armed-forces

November 10, 1775: The U.S. Marine Corps Is Founded

On this day in 1775, the U.S. Marine Corps was founded. The birthplace of the Marines is tied to the Tun Tavern on Water Street in Philadelphia, which was used as a recruiting headquarters for the Revolutionary War in November of 1775. The Corps was later abolished at the war’s end, for economic reasons, and reestablished on July 11.

The Marine Corps celebrated its new birthday, or Marine Corps Day, on July 11 from 1799 until 1921. In 1921, the date was permanently changed to November 10 to commemorate the establishment of the Corps to aid in the Revolutionary War.

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Photo: Couresy of USMC War Memorial Night by Catie Drew.

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Sky High

U.S. Marines assigned to Force Reconnaissance Platoon, Maritime Raid Force, 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), conduct a high altitude low opening (HALO) jump during category 3 sustainment training in Louisburg, N.C., June 2, 2015. The training allowed the Marines to practice proper techniques and procedures while in preparation for deployment to the 5th and 6th Fleet area of responsibility later this year. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Andre Dakis/26th MEU Combat Camera/Released)

Arlington National Cemetery 

U.S. Army Capt. Ed Arntson of Chicago, Illinois kisses the grave of Staff Sgt. Henry Linck, who was killed in Iraq in 2006. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Memorial Day is a United States holiday observed on the last Monday of May. Formerly known as Decoration Day, it commemorates U.S. Service Members who died while in the military service. First enacted by formerly enslaved African-Americans to honor Union soldiers of the American Civil War, it was extended after WWI to honor Americans who have died in all wars. (Wiki)