army in afghanistan

6

They have no rights,
they go thought bullying every single day.
they got Illegally occupied,
they got kicked out of their own Houses,
they got kicked out of their own Lands.
.
Bombs are being dropped at their Houses.
they are being arrested,
they are being tortured,
they will probably get locked up in Prisons for Years.
~
And they did nothing wrong.
We all know they are not guilty.
.
They go through all this only because they believe one word. - La ilaha illallah.
.
They are going through all this and still smiling!
They lost everything, expect Honor.
You can’t scare them.
We are a people who fear none but Allah

NPR journalists David Gilkey and Zabihullah Tamanna died a year ago this week, ambushed on a remote road in southern Afghanistan while on a reporting assignment traveling with the Afghan National Army.

Since their deaths, NPR has been investigating what happened, and today we are sharing new information about what we learned. It’s a very different story from what we originally understood.

The two men were not the random victims of bad timing in a dangerous place, as initial reports indicated. Rather, the journalists’ convoy was specifically targeted by attackers who had been tipped off to the presence of Americans in Afghanistan’s Helmand province.

Gilkey, an experienced photojournalist, and Tamanna, an Afghan reporter NPR hired to work with him, were sitting together in a Humvee when they were attacked.

“After the loss of our colleagues, we wanted to be sure we understood what really happened on the road that day,” said Michael Oreskes, senior vice president of news and editorial director at NPR. “So we kept reporting.”

Not A Random Attack: New Details Emerge From Investigation Of Slain NPR Journalists

Illustration: Isabel Seliger for NPR
Caption: Journalists David Gilkey and Zabihullah Tamanna were killed on the road to Marjah, Afghanistan, last year during a reporting trip.