army chemical corps

3

One of the munitions we had in Vietnam was filled with small sub-munitions about the size of a D-cell flashlight battery. Each munition had 256 of these small sub-munitions. When dropped from a helicopter, each one would cover an area the size of a football field with a thick cloud of [riot control] agent. The munition was so popular with the fighting troops on the ground that we couldn’t get enough of them to fill all requests. 

Being a bright young guy, I invented a munition made from RCA [riot control agent] grenades (grenades weren’t in great demand because you had to be within throwing distance from the enemy to use them, and soldiers don’t like to get THAT close to the enemy if not necessary!). I filled wooden boxes with grenades, each of which had the “pin” pulled and the handle held in place by it’s packing container. I rigged the box so it would fall apart just above the ground when dropped from the right altitude in a helicopter. The grenades would then spill out, fall out of their packing containers, and start burning. Each of these munitions, which I called a BFOG, pronounced “Beefhog” for “Box Full of Grenades,” would also cover a football-sized area. 

I received an Army Commendation Medal for inventing that munition, and we had a hard time making enough of them to keep up with demand.

Captain P.F. Brake, US Army Chemical Corps