armenian genocide recognition

On April 24, 1915, exactly 100 years ago today, the Armenian Genocide began.

The mass liquidation of an estimated 1.5 million Armenians in the Ottoman Empire was brought to fruition by the Young Turk government. At least 80% of the Armenian Ottoman population was marched to the Syrian desert and perished.

Turkey has denied the genocide’s existence ever since. Today, it is still an unrecognized event. Obama has officially stated he will not recognize it as a genocide to secure ties with Turkey, and many other countries follow suit. 

On the eve of World War II, Hitler justified his own similar actions by stating, “Who, after all, speaks today of the annihilation of the Armenians?” The denial of the Armenians inspired Hitler’s own genocidal Holocaust, and every genocide after.

For the sake of all genocide prevention, it is vitally important these injustices are recognized. The Armenians are not invisible.

Today is Armenian Genocide Remembrance day, so today should be focused on Armenian Genocide. 

But of course, the simultaneous and equally horrible genocides of the Anatolian Greek and Assyrian populations by the Ottoman Empire should not be forgotten today, nor any day, nor should they be completely removed from the context of Armenian Genocide. These genocides happened simultaneously to the Armenian Genocide, and were instituted under the same Young Turk agenda of ethnic cleansing of minorities to achieve a Pan Turanist racially pure nation. 

Greeks both in Anatolia and in independent Greece were friends and champions of their Armenian neighbors, far and distant, both during the war and after

Do not forget that it was the Greeks who fought for an Armenian Mandate to be kept in the Treaty of Sevres when the US government became cold from the idea of “interference in the Middle East” following the war. 

Do not forget that both Greece and Cyprus are two of the very few countries today that officially recognize the Armenian Genocide. 

Pontic Greek Genocide Remembrance day is May 19, and on that day I know Armenians will commemorate the loss of 1 million Greeks to genocide just as today Greeks around the world commemorate the loss of >1.5 million Armenians. 

UPDATE: Awesome news for Armenian Genocide Centennial!

Hello all, while there has been some frustrating news these past couple of days (President Obama refusing to use the “G” word), there have also been some great improvements!

  • Google will change its logo tomorrow (April 24th, 2015) to have a black ribbon in honor of the Armenian Genocide. This will bring a huge influx of people to learn about the Armenian Genocide who would have never had heard of it before.
  • The 1.5 million murdered Armenians were canonized today in Armenia at the church Etchmiadzin, making all of those martyrs saints.
  • Representative of USA from Southern California Adam Schiff (D), read the names of 1,000 Armenian victims during his one hour on the House Floor. This is monumental! It’s really a slap on Obama’s face.
  • Turkey stopped Serbian leader Milorad Dodik from flying through Turkey to Armenia. This news is awesome, because it brings awareness to Turkey’s childishness!
  • Austria recognized the Armenian Genocide! Following its recognition, Turkey pulled its ambassador from Austria (losers).
  • On Wednesday, California State Aseembly PERSS committee voted to divest the State of California’s investments in the Turkish government! This is following the footsteps of multiple universities in California such as UCLA and UCB, who have done so already.

If you know of any more exciting updates over the past week, please let me know and I will edit this post!

the armenian genocide was NOT the first genocide of the twentieth century. overlooking for one moment the erasure of the essentially simultaneous assyrian and greek genocides, the genocide of the herero and nama peoples in what was then german south-west africa was the first genocide of the twentieth century. armenian genocide recognition should NOT be at the expense of other persecuted peoples.