archaeologist

she-is-made-of-outer-space  asked:

I reblogged it from my sideblog bellsclarkey 😊 Congratulations on you follower milestone!! Could you possibly write this prompt for bellarke? "you had an accident and hit your head. the doctor says you have some kind of amnesia that restarts your memory every few hours, but that doesn’t change the fact that we’re still married so please stop with the flirty pick up lines" Thank you!!

thank you so much! <3

also, i turned this into an archaeologists au while i’m at it, bcos why not lmao

YOUR BELLARKE FIC:

[also on ao3]

Bellamy wakes up to a rhythmic, steady prodding, something both hard and soft jabbing into his temple, over and over again. 

He snaps his head up from the bed he’s currently slumped sideways over, his legs numb from hours in the hospital chair. “Clarke?”

She blinks at him, her face clean save for a couple of small scrapes and the butterfly bandage across her brow. “You’re sleeping on my arm.”

“Oh, shit.” He opens his fists instantly, releasing her hand from the confines of his sleep-heavy slump. “Sorry, I— are you okay? How are you feeling?”

Her eyes travel slowly around the room, taking in the bed and the beeping machines. “Am I in the hospital?”

All the breath rushes out of him in a desperate wave of relief and worry. “Yes, you’re in the hospital. Do you want some water? Here, have some water.”

She merely blinks at the cup he brings over to her from the bedside table, frowning slightly at the straw he holds out to her before looking up at him.

“Are you a nurse?”

He rolls his eyes, even as he welcomes the release of anxiety lifting off his shoulders. If she’s already back to cracking jokes, she must be feeling fine. “Sure, Clarke. Here, drink some water.”

She sips obediently, settling back into her pillow as she watches him bring the cup back to the bedside table. “You’re not wearing scrubs.”

“They ran out of my colour,” he says dryly, moving back to the bed to perch gently on it, careful to avoid jostling her. 

She hums silently, head cocked as she observes him. “Shame. I love a man in a uniform.”

He blinks at the familiar curve of her lips. That’s definitely not her usual happy-Clarke smile. That looks a lot more like Clarke’s I’m-about-to-make-YOU-very-happy smile.

“Clarke,” he says, “are you feeling alright?”

She shifts on the bed, still smiling that coy smile. “Come on, now. That’s not fair. You know my name, but I don’t know yours.” She pauses, head tilting invitingly. “FYI, this bed’s not the only thing in this room that’s single, you know.”

He stares at her for a full three seconds, every last inch of him frozen solid. 

And then he leaps off the bed, bounding to the door and flinging it open. 

Nurse!


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flickr

a1P1130227 by archaeologist_d

Five Facts Tag

Thank you @eliz1369!

1. I grew up in a small town and I’ve never left the US, but I’ve always wanted to see the world. There are so many places I want to visit and I hope I’ll get the chance to someday.

2. I enlisted in the army when I turned 18 but had to leave a year later due to a couple of reasons (one being an injury to my hip). I’ve recently started working out again and I hope to re-enlist sometime next year. (Gotta pay for college somehow)

3. I’ve always loved history and my dream job is to be an archaeologist.

4. My grandfather is one of the main reasons that I’m so comfortable fangirling over the things that get me excited. He took me to my first convention and my first renaissance faire, and he’s always willing to geek out with me. He also does cosplay (he’s done Obi Wan Kenobi, Gandalf, and Sherlock Holmes) and he’s bought me few pieces for my own cosplays.

5. I love music. My dad has been a huge influence on my taste in music, which is extremely varied. I grew up listening to things like R&B, Classic Rock, Jazz, and Pop hits from the 60s, 70s and 80s, and I’ve discovered things that he doesn’t listen to too. Between the two of us we have over 12,000 songs on the family computer.

I’m leaving this open to anyone who wants to do it. Just list any 5 facts about yourself.

flickr

aP1070932 by archaeologist_d
Via Flickr:
Merlin filming

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9gag has buried a giant monolith full of rage faces and other awful old memes in an effort to “puzzle” future generations, informing them of said internet memes with 9gags logo slapped on it

Correctly identifying that such a monument would be interpreted and revered by future archaeologists much like monuments of previous civilisations, 4chan has issued a jihad and is now geolocating the burial site of the stone in order to conduct an ISIS style demolition/desecration of the monument

Here is the video they have been going off of:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WanRFNtFwGI

bbc.co.uk
Facial reconstruction made of 'brutally-killed' Pictish man - BBC News
The face of a Pictish man who was "brutally killed" 1,400 years ago is reconstructed by Dundee University researchers.

Here it is! The big archaeology secret I’ve been not allowed to talk about for nearly 6 months…

I’m part of a voluntary organisation called the Rosemarkie Caves Project, and we’ve been doing small excavations on some of the caves that line the south coast of the Black Isle to investigate their potential for archaeology. Last September, on our last day of digging (typical!) we uncovered something truly incredible… The excellently preserved remains of a pretty violently killed Pictish man, tucked into a small nook of the cave. He was on his back with his ankles crossed and arms down by his sides, boulders on his hands and between his legs - a very odd position that screams “ritual”.

Prof Sue Black and her team - forensic anthropologists who usually don’t deal with archaeological remains but those of the more recent past such as identifying victims of war crimes - took on the task of examining the skeleton and detailing his violent demise (the article has the full account). They also created an incredible facial reconstruction of the man - handsome guy.

Archaeologically speaking, human remains in Scotland are generally poorly preserved due to the soil’s acidity. These remains were from a sandy context, protected from the elements by the cave itself, and are perhaps unique in their excellent preservation for their Pictish date.

There’s still a lot more work to be done - we’re waiting for isotope analysis to be carried out to determine a little more about the individual’s origins, and eventually he’ll be written into the broader context of Pictish archaeology, a section of history we still don’t know very much about. What he was doing there and why he was killed we may never know (Sacrifice? Murder? Did the people carrying out the metal working nearby know about the remains, were they the ones who killed him? So many questions!) - but we do know there are plenty more caves to be investigated… Who knows what else we’ll find in them!

If anyone has an questions, give me a shout. 

Bertha Parker Pallan (1907-1978) was a Native American archaeologist, of Abenaki and Seneca descent. Her parents were Behula Tahamont, a Native American actress, and Arthur C. Parker, the first president for the Society of American Archaeology. 

Parker discovered and participated in many archaeological sites during her career, but she is best known for her work at the site of Gypsum Cave. Although she was originally hired her as the expedition cook and secretary, she was allowed to explore the cave and was able to reach more inaccessible areas. It is here that she uncovered the first giant ground sloth remains in association with humans, a discovery that received national attention among anthropologists. After her time at Gypsum Cave, she discovered two additional sites: Corn Creek Campsite, and a pueblo site at Scorpion Hill. She worked for over 10 years as an Assistant in Archaeology and Ethnology at the Southwest Museum, where she published a number of archaeological and ethnological papers in the museum journal. In her later years, she acted as a technical advisory and consultant on TV shows and movies depicting American Indians, and hosted her own TV show on Native American history and folklore.

Bertha Parker Pallan was a ground-breaker in many aspects. She is considered the first female Native American archaeologist, and she is one of the first women  recognized for conducting her work at a high level of skill in the field without a university education. Additionally, her role as a consultant for TV and movies influenced how American Indian cultures and their histories were depicted in the media.

This lovely flower was said to have been a favorite to the princess of Hyrule. Once feared to have gone extinct, it’s recently been spotted growing in the wild.

On Twitter here.

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Tatiana Proskouriakoff (1909-1985) was a Russian-American archaeologist. Originally trained as an architect, she fell in love with Mesoamerica and became a significant contributor to the study Maya history and archaeology.

Proskouriakoff’s ascent into archaeology began when she was recruited as an illustrator for an expedition to the Mayan ruins of Piedas Negras. Over the next few years Proskouriakoff produced a series of reconstructive drawings depicting ancient Mayan cities. Further expeditions and in-the-field drawings allowed her to study the diversity of the architectural styles in Honduras, Mexico, and Guatemala.

Tatiana Proskouriakoff is most famous, however, for her ground-breaking work in deciphering Mayan hieroglyphs.  At this time only dates had been deciphered in Mayan hieroglyphs, but their significance and context were unknown. Using several steles from Piedras Negras, She showed that the inscriptions described historical and biographical items from the lives of the Mayan people and their rulers. She identified the glyph that represented birth. This led to the recognition of birth and death glyphs, the name glyphs of the rulers, parentage information, the capture of enemies, and other aspects of Mayan lives.

Modern scholars credit Proskouriakoff’s tireless, pioneering research in Mayan culture with deciphering age-old Mayan hieroglyphic writing. By the end of her life, she had become one of the premier scholars of Mayan civilization, receiving some of the field’s highest awards, including The Order of the Quetzal, Guatemala’s highest honor.

A New Tomb Has Been Found In China

Which ONE of these is the reason its an exciting find?