this case, it inserts an Indigenous narrative prior to genocide, colonization, health epidemics, and forced assimilation to Western notions that include but are not limited to gender, sexuality, sexual orientation, same-sex marriage, queer history, and romanticization of nature and masculinity/male identity.

R.I.S.E.:
Radical
Indigenous
Survivance &
Empowerment

https://facebook.com/RISEindigenous

Saturday 6–9 pm: Join us for a performance by A.R.M. employing photography, text, music, and movement inspired by the tableaux-style photography of PaJaMa (Paul Cadmus, Jared French, Margaret French), among other queer photographic archives of the 20th century. The three artists of A.R.M. mimic the poses of the models in these works as a way to connect to, and reimagine, pre-Stonewall histories from the vantage points of contemporary gay cultures, finding meaning, continuity, and critique in adopting positions from the past.

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If you are interested in comics, the paranormal, romance, queer female characters, or are a fan of my art, please consider purchasing my first printed comic, “Follow You into the Dark.” (props if you know what song I’m super obviously referencing!)

You can find it at my storenvy: arfranklinstein.storenvy.com 

huffingtonpost.com
These Beautiful Photographs Explore The Wide Spectrum Of Gender Identity
"As soon as we learn to understand, we can overcome the fear of the strange."

Our culture’s understanding of — or at least willingness to acknowledge — how diverse the range of human gender identities can be has evolved in recent years,thanks in part to an increase of visibility of these identities in popular culture. As a result, more and more people are living as their authentic selves and gender is being conceived of as a spectrum of identities, not a simple binary consisting of only “male” and “female.”

Demian DinéYazhi’
Untitled (For We'Wha), 2014

We’Wha (1849-1896)
Zuni Lhamana

When Europeans arrived in North America they were shocked that native peoples often interpreted gender differently from them. Not only were many cultures matriarchal, a great many tribes accepted three genders instead of only two. 

Zuni Pueblo, in western New Mexico, honored three genders before the coming of protestant missionaries. Men who chose not to become hunters and warriors became lhamanas, members of the alternative gender that bridged the other two. While they were initiated into male religious societies, they became crafts specialists and wore female garb. They were nonwarriors who moved freely in the male and female worlds.

We-wha was a Zuni lhamana who helped bridge his culture and that of Anglo-Americans. He was one of the first Zunis to experiment with new economic activities, something essential in the changing world of his day. He was a cultural ambassador for Zuni, traveling to Washington, D.C., where no one guessed he was not a woman in the many months he mixed with "high society” there. He assisted Anglo scholars who came to record the ways of his people, but he also resisted Anglo incursions when they seemed improper – once even ending up in jail. 

He was a deeply spiritual person… His photograph hangs in the tribal museum today, and gay Native Americans throughout North America remember him as a spiritual hero and guide.“  // –Robert Lentz

__________________________________________.

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Just letting all the interested vultures know that the shirts I made with prettydeadstuff‘s quote are now available with three new pride flags as promised (as well as notebooks and hardcover journals and pillows and stuff yaaaaay) I tried to add differently vulture-y things to the antlers that would match the flags - asexuality has feathers and beads, bisexuality has flowers (I hope people are okay with a kind of feminine touch to that, pink and purple are hard to find in nature, guys!) and transgender has teeth.

Next on my to-do is the aromantic flag, DONE, aromantics now have a nice mossy skull, putting the pansexual pride as the next on the list, and then possibly a nonbinary flag or something like that? These are quite easy to recolour so if any vultures wants a shirt with their specific identity, feel free to drop me an ask!

Aaaand as always a special thanks to Prettydeadstuff aka. mydogisanerd and all vultures should check out their blog if they haven’t already because pretty dead things isn’t that reason enough?

EDIT: -facepalms-

Link to the shirts, of course!

hi loves ❣️ need ur help!

i’m doing my final presentation for my WGST class and i need help from u guys! i’m focusing right now on queer girls alternative media on tumblr, since i grew up on here & it helped me SO MUCH in exploring my identity.

SO i am really looking for artists/admins/writers/etc who are queer girls + run lgbt centered blogs! if u would like to be included in my discussion/presentation, please LIKE this post or message me! here are the limitations of my discussion:

1. ya gotta **identify** as a girl — would love to highlight trans/nb girls FIRST

2. must be in middle/high school — due to our definition of a girl (under 18/hasn’t left for college)

3. obviously !!! nothing that depicts real/imagined/drawn NSFW images of someone under 18!

i wanna highlights all of your beautiful art + talk about how important you all are in comforting/validating young queer ppl on this platform. i will OF COURSE credit u in the presentation + promote your work on this blog!

message me if u have any questions! & reblogging this would definitely help!

anonymous asked:

Hello! I'm trying to find a christmas present for a friend. Do you happen to know any good books about LGBTQ art or artists? x

Here’s a few books that might be of interest:

I’m assuming you’re looking for non-fiction and I mostly focused on visual arts - let me know if that’s not what you were looking for!