army medical center

From Producer Ann Marie Baldonado:

Terry always says it’s difficult to pick favorite interviews, and I totally agree.  I can’t even remember the interview I worked on this week or what we have booked for next week (That’s a slight exaggeration.  This week I worked on Jill Soloway.  Next week it’s Hasan Minaj.)  Still, I will try to point out a few interviews that I will always remember when forced to go through my mental archives.

David Rakoff 
A lot of public radio listeners will remember the late David Rakoff from his work on This American Life.  In 2001, he talked to Terry about his acting career, and being frustrated by the roles that were offered to him.  He said they would fall under two categories – “Jew-y McHebrew’ or ‘Fudgy McPacker.’  He did dramatic/hysterical renditions of the lines he remembered.  He was so funny, and elicited the much sought after Terry “snort.”  Now, I have laughed a lot while logging interviews on Fresh Air, but during this one, I had to stop logging because I was crying from laughing so hard.  Fresh Air replayed this part of the interview when Rakoff passed away too soon in 2012.

Thelma Schoonmaker 
I first stated booking film, TV, and theater interviews for Terry in the spring of 2005, so this is an early one.  Schoonmaker is the film editor who has worked with Martin Scorsese for over 40 years.  She has edited all of his films since Raging Bull in 1980.  She’s just this wonderful, thoughtful artist who works behind the scenes, plugging away, making great films.  Terry’s interview with her was one smart lady who loves movies talking to another smart lady who loves movies.

Originally posted by orwell

Mike Mills

I have loved booking directors, actors, and comedians early in their careers and watching their bodies of work grow.  People like Lena Dunham, Flight of the Conchords, and Hari Kondobolu come to mind. I have loved booking interviews with director Mike Mills over the years. We booked him after his first film Thumbsucker in 2005, then for his movies Beginners and 20th Century Women.  He is the ideal guest: open, smart, self-deprecatingly funny, and talks so well about how his work connects to his life, a favorite Fresh Air theme.  I feel their conversations about his films, that in reality are like love letters to his parents, end up leading to larger conversations between Terry and Mike,  about their parents who they have lost.

Originally posted by rizsahmed

Aziz Ansari and Alan Yang
This one is a little more current.  I am not alone in this but one of my favorite recent TV shows has to be Master of None.   Some of the episodes from that first season (Parents and Indians on TV) live on my list of favorite episodes of TV ever.  I loved hearing friends Aziz and Alan talk about their own lives and how they incorporated their experiences into the show.  Everyone loves Aziz; I am glad we were able to have Alan on too.  We should forever thank them not just for this show, but for their work on Parks and Recreation.  And this is just one of the interviews that covered these great, really personal shows based on the lives of a great comedian, sort of the antecedents of Louie.  I am glad in the last few years, we have featured interviews with people like Aziz and Alan, Donald Glover, Issa Rae, and Rachel Bloom.

Sacha Baron Cohen 
I am proud of booking this one.  Up until this point, Sacha Baron Cohen was very committed to staying in character as Borat while doing all the promotion of his movie.  We were so happy that he agreed to do Fresh Air as himself, thus revealing that he was this accessible, intelligent guy.  He was quick to slip into his Borat voice though.  We love when guests slip into their characters’ voices.

Originally posted by balaidegatoteam

Greg Marinovich and Joao Silva
It was a round about way to book an interview.  The movie The Bang Bang Club, starring Taylor Kitsch and Ryan Phillippe, told the story of a group of war photographers in South Africa during Apartheid.  We used the movie as an excuse to book an interview with Marinovich and Silva, two of the real photographers who inspired the film.  Both of them had lost dear friends to the work.  And both of them had been injured while trying to visually capture combat situations.  In fact,  Silva was recording his part of the interview from Walter Reed Army Medical Center; he had lost both of his legs in a land mine explosion in Afghanistan and was still recovering.  At one point, a nurse comes in to talk to Silva.  It was such a rare radio moment that we decided to leave it in the interview.  Terry has spoken to many war correspondents and photographers over the years. These interviews are inevitably harrowing, tragic, thoughtful, and moving.

Ann Marie Baldonado, Fresh Air producer 

PS. Ann Marie sometimes does interviews. Her latest was with SNL’s Sasheer Zamata.

Platon, Sgt. Tim Johannsen and his wife, Jacquelyne Kay, in a rehabilitation unit at Walter Reed Army Medical Center. Johannsen spent 2½ years at Walter Reed after losing both of his legs on his second tour in Iraq. 2008.

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SOLDIER STORIES: Celebrating the life of a Viking Raider.

The battlefield cross for fallen Raiders was displayed at the Celebration of Life ceremony remembering retired Master Sgt. Eden M. Pearl, at the Base Theater aboard Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, N.C., Feb. 19, 2016. Master Sergeant Eden M. Pearl deployed with Fox Company, 2nd Marine Raider Battalion, to Herat Province, Afghanistan, in 2009. His identification tags will be added to those of other fallen Raiders and displayed at U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Special Operations Command headquarters building aboard Stone Bay, N.C.

(Combat images are courtesy photos dated MAY 2009. Other photos by Sergeant Donovan Lee, 19 FEB 2016. Article by Sergeant Lia Gamero, 19 FEB 2016.)

During a Celebration of Life ceremony, family, friends and fellow Raiders gathered to honor the life and legacy of retired Master Sgt. Eden M. Pearl, at the Base Theater aboard Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, N.C., Feb. 19, 2016. Master Sgt. Pearl succumbed to his wounds on Dec. 20, 2015, more than six years after his vehicle was hit by an improvised explosive device while deployed to Herat Province, Afghanistan in 2009.

“He was one of those guys the Marines tell stories about in the Marine Corps, so I couldn’t wait to meet (him)” said Phillip Noblin, who met Pearl in 2002, when Pearl was his team leader at 2nd Force Reconnaissance Company, II Marine Expeditionary Force. “Just off the stories, I had built up this picture of this battle-ax swinging Viking of a beast of a man.”

By 2002, Pearl had already built himself a reputation as a force to be reckoned with in the reconnaissance community. He had deployed with the 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit, completed Amphibious Reconnaissance School, Scout Sniper School, and the Rigid-hull Inflatable Boat Coxswain’s Course.

“He was a very consummate professional, and commanded respect everywhere he went,” said Noblin, who described Pearl as a leader who always took the time to teach and train younger Marines. “(On his team) you always wanted to make sure you did the right thing because Eden was your team leader and you didn’t want to let him down.”

Pearl completed four more deployments with II MEF, in support of Operations Iraqi Freedom I and Iraqi Freedom II. It was shortly before his fifth deployment that Pearl was introduced to his wife, Alicia, a U.S. Navy corpsman stationed in Virginia. After a long-distance relationship, the two received orders to deploy with the same unit, but two months from deployment, Alicia found out she was expecting.

“He had a plan, to be together for some time, engaged for some time,” said Alicia, “but we both knew we were right for each other and we wanted to be together, so he was just so excited when he found out.”

The couple married days before his deployment and their daughter was born just two weeks before his return in 2005.

“(She) was his joy,” said Don Hoemann, long-time friend of Pearl. “He had this carrier that he bragged about continuously and did so much in-depth research on, and he’d carry her absolutely everywhere. He’d be up to his knees in muck, and she’d be on his back, hiking with him.”

In April 2005, Pearl then received orders to 2nd Special Operations Training Group, Special Missions Branch, as a Dynamic Assault/Entry Instructor.

“(When I arrived) Eden was kind of in charge over there, which was funny because on paper there was probably a (gunnery sergeant) over him,” said Noblin, founder of Brothers in Arms Foundation. “But he had that about him, you could be in a room with majors and captains, but if Eden was talking they were listening. He was the guy who had been there and knew all the skills, and at the time, that was with only 10 years in.”

Pearl was with the Special Missions Branch in 2006 when the unit was reassigned and re-designated at Marine Special Operations School (MSOS), U.S. Marine Corps Forces Special Operations Command. At MSOS, Pearl was assigned as Lead Instructor and was integral in the development of the Individual Training Course (ITC).

An explosive ordinance disposal technician with 3rd Marine Raider Support Battalion, who met Pearl in 2006 described Pearl as a very intense individual.

“His reputation as a recon Marine was already legendary with all of us, so in a way it was hard not to be in some kind of ‘awe’ when you first met the guy,” said the EOD tech. In 2008, he was assigned to Marine Special Operations Team 8211, Fox Company, 2nd Marine Raider Battalion, with Pearl as his team chief.
“Eden was (the team’s) anchor, our go-to guy with anything,” said the EOD tech. “We all would have followed him anywhere because we knew without a doubt that he would do the same for any of us.”

In 2009, MSOT 8211 deployed to Herat Province, Afghanistan. While on a routine convoy, Pearl’s team was ambushed and an IED was detonated directly under his vehicle. Two service members were ejected from the vehicle and survived, three others, including Pearl, were caught inside. Pearl was the only service member from inside the vehicle to survive.

“I don’t pray often, but that night I prayed it wasn’t one of our vehicles, and more specifically not his,” said the EOD tech. “As you can imagine, the entire team was caught pretty off guard to that kind of a blow; having that anchor, brother, leader and friend taken from you.”

Pearl suffered 2nd and 3rd degree burns to 97 percent of his body. He was medically evacuated from country and only days later to Brook Army Medical Center in San Antonio, Texas, where he underwent multiple surgeries and skin grafts. After a couple of months, Pearl had a severe stroke that put him into a temporary vegetative state, but after 16 months he was transferred to a facility in Florida, that catered to his cognitive care needs.

In 2013, the Brothers in Arms Foundation, together with the Gary Sinise Foundation, helped build a home in San Antonio that was accessible to care for Pearl in a home setting.

“I don’t think most people would have survived those initial injuries to begin with and the fact that he made it out of (Brook Army Medical Center) after 16 months is amazing, and the fact that he was even able to come home and spend more time with us here, is kind of miraculous,” said Alicia. “He truly was an incredible man, father and husband.”

Pearl’s wounds and recovery not only led to the development of multiple medicines but also several procedures that will help future burn victims. His survival was the leading factor for the Brothers in Arms foundation, which continues to support wounded and fallen special operations Marines. Alicia and Hoemann attribute his survival to his ceaseless warrior spirit.
“(Eden) was the epitome of a fighter, he was not going to give up,” said Hoemann. “Even with family and work it wasn’t an option to give up and not give 110 percent. He fought every day … for what he thought was best for his Marines and his family.”

Pearl was retired in September 2014, where he continued to live in San Antonio with his family, until his passing on Dec. 20, 2015. He is survived by his wife Alicia, daughter Avery, and a community of Raiders with an example to live up to.

“I only wish that more guys coming up through MARSOC could have been influenced by him,” said the EOD tech. “(Eden) was a full package deal that could do it all. I will never forget the moments that I had with him, to know him, and have the honor to work beside him.”

Veterinary X-Ray Procedure - 1918

Dog having radiographs taken at veterinary hospital in Dijon, France.

Dijon was one of the first hospitals outside of Roentgen’s own labs to integrate x-ray technology as a regular part of diagnostic testing. Though the first x-rays of humans were taken in 1895 and x-ray therapy was used (in the most crude form) since the early 1900s, the diagnostic value of the imaging procedure was not widely regarded in the United States until well into the 1930s.

From National Museum of Medicine Archives.

Remember this next time you walk up to
the ticket window of your local movie
theater with $10 in your hand.
The Media (accidentally?) missed this one!
Please read this: The troops overseas would
like you to send it to everybody you know.

Subject: Denzel Washington and Brooks
Army Medical Center.
Don’t know whether you heard about this but
Denzel Washington and his family visited the troops at Brooks Army Medical Center in San Antonio, Texas, (BAMC) the other day. This
is where soldiers who have been evacuated
from Germany come to be hospitalized in
the United States , especially burn victims.
There are some buildings there called
Fisher Houses. The Fisher House is a hotel
where soldiers’ families can stay, for little
or no charge, while their soldier is in the hospital. BAMC has quite a few of
these houses on base, but as you can imagine, they are almost filled most of the time.
While Denzel Washington was visiting
BAMC, they gave him a tour of one of
the Fisher Houses. He asked how much one
of them would cost to build. He took his checkbook out and wrote a check for the
full amount right there on the spot.
The soldiers overseas were amazed to hear
this story and want to get the word out to the American public, because it warmed
their hearts to hear it. 
The question is - why do:
Britney Spears, Lindsay Lohan, 
Paris Hilton,

Tom Cruise

and other Hollywood fluff

make front page news with their ridiculous antics, and Denzel Washington’s Patriotism doesn’t even make page 3 in the Metro
section of any newspaper except the
local newspaper in San Antonio !?

Thinkin it’s kind of a slap in the face as a veteran with PTSD that Wounded Warrior Project focuses exclusively on combat veterans and the reason is that I’m a veteran and I’m wounded and it was while on active duty and I’m a Wounded Warrior why am I being ignored.

Injured veterans deserve help, and they deserve public support. All of us.

I’m not less of a Wounded Warrior because my PTSD doesn’t have “combat-stress related” tacked on to the end of it. I’m a Wounded Warrior because a man who was supposed to be my brother in arms raped me. Doctors decided I was not fit for deployment because I exibited symptoms of post traumatic stress disorder that the president of Madigan Army Medical Center instructed the mental health department to not diagnose servicemembers with (2012).

My pain is not less important, and I should not be invisible so that the US can define what their martyrs should look like.

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She’s an angel!!!

Singer Stevie Nicks, along with 27 Medal of Honor recipients, was honored in Washington DC last evening at the USO-Metro’s 33rd Annual Awards Dinner.  Nicks was acknowledged for having spent the most hours visiting combat-wounded servicemen and women. The award was presented to Nicks by Cpl Vincent Mannion-Brouder who was in a coma for over a year.  Nicks has stayed in touch with Mannion-Brouder and his family over the years as he continued his stunning recovery.

As part of USO Metro’s Celebrity Handshake Tour, Nicks also donated hundreds of iPods she personally programmed with music to the returning vets who she spent time with during their recovery at Walter Reed Army Medical Center and Bethesda Naval Medical Center over several years.