armored boar

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Greek Bronze Helmet of Apulo-Corinthian Type, Southern Italy, 4th Century BC

Representing the later style of the characteristic Corinthian form, this is an example of personal armor worn by the Italic Greeks around the 4th century BC.  It is skillfully constructed from hammered sheet bronze, the domed form features a broad top flange, with high-arching, M-shaped eyebrows in raised relief.  To the back of the helmet, the nape is flared both to allow the soldier to move freely and to protect him from the blows of the enemy but this helmet features a piercing at each end the of neck-guard to secure it by means of a chinstrap.  Across the crown are rivets and plates for the attachment of either a horsehair crest, or menacing metal animal horns. It is abundantly decorated with incised chevrons around the eyes and nose-guard, there is a border of zigzags to the rim and two large, confronting boars decorate the joined cheek pieces.

However, unlike its Corinthian cousin, the small eye holes and nose-guard are purely decorative, for this helmet was designed to be worn, cap-like, on top of the head rather than covering the face.  Greek art has many depictions of Gods and Heroes wearing their Corinthian tilted up even when battle began, and this practice gave rise to the Apulo helmets.  Innovation and comfort aside, this transformed style further allowed the warriors of the Italic Peninsula to still liken themselves to the warriors and Gods depicted in art; celebrating their favored stories that even today, holds strong appeal to our modern taste in sculpture.