arney

Brain Draining

Just like any control centre – such as a busy head office – the brain needs regular cleaning to stay healthy and functioning properly. Special cells called microglia act as vigilant cleaners, constantly patrolling the brain and mopping up any debris left by dead and damaged nerve cells. This process is captured in action here: the pink blob in the centre is an unwanted nerve cell being targeted by microglia (white spidery shapes) starting the clean-up. By studying brain samples from patients with epilepsy, scientists have discovered that the microglia in these patients’ brains seem to be ‘lazy’, ignoring dead cells and letting the debris pile up. In turn, this molecular garbage triggers an immune response that makes the resulting brain injury even worse. The researchers are now developing potential drugs that can kick the sluggish cleaners back into action and boost their effectiveness, leading to new epilepsy treatments in the future.

Written by Kat Arney

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2013 Ghiomo Inprimis Arneis

It’s spring time! Time for some lovely white wines, including this Arneis from Italy! Perfumed nose of peach, apricot, honeysuckle, almond, cider (oxidative notes), and a hint of capsicum.  Lots of ripe peaches and apricots on the palate with some oxidative almond notes. Cin cin!

3/5 bones

$$

Arneis

13% abv

Langhe (Piedmont), ITALY

Jason Arney Photography

My work is focused on landscapes and travel throughout Japan, however, I send the hazy summer months chasing matsuri (Japanese festivals) and that work has earned me some acclaim (featured at NatGeo exhibited). You may find more here: http://www.jasonarney.com/Galleries/Portfolio/Portfolio-Matsui/

jasonarney.tumblr.com

2013 Bruno Giacosa Roero Arneis DOCG

There’s been a bit of buzz around Arneis as one of the more widely discovered white Italian grapes of the hour. I’ve been known to enjoy a bottle of Arneis from time to time. White stone fruit on the nose with lemon, white and yellow florals, and phyllo dough. Lemons and donut peaches on the palate with nice minerality and acidity. 

3/5 bones

$$

Arneis

13% abv

Roero, ITALY

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The Alternative Comedy Experience: Series 2
2

Hi Arnie. Haha eto nga pala ung napaka kulit kong classmate sa English at Per Dev hahaha! *may crush sa akin yan eh* tsk bwahahaha varsity yan ng BU anak ng tokwa naman oh! Naks. Hahah! Salamat sa pagiging mabait sa akin! 😉 Ano ba? Speechless. Bye. 👅👅👊

Virtual Heartbeats

Your heart beats thousands of times a day, pumping blood round the body to provide oxygen and nutrients wherever they’re needed. Every single heartbeat happens as a result of a co-ordinated wave of biological electricity running through the nerves and muscles of the heart. If it’s disrupted, the results can be catastrophic. One way things can go wrong is known as ventricular fibrillation, where the signals activating the big muscles at the bottom of the heart – the ventricles – become chaotic, making it wriggle and squirm, rather than pumping in the proper way. To find out more about what happens during ventricular fibrillation, and whether it’s possible to predict and prevent it, researchers have developed this ‘virtual heart’ – a mathematical model based on measurements from rabbit hearts. It’s even possible to dose the virtual heart with virtual drugs, to find new ways to treat or prevent heart failure in the future.

Written by Kat Arney

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Mind Mushrooms

For hundreds of years scientists have tried to map the human brain, figuring out which bits do what. While they’ve made great progress in tracking down the parts responsible for vision, movement and other tasks, we still know little about how our brains store and retrieve memories. To keep things simple, researchers have turned to the fruit fly, Drosophila. Although they’re hardly insect Einsteins, fruit flies can still remember a few things and even be trained to do easy tasks, storing this information in specialised nerve cells in an area of the brain called the mushroom body. These images show the fly brain (purple), with nerve cells wiring into the mushroom bodies highlighted with a fluorescent green molecule. Studying the activity of these cells as the flies learn reveals that memories are consolidated in several different parts of the brain at once, and also retrieved together at a later date.

Written by Kat Arney

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