arabic people

what’s so frustrating is how the entire world is silent right now. especially these fucking celebrities and the media who all speak up when there’s a tragedy in America or Paris etc. but are MUTE right now on everything going on in Aleppo. Why are people turning a blind eye? this is a genocide. a crime against ALL of humanity. is it because it’s muslims being killed that no one wants to speak up? and at the same time its so mind-blowing how none of the other muslim leaders in the world seem to be doing anything to help their brothers and sisters in Aleppo. the world is silent while innocent people are being killed. 

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Black activists are ready to fight the immigrant ban

  • For a handful of black advocacy organizations, whose members joined protests at airports and on the streets of major cities across the nation, the motivation was clear: if black lives matter, then Trump’s controversial ban can not stand, they said. 
  • Some groups are scrambling to devote more resources to aiding those affected, in recognition that the executive order is bringing harm to tens of thousands of Arab and black people alike.
  • “I think the most difficult thing for us to get people to understand is that this ban transcends religion — it goes to race,” Carl Lipscombe, programs manager for the Black Alliance for Justice Immigration, said in a phone interview Monday. Read more

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ARAB LGBTQIA+ POSITIVITY

TO EVERY GAY, BISEXUAL, PANSEXUAL, ASEXUAL, AND/OR TRANS ARAB, OR ANYTHING ELSE,
YOU ARE VALID.
YOU AREN’T FAKING IT TO GO AGAINST STEREOTYPES OR REBEL.
YOU AREN’T A SHAME TO YOUR FAMILY.
YOU AREN’T A PREDATOR.
YOU AREN’T DIRTY OR GROSS.
YOU AREN’T “TRYING TO IMPERSONATE WESTERN CULTURE” OR “BEING TRENDY”
IT ISN’T A PHASE. AND EVEN IF IT IS, THATS OKAY.
YOU ARE AMAZING AND WONDERFUL AND SO SO VALID.

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Language is one of the most complex feats that humans have achieved through evolution, yet we don’t even notice it. In fact, scientists have been fasicnated by it for many years. This infographic explores what parts of our brain take part in language production and comprehension, how we learn language and the benefits of learning more than one language.

theguardian.com
'It’s dance or die': The ballet dancer forbidden to perform by Islamic State
Facing death threats, Ahmad Joudeh risked everything to keep his dream of dancing alive. Now the Palestinian dances for the Dutch National Ballet
By Renate van der Zee

Half a year ago, ballet dancer Ahmad Joudeh was giving dance lessons to orphaned children in war-torn Damascus. Now he has made his debut at the Dutch National Ballet and is studying at the ballet academy in Amsterdam. “It took me a month to fully realise I really am in Amsterdam, and I still can’t believe my luck,” Joudeh says.

For years, as the war raged around him and his family, Joudeh - a stateless Palestinian in Syria - had tried to make ends meet by teaching, and had received death threats from Islamic State. When the summons to do three years of military service arrived, the 26-year-old began to believe that this was going to be the end of the dream that he had cradled from childhood.

But his life changed radically in August 2016 when a Dutch TV journalist made a documentary about him. In front of the camera Joudeh danced on the rubble that once was the Palestinian refugee camp Yarmouk, where he had grown up. “I did it for the souls of my five family members who were killed there,’’ he says.

Soon afterwards he was filmed dancing in the ancient Roman theatre of Palmyra - the site, just a few months earlier, of mass executions by Isis. “Dancing in the Palmyra theatre was my way to fight Isis. It was my way to tell them: you can kill people, but you can’t keep me from dancing. It was a dangerous thing to do, we couldn’t stay there longer than one hour, and it was 50C (122F) in the sun. But I did it because I knew I would never have the chance again. And I was right. Isis have destroyed the theatre now. I cried for two days when I heard the news.”

When the documentary was aired on Dutch television, it attracted the attention of Ted Brandsen, the artistic director of the Dutch National Ballet. He decided on the spot to set up a fund called Dance for Peace to enable Joudeh to come to the Netherlands to dance and study.

Joudeh not only struggled to survive as a dancer during the Syrian war: he also fought a tough, private war to realise his dream. “My father forbid me to dance,” he says. “Because in our culture, to be a ballet dancer is the worst thing your son can choose to do for a living. He said it was a shame for the family and wanted me to study English or medicine. But I said no, this is my life. I went to dance class secretly. When he found out, he beat me with a wooden stick. He used to beat me really hard. Once he hurt my leg so badly, I couldn’t dance for days. But I never gave in. I said to him: it’s dance or die.”

He had these very words tattooed on his neck after he received death threats by Isis. “I will never give up dancing,” he says. “I am prepared to fight all my life for the feeling that dancing gives me. It’s a feeling of freedom. Being a Palestinian refugee, born in a camp, I always felt inferior to other people. But when I dance, I feel like a king.’’

My people died on the cross. They died while their hands stretched toward the East and West, while the remnants of their eyes stared at the blackness of the firmament. They died silently, for humanity had closed its ears to their cry. They died because they did not befriend their enemy. They died because they loved their neighbours. They died because they placed trust in all humanity. They died because they did not oppress the oppressors. They died because they were the crushed flowers and not the crushing feet. They died because they were peacemakers. They perished from hunger in a land rich with milk and honey. They died because monsters of hell arose and destroyed all that their fields grew, and devoured the last provisions in their bins. They died because the vipers and sons of vipers spat out poison into the space where the Holy Cedars, the roses and the jasmine breathe their fragrance. - Khalil Gibran

*A nun cries as she stands at the scene inside Cairo’s Coptic cathedral, following a bombing, in Egypt.

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People reacting to being called beautiful (tunisian version)