are you a wizard

okay, okay, hear me out:

what if the boy who lived was the girl who lived? scruffy tomboy harriet “call me Harry” potter, getting extra rubbish from the Dursleys both from being a girl and being the wrong kind of girl

and absolutely nothing in the entire 7-book series changes except for pronouns. because girls can be brave and imperfect and angry and sulky and loud just like boys can.

(except a girl harry would room with Hermione Granger and the Patil twins instead of Ron and Sean, but that’s literally the only thing I can think of that might change)

vimeo

The part I worked on for the @tazanimated project 2017 with some friends.

Magnus, Taako and Merle animated by Darragh Herlihy - http://twitter.com/darragherlihy
Comp by Helga Kristjana Bjarnadóttir - http://twitter.com/helgadrawsstuff
Additional coloring: Donna McAvoy & Sonia Naqvi - Soniadoodles.tumblr.com/

Storyboard, character designs, backgrounds and Magic Brian animation by me: Sandra N. Andersen - Drulidoodles.tumblr.com - twitter.com/Drulidoodles

since it seems to be the consensus that being the weird girl is lesbian culture i think we can all agree that harper from wizards of waverly place was a lesbian

anonymous asked:

do you have twitter :o

I do and I post about very serious things such as

When The Bard Uses Polymorph

Context : We’re all level 8 in the middle of a battle between the party and a group of Fomorians and giants. I, playing a Wizard who’s a little too brave for his own good, cast fly on myself and close in on a Fomorian who tried to run away. Once at the end of my fly speed, I drank a potion of fire breathing.

DM : It is now Mestipen’s (Bard) turn.

Mestipen : I want to call out Leocanto (me) “Hey, Leo! Check this out.” And I want to start playing a rendition of the Jurassic Park theme on my Lute and cast Polymorph to change Leocanto into a Tyrannosaurus Rex. 

DM : Does Leocanto resist?

Me : Never even crossed my mind.

DM : Okay. You are now a flying, fire breathing T Rex roaring in the face of a Fomorian who looks VERY afraid.

Me : *ooc* God I love D&D.

as the seventh month dies

based on this post

The first time Lily sees her, it’s a week after Dumbledore told them.

Tight smiles and curt nods from one side of the room to the other, not daring to come closer, not daring to speak — it still hurts, just thinking about it, let alone talk.

Still, the night goes by and, soon enough, they find themselves standing next to each other.

They share a sad smile, and Alice’s hand finds hers, fingers intertwined and squeezing, if only for a second.

It’s not a “that’s okay”, not even close to an “everything will be all right”. It won’t, that much she knows.

But, in that moment, Lily feels less alone.

We were playing a home brew based on Pathfinder. The DM was describing the setting to us in the first session.

DM: All spontaneous magic users like sorcerers and bards are added to noble families…

Rogue (OOC): Wait, bards? Really?

DM: Yeah, of course!

Rogue (OOC): Since when are bards magic?

DM: Their music has an effect on reality. That didn’t tip you off?

Rogue (OOC): I just thought this whole time that people hear the music and get really psyched up.

Druid (OOC): There’s a guy at the bar playing a flute. Bring him! “Wait I’m not a bard! I just play the flute!” I said bring him!

10 Books to read this autumn & Halloween🍁🍂🍁

1.The Lie Tree by Frances Hardinge

It’s spooky,  it’s smart, thematic and has splashes of the otherworldly but it’s mostly a historical mystery

Originally posted by gertieparr

2. Tangleweed and Brine by Deirdre Sullivan

This is a collection of twelve fairytale retelling it’s Witchy, subversive and lyrical, it’s a bit dark but not to bad, it’s an ideal autumn read.

Originally posted by aningeniousuniverse

3. The Strange Case of the Alchemist’s Daughter by Theodora Goss 

This is a retelling inspired from the classic horror stories of: Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, Sherlock Holmes, Van Helsing, Dracula (Mr. Renfield,) Frankenstein, Rappaccini’s daughter, and Dr. Moreau.  it’s a very Interesting read if you love the Classics and a perfect read for Halloween.

Originally posted by myfinalwords

4. The Accident Season by Moïra Fowley-Doyle

This is a ideal book for reading and re-reading every autumn, Come October, seventeen-year-old Cara and her family – including her mother, older sister and ex-stepbrother – board up the windows and hide the sharp implements in preparation for the Accident Season, a month in which mysterious and dangerous things seem to constantly befall them. A spellbinding magical realism standalone, it’s full of tarot cards, masquerade balls, fortune-telling, dreams, hallucinations and hazy, stylish prose. If you’re looking for an atmospheric autumnal read, this is absolutely the book to go for. 

Originally posted by night-young


5.Harry potter by jk Rowling

Let’s face it you can’t have Halloween with out harry potter, with it’s wizards and witch’s, it’s magic spells and potions, it’s monsters and just overall feeling of autumn in this series it’s a must read.

Originally posted by gorunwithsissors


6. Murder Most Unladylike by Robin Stevens

The Murder Most Unladylike Mysteries are one of those series you know is relatively recent but which seems like it’s been around for ages. It has that classic but accessible touch which makes it appealing to kids and brings something older readers or adults can appreciate, too. 

Originally posted by xbunnyclawsx

7. All the Crooked Saints by Maggie Stiefvater.

Here is a thing everyone wants:
a miracle; here is a thing everyone fears:
what it takes to get one.Enchanting writing and complex characters interwoven into a tale of love, darkness, fear and redemption.

Originally posted by ullathynell

8. A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith

Why so perfect for fall? The emphasis on education makes this feel especially appropriate to read during back-to-school season.
This turn of the century coming-of-age story is an American classic for good reason. The beautifully crafted tale pulls you into Francie’s story and has you rooting for her as she grows up in challenging circumstances. There is an undercurrent of hope that buoys everything

Originally posted by spacefairytales


9. And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie

One of Agatha Christie most famous mysteries, the eerie setting, and countdown of survivors makes for a satisfying mystery with a slightly Halloween-inspired feel. Add in the narrative following the children’s verse, and the disappearing soldiers mimicking the fallen guests and there is a decided sense of menace to the text.

Originally posted by myfavoritecartoons


10. The Halloween Tree by Ray Bradbury

This is a fast-moving, eerie…tale set on Halloween nigh. Eight costumed boys running to meet their friend Pipkin at the haunted house outside town encounter instead the huge and cadaverous Mr. Moundshroud. As Pipkin scrambles to join them, he is swept away by a dark Something, and Moundshroud leads the boys on the tail of adventures. This book is actually for kids but I read it last year at the age of 18 and I loved it and learned a lot about Halloweens history.
(Also I loved the movie as a kid)

Originally posted by kyecheng


Bonus

Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier

It’s an ideal choice when you’re looking for something to read while curled up under a blanket, sipping a hot drink. From the famous opening line to the dramatic conclusion, Rebecca is also perfect for a discussion title, if you’re looking for one for your book club to read this fall. The atmospheric novel is a modern classic, blending Gothic romance and mystery.

family gatherings