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Paintings of Ani (medieval capital of Armenia)

by Arshak Fetvadjian

After Fetvadjian completed his studies in Europe, he traveled to eastern Armenia. He organized several art exhibitions displaying his own works in such major Transcaucasian cities as Batum, Tiflis and Baku. In the early 1900s, Fetvadjian had the opportunity to participate in the excavations led by Russian archaeologist Nicholas Marr of the medieval Armenian capital of Ani, a city which boasted several of the most outstanding examples of Armenian architecture of the High Middle Ages. Some of his most memorable works come from the watercolor paintings of the chapels, palaces, churches and monasteries at Ani which are “factual and literal depictions of the buildings.”

Read more about Fetvadjian

about my country

TODAY IS THE NATIONAL WATER FIGHT DAY IN ARMENIA

ITS LIKE A DAY WHEN THE WHOLE COUNTRY COMES OUT AND STARTS TO POUR WATER ON EACH OTHER

ITS COMPLETELY OKAY TO POUR WATER ON EVERY SINGLE STRANGER YOU SEE

WE CALL THIS DAY VARDAVAR

YOU WONT BE ABLE TO GET HOME DRY TODAY

ITS INTENSE

ITS SO MUCH FUN

WATER EVERYWHERE ON THIS HOT SUMMER WEATHER IS LIKE A BLESSING

YOU SEE A DRY STRANGER? GO AND POUR THEM WITH WATER

i mean last year i was to go to buy bread and i got poured with ice cold water 3 times and the 4th guy was about to pour water on me but he saw i’m soaked so he shrugged and ran away

it’s the most fun day of the year

oh my god today’s gonna be great

-Meli (aka @ Newtporn)

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Turkey: Few Traces of Armenian Past To Be Found a Century Later 

For Armenians, the towns of Muş (Moush) and Sason (Sasun) in southeastern Turkey, not far to the west of Lake Van, hold particular historical significance. But today, 100 years after the genocide of 1915, few ethnic Armenians still remain there.

In the medieval era, Muş served as the central town of the influential Armenian principality of Taron, home to Mesrop Mashtots, who invented the Armenian alphabet in the early fifth century. Sason, known to Armenians as Sasun, is the setting for the 8th-10th-century Armenian national epic, “The Daredevils of Sasun" (also called “The Daredevils of Sassoun"), which tells how Armenian fighters, led by the legendary ruler, David of Sasun (or Sassoun), repulsed repeated Arab invasions.

Although both locations lost their prominence in modern times, they remained important regional centers for Armenian culture until the bloodshed of 1915. Today, little sign of that past remains. The old part of Muş, where many ethnic Armenians once lived, has been partly destroyed, though the walls of a women’s hamam and an Armenian church still stand. Khachkars, Armenian memorial cross-stones, stand near many Kurdish houses. Stones with carved crosses often have been used for construction materials. A graveyard can be found on a nearby mountain.

Recently, an Armenian club opened in Muş with the name “Daron - Hay,” a local Armenian rendition of “Taron-Armenian.” Members say they chose the Armenian word “Hay” since the Turkish word for Armenia, Ermeni, can be used as an insult. Members say, though, that those attitudes are starting to change a little. But still, despite a relative liberalization of government policies in recent years, many ethnic Armenians in Turkey remain cautious.

The desire to retain an Armenian cultural identity, though, runs strong. One Muslim ethnic Armenian told a visiting Armenian photographer about his family’s difficulty in finding their relatives in Armenia, where they fled after the massacre of 1915. But in both Muş and Sason/Sasun, only the older generation of ethnic Armenians speak Armenian. Youngsters say they try to learn the language while attending school in Istanbul, where more opportunities exist to study Armenian.

Istanbul and other larger Turkish cities also have drawn away most of the local ethnic Armenian families who are Christian; a faith seen as an integral part of Armenian culture. Many of those who remain are Muslim, while others are mixed. A few have converted to Christianity. Marriage is viewed as a key tool in preserving these families’ Armenian heritage within Turkey. To do so, some locals often even opt for distant relatives as spouses. Still, their focus remains on the future. One Muslim Armenian man discussed the prospects for a bride for his son. The father’s hope is that she will be Armenian.

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anonymous asked:

Can you tell me a bit about Armenia?

um, sure! I don’t really know where to start cause the country has a very rich history, but lemme try👏

so, Armenia is a pretty mountainous (really tiny) country in South Caucasus. Just to prove it, I claim that I live on a hill. In Armenia you can see hills everywhere. It has its own language known as Armenian and its own alphabet - ԱաԲբԳգ

Our flag is three horizontal stripes of colours. Red - representing all the blood that Armenian nation poured throughout centuries to gain independence as well as the color of national fruit Pomegranate. Blue - the peaceful sky of Armenia. Orange - the color of wheat which represents hard work and also the color of another national fruit - Apricot 

Armenia is thousands of years old. It had periods in history when it was huge and powerful and naturally it was the center of many wars and battles. We happen to be not in very good terms with the two of our neighbors - Turkey and Azerbaijan because of early historical conflicts.

One of these conflicts is very important to mention. The Great Armenian Genocide in 1915. Formal Turkish government had planned to simply get rid of my country, destroy it as if it never existed. That is when 1.5 million innocent Armenian people (including kids and women and elders) were brutally murdered and banished from their motherland.

When I say brutally - I mean it. My great-grandmother had to escape from Armenia when she was 6 years old, all alone, wandering in piles of corps and blood and rotten disjointed bodies ((please excuse me for putting those pictures up, but I had to illustrate my words. I tried to choose the less disturbing ones))

the thing with this is that the modern Turkish government denies the fact of genocide. They refuse to give us back the lands and fortune they stole exactly one hundred years ago. But we will fight until we find justice! This is a very very emotional topic for each and every Armenian you will meet.

It is also important to mention our religious side. Armenia was the very first country in the whole world that accepted Christianity as its official religion. My country is full of ancient and new churches. You can find them everywhere and they are truly breathtaking.

Armenian kitchen is pretty amazing. We have many dishes that no one else has. The names are kind of weird for foreigners - Dolma, Mantee, Lahmajun, Khorovats, Lavash, Khash, Sujukh, Bread With Jingial etc, but trust me, they taste heavenly.

Armenia has astonishing nature! The color and freshness and beauty of this place will leave you speechless!

some famous Armenians:

The Kardashians (tv stars)

SOAD - System Of a Down (rock band)

Cher (singer)

Adam Sevani (actor, dancer)

Henrikh Mkhitaryan (footballer)

Armenia’s capital city is Yerevan. I especially love it at night.

I have so so so much more to say about my beautiful homeland. I always complain about it being tiny and unnoticed and faraway, but the truth is that I love this place more than I ever loved anything. I hope this wasn’t boring for all my followers to read. I’m glad that now you know so much about a place that means so much to me.

-with love, Meli (aka @Newtporn)

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Վահան Խաչատրյան
 Vahan Khachatryan 

A young talented and respected designer that has set higher standards for the Armenian fashion industry the last couple of years.

 Vahan was born in Armenia in a loving and artistic family and by having his grandfather who passed away before his birth as his greatest inspiration due to all the beautiful paintings that the talented artist left behind Vahan started creating unique and sophisticated designs for his famous celebrity friends at a very young age. He soon realised that his talent was unique but his technique needed to be sharpened, and the young designer traveled to one of the best fashion schools in Italy located in Florence to perfect his skills. Later on upon graduating in 2011, Vahan got an invitation to work with Dolce & Gabanna and by accepting this offer, he opened up doors for him that gave a new life to his priorities in the fashion world.

After working with Dolce & Gabanna, Vahan opened his Couture Atelier in Yerevan and is now presenting new astonishing couture collections twice a year by resetting the old Armenian fashion values.  By getting inspired by Italian baroque and French rococo Vahan is continuesly chocking the fashion industry by creating jaw-dropping dresses and puts Armenia’s name on the global fashion table. 

The brand “ Vahan Khachatryan” was founded in 2013 and is the only clothing brand in Armenia to collaborate with the best fabric and lace manufactures in Europe providing superior quality in products. The team for the unique textile designes works passionately for the brand creating beautiful fabric patterns and motives that are required for the amazing creations that are exclusive in their quality and design as a huge attention is paid to every single detail on each piece to achieve perfection. Vahan Khachatryan represents an unmistakable fashion presence in the Armenian fashion world with a recognisable touch which is impossible to confuse.

In march 2015 Vahan presented his new fashion collection at the Mercedes Benz Fashion Week in Kiev and made it to the Ukrainan Vogue magazine with his beautiful creations and closed his fashion show with all the models wearing dresses that had a “ I remember and demand” and “1915-2015” printed text on front and back of the dresses in different languages by recalling the Armenian Genocide.

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Yezidi Kurds of Armenia

Yezidi Kurds are the largest ethnic and religious minority in Armenia. Many Yezidis came to Armenia and Georgia during the 19th and early 20th centuries to escape religious persecution under the Ottoman Turks and the Sunni Muslim Kurds. The Yezidis were massacred alongside the Armenians during the Armenian Genocide, causing many to flee to Russian held parts of Armenia.  According to the 2011 Census, there are about 35,272 Yezidis in Armenia.

(click on photos to see the captions)

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